Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJack R Urich
IN THE NEWS

Jack R Urich

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
February 25, 1987 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Controversial Whittier oil millionaire Jack R. Urich was acquitted Tuesday of all charges that he participated in a multimillion-dollar check-kiting scheme that resulted in the collapse of a Nevada bank and involved other giant banks in California and elsewhere. Urich, president and chief executive of UCO Inc., an oil, construction and shipping concern, was found not guilty by a jury in U.S. District Court in Las Vegas on 27 counts of wire fraud and one count of conspiracy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 9, 1988 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
The former chairman of Family Savings & Loan, the nation's second-largest black-owned thrift, has relinquished control of his Family Savings stock amid a federal probe into fraud at the institution. Oliver A. Trigg Jr., the 37-year-old real estate investor who bought control of Family Savings last July, turned control of his shares over to a voting trust under pressure from federal thrift regulators, it was learned Wednesday.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1985 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
A federal grand jury in Las Vegas has accused controversial Whittier oil millionaire Jack R. Urich and six other men of fraudulently juggling millions of dollars among commercial accounts in a dozen banks here and in Hawaii, Canada and Mexico in an elaborate check-kiting scheme. The 52-count indictment alleged that the seven conspired with the late Joseph V. Agosto, a reputed organized crime figure, to carry out the scheme. The charges came after a 2 1/2-year FBI investigation.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1990 | DENISE GELLENE and GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal grand jury Thursday indicted Los Angeles businessman Oliver A. Trigg Jr. on charges that he masterminded an elaborate scheme to buy Family Federal Savings Bank--one of the nation's largest black-owned thrifts--with its own money. Though the use of a dummy company and a straw purchaser, the indictment alleged, Trigg sold land to the Los Angeles-based thrift--then known as Family Savings & Loan--for a whopping $2.7-million profit. Trigg used $1.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1987 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Oliver A. Trigg Jr. was on the Hawaiian island of Maui on Aug. 4, savoring the greatest coup of his short career: his $1.24-million takeover of Family Savings & Loan, the nation's fourth-largest black-owned thrift. As Trigg celebrated his success, events 2,675 miles away in Los Angeles cast a shadow over his day in the sun.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|