Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJack Rabbit
IN THE NEWS

Jack Rabbit

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1985 | CAROL MC GRAW and LOIS TIMNICK, Times Staff Writers
From a large brown grocery sack, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Lt. Richard Willey on Friday pulled out a pair of furry, earth-toned rabbit ears, a red-lined black cape and a fat black candle. They might have been props for a nightclub magic act, but the setting was Los Angeles Municipal Court.
ARTICLES BY DATE
AUTOS
July 5, 2006 | SUSAN CARPENTER
THE sign for Thomas Road didn't exactly say come hither. It was hammered into the ground behind a hodgepodge of rusting mailboxes, pieced together from stick-on letters and ringed with barbed wire. On a street bike, I would have taken the hint and ridden right by -- but on a dual sport, it called to me. There wasn't a private property sign or car in sight, just an endless swath of grit switchbacking toward the horizon.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 6, 1999 | Living With Wildlife ANDREA KITAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: We live in a 36-acre townhouse project nestled on a hillside and we are inundated with rabbits. Since I am against killing the animals, I'm very concerned that our board has chosen to use poison. I called the animal control operator, and he said the poison will not kill dogs or cats--yet some rabbits are as big as cats. How can he be right? And what about the food chain? Won't birds and wild animals eating carcasses get poisoned? --J.M.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1999 | GERALDINE RYERSON-CRUZ, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Investors on Thursday snapped up more than $1.5 billion in municipal bonds backed by tolls of the Foothill/Eastern Transportation Corridor, making it the largest tax-exempt sale on Wall Street this year. Securities firms handling the sale, which refinanced an earlier bond issue in an effort to improve the Foothill's cash flow, stopped taking orders after one hour as institutional buyers ordered three times as many bonds as were available.
AUTOS
July 5, 2006 | SUSAN CARPENTER
THE sign for Thomas Road didn't exactly say come hither. It was hammered into the ground behind a hodgepodge of rusting mailboxes, pieced together from stick-on letters and ringed with barbed wire. On a street bike, I would have taken the hint and ridden right by -- but on a dual sport, it called to me. There wasn't a private property sign or car in sight, just an endless swath of grit switchbacking toward the horizon.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1994 | NANCY SPILLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This week Universal Studios released "The Little Rascals," a multimillion-dollar remake of the scruffy kid series that has charmed the world since its birth in 1922. This "Rascals" is remarkably faithful to the Hal Roach originals, right down to Alfalfa's cowlick, Darla's feminine mystique, Froggy's croak and the circle around Petey's eye. Even some of the original locations have been used, with filming in Burbank neighborhoods unchanged since the '20s and '30s.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1999 | GERALDINE RYERSON-CRUZ, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Investors on Thursday snapped up more than $1.5 billion in municipal bonds backed by tolls of the Foothill/Eastern Transportation Corridor, making it the largest tax-exempt sale on Wall Street this year. Securities firms handling the sale, which refinanced an earlier bond issue in an effort to improve the Foothill's cash flow, stopped taking orders after one hour as institutional buyers ordered three times as many bonds as were available.
BOOKS
August 27, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
In his essays, John Muir blended astute scientific observation with an adoring paean to "the immortal beauty and immortal truth of Nature." He wrote lovingly of the animals and plants he studied he studied as he trekked through the California wilderness, especially the Yosemite Valley. His poetic raptures notwithstanding, Muir was one of the first naturalists to recognize the importance of predators in maintaining the balance of nature, even on cultivated land.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1993 | ZAN STEWART
Compact discs are generally the gift of choice for the jazz enthusiast, but books and videos on jazz can be provocative and informative alternatives. Here are some of the year's top books and videos, as selected by members of The Times' jazz staff: Phil Woods, "Live at the Maintenance Shop," Shanachie (59 min., $19.95.). Recorded in the late 1970s for Iowa Public Television and not rebroadcast since, this is a first-rate performance video that captures Woods' quartet in an ebullient mood.
MAGAZINE
August 2, 1992
In "GM and the Juicemobile" ( June 21), Marla Cone noted the Impact's ability to "reach 60 m.p.h. in eight seconds--faster than 98% of the cars on the road." On the other hand, Nissan's electric car, the FEV, was said to accelerate more slowly but can recharge its batteries in 15 minutes instead of the Impact's eight hours. Doesn't the capacity for jack-rabbit starts come at the expense of more practical but less sexy features? Didn't this type of fossilized thinking bring us the gas guzzlers that got the American auto industry into its current mess?
NEWS
May 6, 1999 | Living With Wildlife ANDREA KITAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: We live in a 36-acre townhouse project nestled on a hillside and we are inundated with rabbits. Since I am against killing the animals, I'm very concerned that our board has chosen to use poison. I called the animal control operator, and he said the poison will not kill dogs or cats--yet some rabbits are as big as cats. How can he be right? And what about the food chain? Won't birds and wild animals eating carcasses get poisoned? --J.M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1985 | CAROL MC GRAW and LOIS TIMNICK, Times Staff Writers
From a large brown grocery sack, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Lt. Richard Willey on Friday pulled out a pair of furry, earth-toned rabbit ears, a red-lined black cape and a fat black candle. They might have been props for a nightclub magic act, but the setting was Los Angeles Municipal Court.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1995 | ZAN STEWART
With his majestic, barrel-deep, river-wide tone and let-it-loose improvisational style, tenor saxophonist Stewart--now 23 but just 21 when this CD was recorded--bears an uncanny resemblance to the Sonny Rollins who arrived on the scene in the early '50s. Like that giant, Stewart can--as shown by "Koko" and "From This Moment On"--crank out gorgeous peals of notes with jack-rabbit urgency, slowing occasionally for the well-timed, gutbucket remark.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|