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Jack Rabbit

IMAGE
March 9, 2008 | Melissa Magsaysay, Times Staff Writer
CALL them the anti-"it" bags, the handbag collections from a rising crop of Los Angeles designers that are good enough to make you give up dropping your rent on a bag that everyone already has. Forever. Forget the flashy L.A stereotype of studded pink hobos and over-adorned totes. These lines are understated, well priced and have the casual sensibility and ease that California designers do best. Naturally, more than a few have made it onto the arms of celebrities, giving these talented designers exposure to the rest of the world.
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SPORTS
May 2, 1988 | CHRISTINE BRENNAN, Washington Post
Margaret Groos, a former University of Virginia All-American who all but gave up competitive running a couple years ago because of medical problems, sprinted to victory Sunday in the U.S. Women's Olympic Marathon Trial in the best time run by an American woman in 2 1/2 years. With five miles left in the Pittsburgh Marathon, Groos, from Nashville, pulled away from Nancy Ditz to win in 2:29:50. Ditz, of Woodside, Calif., came along 24 seconds later.
NEWS
July 18, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Reporting from Lakemont Park in Altoona, Pa.-- My current  travels across the great American roller-coaster belt will put me aboard five of the oldest operating coasters in the world, including the very oldest at little Lakemont Park here in Altoona. Photos : View the 21 oldest roller coasters in the world I found the rough, rickety and rundown Leap-the-Dips at Lakemont Park to be the perfect throwback to the golden age of coasters, when thrills were raw and wild rather than neutered by lawyers and lawmakers.
SPORTS
December 17, 2006 | Mark Heisler
Isiah's Knicks are a little too ready to rumble So much for the good old days when the biggest problem was the basketball. Saturday night's brawl in Madison Square Garden was too reminiscent of the 2004 Auburn Hills riot for comfort. This involved only Knicks and Nuggets players, but Commissioner David Stern may hit the $10-million mark in fines and suspensions anyway. If it takes two to rumble, it's not surprising one was the Knicks.
SPORTS
August 18, 1986 | STEVE LOWERY, Times Staff Writer
Moose Stubing, Angel third base coach, is as big as his name implies. At 6-feet 3-inches and 250 pounds, Stubing doesn't so much flash signs as he does billboards. Sunday, in the first inning of the Angels' game against the Oakland A's in Anaheim Stadium, Stubing held up his arms and screamed with enough power to stop a truck. Brian Downing was barreling toward Stubing after a one-out double by Reggie Jackson.
NEWS
April 10, 1991 | PAMELA MARIN
In 10-gallon hats, chamois chaps, snakeskin boots and belt buckles the size of T-bone steaks, they rolled in like tumbleweeds for the grub and the show at Wild Bill's Wild West Dinner Extravaganza in Buena Park. The Saturday night hoedown drew more than 600 duded-out guests at $50 per, raising an estimated $20,000 for the local chapter of the March of Dimes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1995
In Lancaster, where the average temperature in July is a scorching 98 degrees, desert wildlife must adapt to the environment. Survival for many means lying low during the hot daytime hours under a bush, in a nest or burrow that will provide adequate protection. Since water is scarce, animals obtain moisture from the plants or animals they eat. Here's a look at some of the animals in and around the Antelope Valley that make their home in the western Mojave Desert.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1998 | KAREN GRIGSBY BATES, Karen Grigsby Bates is a regular contributor to this page
Watching her streak across the track, I could only think of one thing: cheetah. Florence Griffith Joyner, who died Monday apparently from a heart seizure at the age of 38, was like a cheetah when she ran: strong, sleek, powerfully muscled and incredibly beautiful. You half expected to see the track behind her burst into flame as she zipped by, leaving twin trails of smoldering ash in her wake. She gave the phrase "fast girl" an entirely new definition.
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