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October 14, 1990 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
Jack Rollins and Charles Joffe have been close friends and business associates for 38 years. For much of that time they had been part of a comedy management team (with Buddy Morra, Larry Brezner and David Steinberg) that handled, as the saying goes, some of the biggest names in the business. Then the firm broke up. Like the consigliore in "The Godfather," Rollins and Joffe each became content serving a single client.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1990 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
Jack Rollins and Charles Joffe have been close friends and business associates for 38 years. For much of that time they had been part of a comedy management team (with Buddy Morra, Larry Brezner and David Steinberg) that handled, as the saying goes, some of the biggest names in the business. Then the firm broke up. Like the consigliore in "The Godfather," Rollins and Joffe each became content serving a single client.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
From Carson to Letterman: Peter Lassally, who was with "The Tonight Show" for 22 of Johnny Carson's 30 years, is now executive producer of "Late Night With David Letterman." Lassally succeeds Jack Rollins, who retired in April.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Fun With Rick: Comedian Rick Reynolds will bring his one-man show, "Only the Truth Is Funny," to the Canon Theatre in Beverly Hills on Sept. 15. The "unabashedly autobiographical" show, which had successful runs in San Francisco in 1990 and at New York's Westside Theatre this year, is scheduled for an indefinite run at the Canon, where "Love Letters" just closed. Jack Rollins and Charles Joffe are producing.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1988 | Leonard Klady
Disney is courting David Letterman for a big screen comedy. But producer Larry Brezner ("Good Morning, Vietnam")--partner in the firm that manages the loony late nighter and who has a Disney deal--tells us scheduling is the major stumbling block. "NBC's not happy about losing David for 10 to 12 consecutive weeks," Brezner said. "So we're looking for a role like the one Bill Murray did in 'Tootsie' that would allow him to get in and get out quickly."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Big Dave is coming back--with or without his gaggle of gag writers. Starting Tuesday night, NBC's "Late Night With David Letterman" is going back on the air with new shows, according to the show's co-executive producer, Jack Rollins. The first show--starting at 12:45 a.m. Pacific time due to Wimbledon highlights--will feature Laker coach Pat Riley and rocker Graham Parker.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1986 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
In the 1980's, the pendulum of power in American studio movies has probably swung back to the producer. That's not necessarily a happy development. Recall John Ford, the great American film maker who once reproved an actor for pointing at the dinner table, saying: "There are only three things you point at. Let me get the billing straight: You may point at producers, privies and French pastry." Ford's harshness was extreme (and probably slightly burlesqued to make his point).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1995 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
That lovable snowman with the "corncob pipe and a button nose and two eyes made out of coal" said he'd be back. But he may not have bargained for "Frosty Returns," a new animated special on CBS tonight, most notable for its preachiness and forgettable music, frequently sung off-key. Jonathan Winters narrates, John Goodman voices the iceman and Andrea Martin, Jan Hooks and Brian Doyle-Murray are on hand too, but they're all wasted in this unimaginative tale of environmental correctness.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2005 | Robert Hilburn
Martina McBride "Timeless" (RCA) * * * 1/2 IF you don't follow country music, this delightful CD should be a double treat. First, it introduces you to McBride, who hasn't received the pop exposure of Faith Hill or Shania Twain, though she is a more heartfelt country singer than either. Second, the album showcases the character and range of classic country songwriting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2008 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Charles H. Joffe, a legendary manager of comic talent who helped guide the careers of Dick Cavett, Robin Williams, Billy Crystal and Woody Allen and co-produced nearly all of Allen's films, died Wednesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles after a long illness. He was 78. Joffe and his business partner, Jack Rollins, were considered the deans of comedy management, who nurtured many young comics through their small New York City agency.
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