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Jack Rudloe

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NEWS
August 7, 1994 | BILL BERGSTROM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
"Aaah!" yells Jack Rudloe, snatching his thumb from a moray eel's slashing teeth. A fish he's trying to feed to the eel flips over his shoulder and splashes into another aquarium. Rudloe grimaces and clutches his hand. It's the fifth eel bite Rudloe has suffered since he closed the books on a short-lived college career three decades ago and moved to the beach to make a life working on shrimp boats with a collector's bucket.
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BUSINESS
August 12, 2010 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Thousands of people have tried, in their own quixotic ways, to help BP protect wildlife and clean up crude in the Gulf of Mexico after the worst oil disaster in the country's history. There were those who shaved their dogs and sent the hair south for the company to use to soak up the oil. And there were inventors who flew to Louisiana hoping that their cleanup gadgets would catch BP's eye. A Taiwanese billionaire retrofitted a giant tanker to skim oil from the ocean. And then there's Jack Rudloe, who's determined to protect vulnerable and important sea life — and his business — all on his own. Rudloe, 67, wants to save the gulf's mollusks, shrimp, crabs, seahorses and other invertebrates from what he sees as potential extinction.
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BUSINESS
August 12, 2010 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Thousands of people have tried, in their own quixotic ways, to help BP protect wildlife and clean up crude in the Gulf of Mexico after the worst oil disaster in the country's history. There were those who shaved their dogs and sent the hair south for the company to use to soak up the oil. And there were inventors who flew to Louisiana hoping that their cleanup gadgets would catch BP's eye. A Taiwanese billionaire retrofitted a giant tanker to skim oil from the ocean. And then there's Jack Rudloe, who's determined to protect vulnerable and important sea life — and his business — all on his own. Rudloe, 67, wants to save the gulf's mollusks, shrimp, crabs, seahorses and other invertebrates from what he sees as potential extinction.
NEWS
August 14, 1994 | LAURA RANDALL, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
From August through December every year, the waters off Panacea, Fla., turn into a white-and-purple polka-dot sea as millions of jellyfish the size of soccer balls pulsate along this stretch of Gulf of Mexico coast. To commercial fishermen such as Leo Lovel of Panacea, and to every swimmer who has ever been stung by one, the cannonball jellyfish-- Stomolophus meleagris-- are, like jellyfish everywhere, a painful, irritating nuisance. But to Florida aquaculture officials, the cannonballs are potential moneymakers.
NEWS
April 7, 1989 | From United Press International
Naturalist and author Jack Rudloe on Thursday started a protest campaign against the oil spill in Alaska, urging Exxon customers to send the company credit cards sealed in oil. Rudloe said he hopes that angry Exxon customers will inundate the company with the oil-coated symbols of lost profits. "I'm utterly disgusted with the irresponsible attitude Exxon has taken and what they have done to the Gulf of Alaska, which is probably one of the richest wildlife areas in the world," Rudloe said.
NEWS
August 14, 1994 | LAURA RANDALL, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
From August through December every year, the waters off Panacea, Fla., turn into a white-and-purple polka-dot sea as millions of jellyfish the size of soccer balls pulsate along this stretch of Gulf of Mexico coast. To commercial fishermen such as Leo Lovel of Panacea, and to every swimmer who has ever been stung by one, the cannonball jellyfish-- Stomolophus meleagris-- are, like jellyfish everywhere, a painful, irritating nuisance. But to Florida aquaculture officials, the cannonballs are potential moneymakers.
BOOKS
August 20, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Rudloe writes with great affection about the seven species of sea turtles found in American waters; unfortunately, he doesn't write about them with great skill. The text of "Time" is repetitive and marred by awkward transitions between objective facts and personal experience.
NEWS
June 28, 1992 | From Associated Press
Volunteers pick up about a ton of beverage containers, diapers, tires, light bulbs and other waste from every mile of Gulf Coast beach during annual clean-up campaigns. Even the rusted bodies of cars and a school bus can be found on the beaches of this barrier island in southern Texas. But these cleanup efforts aren't enough to prevent thousands of birds and other marine life from ingesting debris or becoming tangled in fishing line, six-pack rings or other trash.
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | BILL BERGSTROM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
"Aaah!" yells Jack Rudloe, snatching his thumb from a moray eel's slashing teeth. A fish he's trying to feed to the eel flips over his shoulder and splashes into another aquarium. Rudloe grimaces and clutches his hand. It's the fifth eel bite Rudloe has suffered since he closed the books on a short-lived college career three decades ago and moved to the beach to make a life working on shrimp boats with a collector's bucket.
BOOKS
August 20, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Rudloe writes with great affection about the seven species of sea turtles found in American waters; unfortunately, he doesn't write about them with great skill. The text of "Time" is repetitive and marred by awkward transitions between objective facts and personal experience.
NEWS
April 7, 1989 | From United Press International
Naturalist and author Jack Rudloe on Thursday started a protest campaign against the oil spill in Alaska, urging Exxon customers to send the company credit cards sealed in oil. Rudloe said he hopes that angry Exxon customers will inundate the company with the oil-coated symbols of lost profits. "I'm utterly disgusted with the irresponsible attitude Exxon has taken and what they have done to the Gulf of Alaska, which is probably one of the richest wildlife areas in the world," Rudloe said.
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