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NEWS
October 6, 1993 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The former House sergeant-at-arms has agreed to plead guilty to three felony charges of embezzlement, fraud and filing a false report to Congress in connection with the House bank scandal, the Justice Department said Tuesday. Jack Russ has acknowledged embezzling $75,300 from the now-defunct bank, which he had supervised, by cashing 17 checks there in 1989 despite knowing he did not have enough in his account to cover them, the department said.
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NEWS
December 18, 1993 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former House Sergeant-at-Arms Jack Russ, a powerful Capitol Hill figure who once ran the scandal-scarred House bank, was sentenced Friday to two years in prison for embezzlement, fraud and filing a false report. U.S. District Judge Stanley Harris also ordered Russ, 48, to pay $445,000 to investors he bilked and to perform 250 hours of community service. He pleaded guilty to three felony counts in October.
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NEWS
April 6, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS and SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Amid all the talk about bad checks, imperiled perks and angry constituents, one question keeps recurring these days in the private conversations in the corridors and cloakrooms of Congress: Who shot J.R.? It is a different J.R. they are talking about, of course. And the question of who shot him may turn out to be little more than a bizarre footnote to the sordid saga of debts, overdrafts and patronage now unfolding--with fatal consequences for some political careers--on Capitol Hill.
NEWS
December 17, 1993 | From Associated Press
Former House Sergeant-at-Arms Jack Russ displayed "thoroughly reprehensible" conduct and should spend at least two years in prison for his role in the House bank scandal, the Justice Department said Thursday. Russ is to be sentenced today by U.S. District Judge Stanley Harris on three felony counts to which he pleaded guilty in October. One charge carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and the other two carry five-year maximums.
NEWS
December 18, 1993 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former House Sergeant-at-Arms Jack Russ, a powerful Capitol Hill figure who once ran the scandal-scarred House bank, was sentenced Friday to two years in prison for embezzlement, fraud and filing a false report. U.S. District Judge Stanley Harris also ordered Russ, 48, to pay $445,000 to investors he bilked and to perform 250 hours of community service. He pleaded guilty to three felony counts in October.
NEWS
July 27, 1992 | From The Times' Washington staff
YOUR TAX DOLLARS AT WORK: As retiring Rep. Mervyn M. Dymally (D-Compton) serves out his final months in Washington, he has hired a consultant to advise him on the potential pitfalls of returning to civilian life after 22 years in Congress. The job calls for one visit a week to Dymally's Capitol Hill office, and the pay is dirt cheap--only $100 monthly.
NEWS
December 17, 1993 | From Associated Press
Former House Sergeant-at-Arms Jack Russ displayed "thoroughly reprehensible" conduct and should spend at least two years in prison for his role in the House bank scandal, the Justice Department said Thursday. Russ is to be sentenced today by U.S. District Judge Stanley Harris on three felony counts to which he pleaded guilty in October. One charge carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and the other two carry five-year maximums.
NEWS
March 14, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The decline and fall of Jack Russ, the House sergeant-at-arms who mismanaged the House bank, may turn out to be a symbol for the gradual erosion of an old regime in Congress and the birth of a new meritocracy. By any yardstick in the private sector, the 46-year-old Russ--who resigned Thursday night--lacked the qualifications to carry out his duties as head of the House bank.
NEWS
March 3, 1992 | Associated Press
The sergeant-at-arms of the House of Representatives was in stable condition Monday after being shot in the face while walking his dog just five blocks from the Capitol. Jack Russ was accosted from behind late Sunday by two men and a woman and robbed, Capitol Police spokesman Dan Nichols said. One of the men stuck a handgun in Russ' mouth and fired, but he turned his head just as the gun went off and the bullet came out his left cheek, Nichols said. No arrest had been made.
NEWS
January 28, 1991 | Reuters
The Capitol is mounting extremely tight security, perhaps the most stringent in history, to guard against any terrorist attack during President Bush's State of the Union address. The Capitol will be cleared except for employees and press. No cars will be be permitted on the grounds. Streets will be closed in a four- block radius. Everyone except members of Congress will be closely searched and will have to go through two metal detectors before getting into the House chamber for the address.
NEWS
October 6, 1993 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The former House sergeant-at-arms has agreed to plead guilty to three felony charges of embezzlement, fraud and filing a false report to Congress in connection with the House bank scandal, the Justice Department said Tuesday. Jack Russ has acknowledged embezzling $75,300 from the now-defunct bank, which he had supervised, by cashing 17 checks there in 1989 despite knowing he did not have enough in his account to cover them, the department said.
NEWS
July 27, 1992 | From The Times' Washington staff
YOUR TAX DOLLARS AT WORK: As retiring Rep. Mervyn M. Dymally (D-Compton) serves out his final months in Washington, he has hired a consultant to advise him on the potential pitfalls of returning to civilian life after 22 years in Congress. The job calls for one visit a week to Dymally's Capitol Hill office, and the pay is dirt cheap--only $100 monthly.
NEWS
April 6, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS and SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Amid all the talk about bad checks, imperiled perks and angry constituents, one question keeps recurring these days in the private conversations in the corridors and cloakrooms of Congress: Who shot J.R.? It is a different J.R. they are talking about, of course. And the question of who shot him may turn out to be little more than a bizarre footnote to the sordid saga of debts, overdrafts and patronage now unfolding--with fatal consequences for some political careers--on Capitol Hill.
NEWS
March 14, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The decline and fall of Jack Russ, the House sergeant-at-arms who mismanaged the House bank, may turn out to be a symbol for the gradual erosion of an old regime in Congress and the birth of a new meritocracy. By any yardstick in the private sector, the 46-year-old Russ--who resigned Thursday night--lacked the qualifications to carry out his duties as head of the House bank.
NEWS
June 17, 1987 | Associated Press
A new emergency street barricade at the Capitol unexpectedly sprang into action Tuesday and halted its first automobile. The occupants were not terrorists, however, but members of the White House staff. Capitol police spokesman Michael Hannelb said it was all a mistake.
NEWS
February 4, 1986 | United Press International
Authorities enforced unusually strict security measures on Capitol Hill today, site of President Reagan's State of the Union address to members of Congress, the Supreme Court and diplomatic corps. With increasing concern about terrorist activities, threats from Libya and Christmastime attacks at two European airports, Capitol Hill police appeared to be taking special precautions for Reagan's 8 p.m. EST speech.
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