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Jack Shakely

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NEWS
August 24, 1999 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Shakely is an Oklahoma boy, and it shows. He says things like "bless her heart" and "gosh darn," and gets away with it. He greets everyone--security guard, colleague, maitre d'--by name, and when he asks, "How ya doin'?," he actually leaves room for an answer. And there's the accent, worn down a bit by years in the big city to a genial, countrified lilt that carries his words along like running water. It's a definite asset.
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NEWS
August 24, 1999 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Shakely is an Oklahoma boy, and it shows. He says things like "bless her heart" and "gosh darn," and gets away with it. He greets everyone--security guard, colleague, maitre d'--by name, and when he asks, "How ya doin'?," he actually leaves room for an answer. And there's the accent, worn down a bit by years in the big city to a genial, countrified lilt that carries his words along like running water. It's a definite asset.
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OPINION
April 26, 1998 | Steve Proffitt, Steve Proffitt, a contributing editor to Opinion, is director of the JSM+ New Media Lab
A popular perception about people in Los Angeles is that they're too busy talking on cell phones, having plastic surgery or doing lunch to think about contributing to their community. But, like so much about Southern California, this, too, appears to be based largely on myth. There are, in fact, strong indications that Angelenos may feel more of a sense of responsibility toward their neighbors than do folks in New York, Chicago and other major U.S. cities. Late last year, a Field Research Corp.
OPINION
April 26, 1998 | Steve Proffitt, Steve Proffitt, a contributing editor to Opinion, is director of the JSM+ New Media Lab
A popular perception about people in Los Angeles is that they're too busy talking on cell phones, having plastic surgery or doing lunch to think about contributing to their community. But, like so much about Southern California, this, too, appears to be based largely on myth. There are, in fact, strong indications that Angelenos may feel more of a sense of responsibility toward their neighbors than do folks in New York, Chicago and other major U.S. cities. Late last year, a Field Research Corp.
OPINION
July 18, 1993 | KAREN GRIGSBY BATES, Karen Grigsby Bates writes from Los Angeles about modern culture, race relations and politics for several national publications.
The truth, as the Bible tells us, is the light. What it didn't tell us was this: Sometimes the light will make you mad before it deigns to set you free. Jack Shakely, the president of the California Community Foundation, found that out the hard way earlier this month, when he was blasted by Latino and African-American grant-makers who read remarks he'd made in an interview after last year's civil unrest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1993
In an era of columnists' mean-spirited cynicism and wise-guy political cartoons, it was with great happiness that I read Jack Shakely's and Karen Grigsby Bates' wonderful columns (Commentary, March 3). Shakely reminds us that in each individual there exists the miracle of reuniting through caring and sharing, that if each of us spends a few hours a month, we can improve our neighborhood and our world. There is such power in between our ears if the attitude is good. Bates' ode to her generations of teachers is inspirational--that each of us is a teacher and a student, that teachers should be honored, and that teaching should be a constant celebration of parent/child, oldster/youngster, you/me.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1993
Karen Grigsby Bates hits the nail right on the head in her perspective on race relations, "Don't Muzzle the Messenger" (Commentary, July 18). How could the California Community Foundation's Jack Shakely have gotten such a radical idea that there are tensions between blacks and Latinos? Maybe from a meeting with board members of Multiracial Americans of Southern California (MASC) that we had with him two years ago. MASC studies mixed-race and bilingual families as a microcosm of race relations in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1988 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Jack Shakely has a million dollars he is trying to give away, but he can't find many takers. The money comes from the Fund for New Americans, probably the only program in the nation set up to help undocumented immigrants pay the fees for the government's amnesty. Shakely raised the money from some of the city's biggest charities. The desire to help Third World people in need was nothing new for the 48-year-old former Peace Corps volunteer.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES SOCIETY WRITER
Claudia Moore was being realistic when she applied for a grant for her Resident Empowerment Project to train tenants as managers of their public housing projects around Los Angeles. Maybe she would get funded, maybe she wouldn't. "Public housing is a (popular) term today," she says, "but so many people have a negative image about public housing residents; they think all the drugs and gangs come out of here.
OPINION
October 2, 2007
Re "Coming to terms," Opinion, Sept. 30 Steven Pinker's insightful and funny essay reminded me that for every new word that seems to pop up like a mushroom in the basement, others die aborning no matter how hard journalists try. In the '70s, there was a semi-serious attempt to coin the word for an unmarried romantic partner as "posslq" (pronounced possel que), an acronym taken from tax forms for "person of the opposite sex sharing living quarters."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1993
Karen Grigsby Bates hits the nail right on the head in her perspective on race relations, "Don't Muzzle the Messenger" (Commentary, July 18). How could the California Community Foundation's Jack Shakely have gotten such a radical idea that there are tensions between blacks and Latinos? Maybe from a meeting with board members of Multiracial Americans of Southern California (MASC) that we had with him two years ago. MASC studies mixed-race and bilingual families as a microcosm of race relations in Southern California.
OPINION
July 18, 1993 | KAREN GRIGSBY BATES, Karen Grigsby Bates writes from Los Angeles about modern culture, race relations and politics for several national publications.
The truth, as the Bible tells us, is the light. What it didn't tell us was this: Sometimes the light will make you mad before it deigns to set you free. Jack Shakely, the president of the California Community Foundation, found that out the hard way earlier this month, when he was blasted by Latino and African-American grant-makers who read remarks he'd made in an interview after last year's civil unrest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1993
In an era of columnists' mean-spirited cynicism and wise-guy political cartoons, it was with great happiness that I read Jack Shakely's and Karen Grigsby Bates' wonderful columns (Commentary, March 3). Shakely reminds us that in each individual there exists the miracle of reuniting through caring and sharing, that if each of us spends a few hours a month, we can improve our neighborhood and our world. There is such power in between our ears if the attitude is good. Bates' ode to her generations of teachers is inspirational--that each of us is a teacher and a student, that teachers should be honored, and that teaching should be a constant celebration of parent/child, oldster/youngster, you/me.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES SOCIETY WRITER
Claudia Moore was being realistic when she applied for a grant for her Resident Empowerment Project to train tenants as managers of their public housing projects around Los Angeles. Maybe she would get funded, maybe she wouldn't. "Public housing is a (popular) term today," she says, "but so many people have a negative image about public housing residents; they think all the drugs and gangs come out of here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1988 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Jack Shakely has a million dollars he is trying to give away, but he can't find many takers. The money comes from the Fund for New Americans, probably the only program in the nation set up to help undocumented immigrants pay the fees for the government's amnesty. Shakely raised the money from some of the city's biggest charities. The desire to help Third World people in need was nothing new for the 48-year-old former Peace Corps volunteer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1988
A spirited challenge to South Bay Hospital District board members apparently had little effect, as voters Tuesday returned incumbents Eva Snow, Mary Davis and Virginia D. Fischer to office for new four-year terms. Challengers Steve Schlesinger and Jack Shakely were rejected. Snow was reelected with the most votes.
OPINION
January 4, 2006
Ellen Stern Harris (obituary, Jan. 3) was a fine journalist, community organizer and a battler for rights and order, even if she bruised a few friends along the way. When the California Community Foundation honored her in 1995 for her service to the nonprofit community, she thanked me, then pulled me aside. Rather apologetically, she told me the gift bags we were distributing to departing guests were cluttering up the exit, and she had alerted the Beverly Hills Fire Department. Turned out she was absolutely right, as usual.
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