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August 25, 1990 | JOHN DART and BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Catholic Archbishop Roger M. Mahony has insisted that he did not know Jack Sheinkman is Jewish. If he had, Mahony said recently, he would not have ended a letter to Sheinkman with the admonishment that he was "praying that the spirit of Jesus Christ might take deep root in your own life."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1990 | JOHN DART and BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Catholic Archbishop Roger M. Mahony has insisted that he did not know Jack Sheinkman is Jewish. If he had, Mahony said recently, he would not have ended a letter to Sheinkman with the admonishment that he was "praying that the spirit of Jesus Christ might take deep root in your own life."
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BUSINESS
April 21, 1989 | From Times wire service s
Two American labor leaders said today that Soviet officials admitted that their trade unions have not adequately protected workers but ruled out formation of independent trade organizations. The leaders, AFL-CIO vice presidents Jack Sheinkman and William Winpisinger, said at a news conference, however, that they believe such independent unions, like Poland's Solidarity, might surface. "If steps are not taken to adequately reflect representation and problems that the workers are putting to their leadership, that kind of pressure might ultimately explode," Sheinkman said.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1989 | From Times wire service s
Two American labor leaders said today that Soviet officials admitted that their trade unions have not adequately protected workers but ruled out formation of independent trade organizations. The leaders, AFL-CIO vice presidents Jack Sheinkman and William Winpisinger, said at a news conference, however, that they believe such independent unions, like Poland's Solidarity, might surface. "If steps are not taken to adequately reflect representation and problems that the workers are putting to their leadership, that kind of pressure might ultimately explode," Sheinkman said.
OPINION
July 21, 1996
Re "Liberals Surrender Without a Peep," Commentary, July 9: Ross Baker criticized the "Families First" agenda of congressional Democrats for "mildness, even blandness," but erred in his fundamental assumption that congressional Democrats are "over- whelmingly liberal." They are not. They largely are moderates and incrementalists, which is precisely the nature of the agenda. Even so, its enactment still would represent steps forward for America, rather than the wholesale retreat from 60 years of economic and social progress that Newt Gingrich and congressional Republicans have proposed.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1989 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union has lined up a partner and a financial adviser in an effort to buy Cluett, Peabody & Co., an apparel manufacturing concern acquired by Chicago-based Farley Inc. earlier this year. Union President Jack Sheinkman said in an interview Monday that the union planned to make a bid through an employee ownership plan in a partnership with Spencer Hays, a Nashville, Tenn., businessman who owns several U.S. garment-making operations. "He is an employer that we have about 17 contracts with in 11 states.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1992
I was distressed to read the letter from Cardinal Roger Mahony (Nov. 24), repeating mis-truths about the union campaign at the Catholic cemeteries. Unfortunately, the facts are that the archdiocese used traditional anti-union tactics to wage its campaign against workers who wanted union representation. The cardinal claims that his wage and benefit improvements were not linked to the union drive. However, when the Amalgamated Clothing & Textile Workers Union began its organizing campaign, average workers' wages were $5-$5.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
The House sent the Reagan Administration a new signal of its impatience with trade deficits Wednesday, approving a bill to clamp substantially tighter limits on imports of textiles, apparel and shoes. But the measure fell short of the two-thirds majority required to override an expected presidential veto.
SPORTS
September 15, 1990
In a letter (Sept. 1) Archbishop Roger Mahony takes issue with an article by your reporters Bob Baker and John Dart ("Mahony's Religious Suggestion to Jewish Unionist Stirs Anger," Religion, Aug. 25). For the record, I think it's important to state the matter as seen by our union. Here are the facts: In 1988, more than 100 of the 130 gravediggers employed by the Los Angeles archdiocese signed union cards.
NEWS
October 28, 1987 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
The AFL-CIO adopted a strong resolution Tuesday supporting the Central American peace plan of Costa Rican President Oscar Arias. The resolution was adopted by voice vote without dissent by the 726 delegates to the labor group's biennial convention here and was part of a lengthy measure on foreign affairs issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1996 | HARRY BERNSTEIN, Harry Bernstein was for many years The Times' labor writer
The Republicans are shamefully hypocritical in their furious attacks on unions for spending "lavishly" to stop the Republican "revolution" in its tracks and reelect President Clinton. When unions didn't reach their goal of getting a Democratic majority in the House, the GOP declared an unequivocal victory. It was anything but that.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1992 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Infighting among White House advisers is nothing new, and, with their widely divergent backgrounds, there will be sharp differences between members of President-elect Bill Clinton's Cabinet and his close advisers. That may not be bad for workers or unions, though. Consider this: Conservative corporate executives seemed pleased with Clinton's choice of some Wall Streeters as top aides, and they especially like the pro-business Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Tex.) as Treasury secretary.
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