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Jack Sheldon

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1987 | ZAN STEWART
Jack Sheldon loves to play the trumpet, and while he sounds terrific, it doesn't come easily. "I have to practice all the time," he said while savoring a plate of liver and onions at a Studio City delicatessen. "But I don't feel bad, because Doc Severinsen has to do the same thing and he's a great trumpet player. I've known guys like Harry James--he could just pick up the trumpet after a month layoff and just play great. But I have to play all day, everyday."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2012
MUSIC An L.A. native who's been a fixture around town with the likes of Peter Erskine, Anthony Wilson and veteran trumpeter-vocalist Jack Sheldon, pianist Josh Nelson sounds poised for national prominence on his fifth album as a bandleader, "Discoveries. " Though packed with nods to the vintage sci-fi of H.G. Wells and Jules Verne, the album's sound feels grounded in the now, with rich ensemble playing and a gracefully ambitious compositional voice. Here he performs with a nimble quartet that features guitarist Larry Koonse.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER
Jack Sheldon drew an overflow crowd Monday as he inaugurated a new name-group policy at the Moonlight Tango in Sherman Oaks, where a big band has played regularly once a week. A staple on the West Coast jazz scene for 40 years as trumpeter, singer, comedian and actor, Sheldon has been the eternal sideman or small-combo leader. Clearly, though, this 16-piece ensemble is a logical setting for his eloquent boppish horn, his tongue-in-cheek vocals and weird sense of humor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2011
Larry Zarian Former Glendale mayor and TV, radio host Larry Zarian, 73, a former mayor of Glendale and the first Armenian American to be elected to the City Council, died of blood cancer Thursday at Glendale Adventist Medical Center. Zarian also served as a board member for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority and as a state transportation commissioner. He had his own local cable television show, "The Larry Zarian Forum," and also had hosted a talk-radio program on KIEV that focused on political issues.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jazz may be the sound of surprise, but it's not just the music that grabs one's attention when Jack Sheldon, the veteran trumpeter-bandleader-actor, makes one of his too-rare appearances. Monday night at Catalina Bar & Grill, he turned up in full regalia, leading his 16-piece big jazz band in a celebration of their eighth anniversary.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1992 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trumpeter/singer Jack Sheldon doesn't exactly look like a jazz musician. A comedian, maybe, or possibly a bus driver or a bartender. But his eyes give him away. Performing at Maxwell's on Friday night, Sheldon had that loopy gaze, that sense of peering through space into another plane of reality that so often characterizes jazzmen at work.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1992 | ZAN STEWART
Jack Sheldon, the brilliant-toned trumpeter who also sings with a gleaming tenor and loves to tell funny stories, is having lunch in a Van Nuys Thai restaurant. He is discussing such career high points as the formation of his new big band and his appearance in the 1991 film "For the Boys," when the subject of Harry Connick Jr. comes up. "Oh, I think he's great. He's so hip, so confident, and at that age," said Sheldon, talking with a smile of the singer who is in his mid-20s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Halloween marks an inauspicious anniversary for trumpeter and actor Jack Sheldon. It was two years ago on Halloween that Sheldon found out he had colon cancer. Surgery and a year of chemotherapy followed. Now, Jack is back. "I'm feeling good," the 66-year-old musician said recently by phone from his home in the Hollywood Hills. "I'm getting stronger. It was quite an ordeal, but, considering the alternative . . . ." As proof of that recovery, just look at his schedule for the end of this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Improvisation is central to a performance from Jack Sheldon. Sure, the well-known trumpeter and vocalist creates spontaneously with his horn, bringing a personal touch to the standards he plays. That same kind of off-the-cuff thinking makes for hilariously rewarding comedic, between-song banter, Sheldon's trademark since his days as musical sidekick on "The Merv Griffin Show."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2008 | Gary Goldstein, Special to The Times
Talk about marital commitment. It took Doug McIntyre and Penny Peyser almost as long to shoot and edit their self-financed, self-distributed documentary "Trying to Get Good: The Jazz Odyssey of Jack Sheldon," which opens today at the Westwood Crest Theatre, as the couple has been married. "We ate the elephant one bite at a time," McIntyre joked recently about their maiden filmmaking venture, over tea with Peyser at a Studio City restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2008 | Gary Goldstein, Special to The Times
If the name Jack Sheldon doesn't ring a bell, consider this: Music elite and bebop fans widely consider him the greatest living jazz trumpeter. This unheralded maestro, a founder of the West Coast jazz movement, has, since the 1950s, performed everywhere from the Hollywood Bowl to Carnegie Hall, has played on hundreds of albums and has collaborated with such legendary artists as Benny Goodman, Frank Sinatra, Ray Charles and Peggy Lee.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2008 | Gary Goldstein, Special to The Times
Talk about marital commitment. It took Doug McIntyre and Penny Peyser almost as long to shoot and edit their self-financed, self-distributed documentary "Trying to Get Good: The Jazz Odyssey of Jack Sheldon," which opens today at the Westwood Crest Theatre, as the couple has been married. "We ate the elephant one bite at a time," McIntyre joked recently about their maiden filmmaking venture, over tea with Peyser at a Studio City restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
In an entertainment world overflowing with multi-hyphenates, Jack Sheldon stands on his own. One could easily add, after his name, a string of professional identities that would include trumpeter, singer, comedian, actor, television personality and all-around raconteur. A highly visible presence on the Southland stage since the mid-'50s, he continues to provide a consistently engaging blend of first-rate jazz and no-holds-barred comedic jiving.
NEWS
August 18, 2002
I was delighted to read Steve Lopez's excellent piece on the prodigiously talented Jack Sheldon ("Last of the Hepcats," July 28). There is no jazzman more deserving of recognition than this virtuoso triple threat. Beautiful music pours out of him. There is one point, however, on which Lopez and I differ: Sheldon's singing is as wonderful as his playing. It adds a level of soulful expression to his performance that no one else matches. His voice and singing style are inimitable. Thank you for this endearing feature on a versatile artist who is too often overlooked.
MAGAZINE
July 28, 2002 | STEVE LOPEZ
More than 30 years ago, I would come home from school and find my mother watching the "Merv Griffin Show" on the Motorola while she did the ironing. I loved it when Merv would call on the trumpet player in Mort Lindsey's orchestra, a chubby-faced cut-up named Jack Sheldon, and goof with him the way Johnny Carson later did with Doc Severinsen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2000 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Having good health makes life worth living, but the folks who really know that are those who have survived serious illness. Take Jack Sheldon, the dynamic trumpeter, singer and comedian who has been a prime participant in the Los Angeles jazz and studio music scene for close to 50 years. "Just to be alive is so great," said Sheldon, who has been in remission from colon cancer for three years. "I'm getting my strength back, but it took all this time. My sound is pretty good.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1991 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Not all of his role as bandleader Wally Fields in Bette Midler's new film, "For the Boys," came naturally to trumpeter and actor Jack Sheldon. He had to rehearse a dance number with co-star Karen Martin in which he moves around the stage with her while playing his horn. "It wasn't really dancing," Sheldon said earlier this week by phone from his Hollywood Hills home, "but walking in time with the rhythm. I'd never done that before--moving around and playing the trumpet. It was tough.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jazz may be the sound of surprise, but it's not just the music that grabs one's attention when Jack Sheldon, the veteran trumpeter-bandleader-actor, makes one of his too-rare appearances. Monday night at Catalina Bar & Grill, he turned up in full regalia, leading his 16-piece big jazz band in a celebration of their eighth anniversary.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Halloween marks an inauspicious anniversary for trumpeter and actor Jack Sheldon. It was two years ago on Halloween that Sheldon found out he had colon cancer. Surgery and a year of chemotherapy followed. Now, Jack is back. "I'm feeling good," the 66-year-old musician said recently by phone from his home in the Hollywood Hills. "I'm getting stronger. It was quite an ordeal, but, considering the alternative . . . ." As proof of that recovery, just look at his schedule for the end of this week.
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