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Jack Shouse

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1988 | DON SHIRLEY
In a 1971 production of "Hamlet," Jack Shouse had only four days to rehearse his role of Guildenstern. On opening night, he went onstage with the first letter of each of his lines written on his hand for easy reference. Nevertheless, this "Hamlet" turned out to be a seminal event--the first time that Santa Maria's Pacific Conservatory of the Performing Arts (PCPA) ventured into Solvang, now the second home of the annual PCPA Theaterfest.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1988 | DON SHIRLEY
In a 1971 production of "Hamlet," Jack Shouse had only four days to rehearse his role of Guildenstern. On opening night, he went onstage with the first letter of each of his lines written on his hand for easy reference. Nevertheless, this "Hamlet" turned out to be a seminal event--the first time that Santa Maria's Pacific Conservatory of the Performing Arts (PCPA) ventured into Solvang, now the second home of the annual PCPA Theaterfest.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1988 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
The PCPA Theaterfest is something of a tradition in the Santa Ynez Valley and the central coast region. Now into its fourth artistic director (Jack Shouse) and its 14th summer of repertory between the Marian Theater of Santa Maria and the Festival Theatre in Solvang, it is offering three musicals and three plays. Left, Sylvie Drake reviews "Sweeney Todd" and "The Tempest."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Here in the land of butter cookies, kringle and the PCPA Theaterfest, a play that's really a screenplay based on another play made its world premiere over the weekend. It is billed as "Alfred Hitchcock's Rope," which it is, and isn't. Allow me to explain. Pat Hitchcock O'Connell, daughter of the director whose silhouette and movies are legendary, is a longtime supporter of the Pacific Conservatory of the Performing Arts and its Solvang Theaterfest.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Here in the land of butter cookies, kringle and the PCPA Theaterfest, a play that's really a screenplay based on another play made its world premiere over the weekend. It is billed as "Alfred Hitchcock's Rope," which it is, and isn't. Allow me to explain. Pat Hitchcock O'Connell, daughter of the director whose silhouette and movies are legendary, is a longtime supporter of the Pacific Conservatory of the Performing Arts and its Solvang Theaterfest.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1986 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
"I'm somewhat of an idealist and an optimist," said George Schaefer, "and the state of TV and film and theater is far from healthy, far from living up to its potential." Schaefer was reflecting on the latest development in a career that began nearly 50 years ago when he directed the Pastime Players in Oak Park, Ill., and now finds itself on the campus of UCLA, where he has been appointed chairman of theater, film and television.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2001
Strings have often provided scenery for the drama of Ray Charles' music, and the genre-crossing legend will have a full arsenal at his disposal after moving on from tonight's club show to the Hollywood Bowl, where he'll be joined by the L.A. Philharmonic, conducted by Victor Vanacore.* Ray Charles, House of Blues Anaheim, 1530 S. Disneyland Drive, Anaheim, 7:30 p.m. $57.50. (714) 778-2583. Also Friday and Saturday at the Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave., Hollywood, 8:30 p.m. $3 to $85.
NEWS
August 4, 1994 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When you stop to think about it, it may not be the greatest show on earth, but "Barnum," the energetic musical loosely based on the life of the preeminent 19th-Century American showman, sets out to ensure that you never get the chance. Even without the safety net of a particularly deep or engrossing story, the show offers enough visual sleights of hand to divert even the most discerning intellects.
NEWS
May 6, 1993 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"We're a very close family," Uncle Ben, the patriarch of the Hubbard clan, tells a Chicago entrepreneur visiting their small Alabama town. And he's right. Ben and his two siblings involve themselves in each others' lives to a degree rarely seen in modern families. Then again, with relatives like these, who needs piranhas? Written in 1939, Lillian Hellman's "The Little Foxes" revealed the all-consuming avarice that strips away any trace of humanity in the Hubbards.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
How about a little fire, Scarecrow? There are pyrotechnics, special effects and plenty of fun to be had at PCPA Theaterfest's "The Wizard of Oz." It's a show that has something for everyone. Even the first-rate performances take a back seat to eye-popping special effects. Fans of the MGM classic will marvel at the ingenuity with which their favorite scenes have been translated to the stage.
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