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Jack Snow

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October 23, 2002 | --Bill Plaschke, From Staff Reports
Two games after his son showed up, Jack Snow made his World Series debut Tuesday, showing up behind the batting cage at Pacific Bell Park to cheer son J.T. while wearing a Giant jacket. "I played in two NFC championship games, and neither one compares to watching your son in the World Series," said Snow, who missed the first two games in Anaheim because he was busy as a broadcaster for the St. Louis Rams. Snow said when the Giants defeated the St.
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SPORTS
January 23, 2006 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
J.T. Snow and his sisters, Michelle and Stephanie, on Saturday at All Souls Cemetery in Long Beach buried their father, Jack, next to their mother, Mary Carol, who died of cancer in 1998. Snow, the former Angel who on Jan. 6 signed a one-year, $2-million contract with the Boston Red Sox, said, "I've asked the Red Sox if I can wear No. 84, and I think they're going to let me." Jack Snow, who died Jan. 9 at 62, wore No. 84 during his 11 seasons with the Los Angeles Rams.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2006 | Shav Glick, Times Staff Writer
Jack Snow, a Pro Bowl split end who played 11 years with the Los Angeles Rams before becoming part of its radio broadcast team, died Monday night. He was 62. Snow, who had been battling a staph infection over the last two months, died at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, said Duane Lewis, a Ram spokesman. A consensus All-American at Notre Dame before becoming the Rams' first draft choice in 1965, Snow played his entire career with Los Angeles before retiring in 1975.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2006
A memorial service for former Los Angeles Ram Jack Snow will be held Saturday at 12:30 p.m. at All Souls Cemetery and Mausoleum, 4400 Cherry Ave., Long Beach. Snow, 62, a Pro Bowl end, died Jan. 9 in St. Louis after battling a staph infection.
SPORTS
May 19, 1994 | LARRY STEWART
Steve Physioc, a Bay Area free-lance play-by-play announcer, will replace Bob Starr and will be joined by Hall of Fame member Deacon Jones on Ram radio broadcasts next season, The Times has learned. Jack Snow will return as a commentator, making it a three-man team. KMPC will continue as the Ram flagship station.
SPORTS
October 19, 2002 | Mike DiGiovanna
His duties as a St. Louis Ram broadcaster will prevent him from attending Games 1 and 2 of the World Series in Anaheim, but Jack Snow will be in San Francisco to watch his son, Giant first baseman J.T. Snow, in Games 3, 4 and 5. And he will even talk to his son. That might come as a surprise to those who knew of J.T.'s estrangement from his parents, a family split that resulted in Snow's not talking to his father or his mother, Mary Carol, from 1996 to early 1998.
SPORTS
June 12, 1989
J.T. Snow, who attended Los Alamitos High School and the University of Arizona, has signed with the New York Yankees. Snow, a junior first baseman, was a fifth-round choice of the Yankees in baseball's amateur draft. A three-year starter at Arizona, he hit .350 with 10 home runs and 58 RBIs this season. He will be assigned to Oneonta of the New York-Penn League. He is the son of former Rams wide receiver Jack Snow.
SPORTS
February 28, 1993 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First baseman J.T. Snow gingerly walked into the Angel clubhouse, lowered his head, and tried to blend into the crowd. He was doing what his dad had told him, but it proved futile. His new teammates gawked at him, nudging one another and whispered. So, this is the guy. This is what we got for Jim Abbott. It doesn't seem to matter that there are two pitchers who came with Snow from the New York Yankees for Abbott. It's unimportant that Snow has played only seven major league games.
SPORTS
January 23, 2006 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
J.T. Snow and his sisters, Michelle and Stephanie, on Saturday at All Souls Cemetery in Long Beach buried their father, Jack, next to their mother, Mary Carol, who died of cancer in 1998. Snow, the former Angel who on Jan. 6 signed a one-year, $2-million contract with the Boston Red Sox, said, "I've asked the Red Sox if I can wear No. 84, and I think they're going to let me." Jack Snow, who died Jan. 9 at 62, wore No. 84 during his 11 seasons with the Los Angeles Rams.
SPORTS
October 16, 1985 | BRIAN HILDERBRAND
In its first four games, Los Alamitos High School didn't have a chance to execute its two-minute offense, though the Griffins practice it each week. But in an Empire League game against Esperanza last Thursday, the Griffins (5-0) finally put their two-minute offense to the test. Quarterback J.T. Snow drove the Griffins 77 yards on 7 plays in the final 41 seconds. He threw a 17-yard scoring pass to wide receiver Robby Katzaroff, giving Los Alamitos its first win ever over the Aztecs, 24-21.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2006 | Shav Glick, Times Staff Writer
Jack Snow, a Pro Bowl split end who played 11 years with the Los Angeles Rams before becoming part of its radio broadcast team, died Monday night. He was 62. Snow, who had been battling a staph infection over the last two months, died at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, said Duane Lewis, a Ram spokesman. A consensus All-American at Notre Dame before becoming the Rams' first draft choice in 1965, Snow played his entire career with Los Angeles before retiring in 1975.
SPORTS
October 23, 2002 | --Bill Plaschke, From Staff Reports
Two games after his son showed up, Jack Snow made his World Series debut Tuesday, showing up behind the batting cage at Pacific Bell Park to cheer son J.T. while wearing a Giant jacket. "I played in two NFC championship games, and neither one compares to watching your son in the World Series," said Snow, who missed the first two games in Anaheim because he was busy as a broadcaster for the St. Louis Rams. Snow said when the Giants defeated the St.
SPORTS
October 19, 2002 | Mike DiGiovanna, Times Staff Writer
J.T. Snow, a six-time Gold Glove Award-winning first baseman who has averaged 17 homers and 76 runs batted in during a 10-year career, in exchange for Allen Watson, who went 51-55 in an eight-year career, 18-17 in Anaheim from 1997-98, and who will go down in Angel lore as the pitcher who nearly killed himself while opening a beer bottle. This is what happens when front-office executives make knee-jerk decisions based more on perception than reality.
SPORTS
October 19, 2002 | Mike DiGiovanna
His duties as a St. Louis Ram broadcaster will prevent him from attending Games 1 and 2 of the World Series in Anaheim, but Jack Snow will be in San Francisco to watch his son, Giant first baseman J.T. Snow, in Games 3, 4 and 5. And he will even talk to his son. That might come as a surprise to those who knew of J.T.'s estrangement from his parents, a family split that resulted in Snow's not talking to his father or his mother, Mary Carol, from 1996 to early 1998.
SPORTS
July 13, 1997 | JIM MURRAY
The rosters of major league baseball teams today are awash with the second generation of the rich and famous. The prowess of the fathers is passed on to the sons. It's almost like the Hapsburgs or the Romanoffs. A dynasty. The divine right of kings. There never was any Babe Ruth Jr. or Ty Cobb II. There isn't even a Gehrig scion abroad in the lineups, but there is a Ken Griffey Jr. and a Barry Bonds who is really a Bobby Bonds II and there is a Jose Cruz Jr. And there is a J.T. Snow.
SPORTS
November 28, 1996 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Angel career filled with more peaks and valleys than Yosemite came to an end Wednesday when first baseman J.T. Snow was traded to the San Francisco Giants for pitcher Allen Watson and double-A pitcher Fausto Macey. The deal should bolster the Angel rotation--Watson, 26, went 8-12 with a 4.61 earned-run average in 1996, but General Manager Bill Bavasi believes the left-hander will eventually develop into a No.
SPORTS
October 19, 2002 | Mike DiGiovanna, Times Staff Writer
J.T. Snow, a six-time Gold Glove Award-winning first baseman who has averaged 17 homers and 76 runs batted in during a 10-year career, in exchange for Allen Watson, who went 51-55 in an eight-year career, 18-17 in Anaheim from 1997-98, and who will go down in Angel lore as the pitcher who nearly killed himself while opening a beer bottle. This is what happens when front-office executives make knee-jerk decisions based more on perception than reality.
SPORTS
November 28, 1996 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Angel career filled with more peaks and valleys than Yosemite came to an end Wednesday when first baseman J.T. Snow was traded to the San Francisco Giants for pitcher Allen Watson and double-A pitcher Fausto Macey. The deal should bolster the Angel rotation--Watson, 26, went 8-12 with a 4.61 earned-run average in 1996, but General Manager Bill Bavasi believes the left-hander will eventually develop into a No.
SPORTS
March 21, 1996 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angel first baseman J.T. Snow is a rational guy, a down-to-earth type who says his wife finds him "pretty boring at times." A thrill-seeker he's not. He doesn't sky-dive or drive race cars in the off-season. His closest flirtation with danger was a recent attempt at surfing.
SPORTS
August 31, 1995 | LON EUBANKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Snow awakened one morning this week in Chesterfield, Mo., walked out the back door of his leased home and quickly was reminded he is no longer living in Seal Beach. The blast of humidity was almost like a jarring tackle. It left no question that this was St. Louis in the summertime. It's a city where the radio announcers buzz in August about the heat index, a combined reading of the temperature and the wilting humidity.
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