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Jack Spound

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March 2, 1993 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I absolutely would not do it again, if I knew then what I know now." So says developer Jonathan A. (Jack) Spound, 34, about his eight-year effort to erect Warner Ridge, a $200-million office-condominium project planned in Woodland Hills across the street from Warner Center.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1994 | JOHN SCHWADA and KURT PITZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As new details of the apparent collapse of the San Fernando Valley's massive Warner Ridge office project emerged Tuesday, Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan and Councilwoman Laura Chick scrambled to keep one of the Valley's major employers from leaving and taking about 1,500 jobs. After a long, costly lawsuit and eight years of Byzantine maneuverings through the City Hall bureaucracy, groundbreaking had seemed imminent for the $100-million, 690,000-square-foot complex.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1991
Los Angeles city attorneys claim to have new evidence of a secret $200,000 deal cut by developer Jack Spound to gain Pierce College's support for the controversial office project he wanted to build on land adjacent to the school's Woodland Hills campus. The payment was never made and would not have been illegal. But city attorneys say they want to learn more about the deal in order to defend the city from a lawsuit brought by the developer. Spound and his partner, Johnson Wax Development Corp.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1993 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I absolutely would not do it again, if I knew then what I know now." So says developer Jonathan A. (Jack) Spound, 34, about his eight-year effort to erect Warner Ridge, a $200-million office-condominium project planned in Woodland Hills across the street from Warner Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1991
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday rejected a proposal to ask a judge to work out a compromise settlement of the lawsuit between the city and the would-be developer of the 21.5-acre Warner Ridge site in Woodland Hills. Councilwoman Joy Picus, who represents the area, said the council decided in a private session that settling the lawsuit is premature. The partnership of Spound Cos. and Johnson Wax Development Co., owners of Warner Ridge, proposed the non-binding settlement process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1989
I hope Planning Commissioners Theodore Stein Jr., Fernando Torres-Gil and President William G. Luddy are satisfied! I hope they sleep well night after night. They have just (May 11) perpetrated the most unconscionable betrayal of public trust imaginable. They can now sit back and rub their hands in glee as three seven-story buildings, two five-story buildings, one four-story building, one three-story building, a restaurant and a parking structure for 3,000 cars rises on the corner of De Soto and Oxnard in Woodland Hills!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1989 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
A Wisconsin-based development company that has spent nearly three years fighting for permission to help build a $150-million Woodland Hills office project said Wednesday it is getting out of the construction business. But officials of the Johnson Wax Development Corp. said they intend to start--and finish--the Warner Ridge high-rise office project at the northeast corner of De Soto Avenue and Oxnard Street before halting land-development activities. Johnson Wax is a partner with Los Angeles-based Spound Co. in the seven-building project, which is expected to receive final Los Angeles Planning Commission approval today at a meeting in Van Nuys, setting the stage for a City Council debate on the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1991 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles city attorneys claim to have new evidence of a secret $200,000 deal cut by developer Jack Spound to gain Pierce College's support for the controversial office project he wanted to build on land next to the school's Woodland Hills campus. The payment was never made and would not have been illegal. But city attorneys Tuesday said they want to learn more about the deal to defend the city from a lawsuit brought by the developer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1994 | JOHN SCHWADA and KURT PITZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As new details of the apparent collapse of the San Fernando Valley's massive Warner Ridge office project emerged Tuesday, Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan and Councilwoman Laura Chick scrambled to keep one of the Valley's major employers from leaving and taking about 1,500 jobs. After a long, costly lawsuit and eight years of Byzantine maneuverings through the City Hall bureaucracy, groundbreaking had seemed imminent for the $100-million, 690,000-square-foot complex.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1991 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Developers of the Warner Ridge property are in default on a $43-million real estate loan and were accused in a lawsuit this week of violating federal racketeering statutes to obtain the money. The Warner Ridge developers have been in default since last October on the loan to finance the planned construction of seven mid-rise office towers on 21.5 acres in Woodland Hills, according to a lawsuit filed by Morgan Guaranty Trust of New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1992 | MAYERENE BARKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What on earth does Pierce College want with 425,000 cubic yards of dirt? That's what neighbors of the Woodland Hills campus wanted to know when they learned that the college had been negotiating with developer Jack Spound, who wants to dump at Pierce the dirt he plans to bulldoze from ridgelines for his $200-million Warner Ridge development. "That's enough dirt to fill a football field 200 feet high," said Margo Murman, president of the Coalition to Revitalize and Preserve Pierce College Farm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1991
Los Angeles city attorneys claim to have new evidence of a secret $200,000 deal cut by developer Jack Spound to gain Pierce College's support for the controversial office project he wanted to build on land adjacent to the school's Woodland Hills campus. The payment was never made and would not have been illegal. But city attorneys say they want to learn more about the deal in order to defend the city from a lawsuit brought by the developer. Spound and his partner, Johnson Wax Development Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1991 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles city attorneys claim to have new evidence of a secret $200,000 deal cut by developer Jack Spound to gain Pierce College's support for the controversial office project he wanted to build on land next to the school's Woodland Hills campus. The payment was never made and would not have been illegal. But city attorneys Tuesday said they want to learn more about the deal to defend the city from a lawsuit brought by the developer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1991 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Developer Jack Spound said he thought that he had built a cordial, trusting relationship with Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky in the months preceding the January, 1990, vote that would determine the fate of his $150-million Warner Ridge office project. Spound said the West Los Angeles councilman, whose district includes Sherman Oaks, had asked him to help raise money for Yaroslavsky's mayoral bid and Spound had done so, collecting about $17,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1991 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles City Councilwoman Joy Picus says proudly that she was championing the views of her constituents when she helped block the proposed Warner Ridge office complex in Woodland Hills. But depositions in a $100-million lawsuit concerning the hotly debated project make clear that the will of the public on such matters is fickle and evanescent, and that divining public opinion is subjective, inexact and fraught with political risks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1991 | MICHAEL CONNELLY and RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles city attorney asked a judge Wednesday to stop the release of depositions made by city officials in the Warner Ridge lawsuit, but opposing attorneys said the request was an attempt to prevent the exposure of politically embarrassing comments made by City Council members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1991 | MICHAEL CONNELLY and RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles city attorney asked a judge Wednesday to stop the release of depositions made by city officials in the Warner Ridge lawsuit, but opposing attorneys said the request was an attempt to prevent the exposure of politically embarrassing comments made by City Council members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1991 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The controversial testimony of Councilwoman Joy Picus in a bitter lawsuit filed against the city by a developer has brought into sharp focus the emerging debate over how significant a role politics ought to play in Los Angeles' planning process. Her statements made public last week, and those of other city leaders asked to react to them, indicate that political considerations are often the key to decisions about where and how houses, apartments, offices and commercial centers are built.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1991 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The controversial testimony of Councilwoman Joy Picus in a bitter lawsuit filed against the city by a developer has brought into sharp focus the emerging debate over how significant a role politics ought to play in Los Angeles' planning process. Her statements made public last week, and those of other city leaders asked to react to them, indicate that political considerations are often the key to decisions about where and how houses, apartments, offices and commercial centers are built.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1991 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Developers of the Warner Ridge property are in default on a $43-million real estate loan and were accused in a lawsuit this week of violating federal racketeering statutes to obtain the money. The Warner Ridge developers have been in default since last October on the loan to finance the planned construction of seven mid-rise office towers on 21.5 acres in Woodland Hills, according to a lawsuit filed by Morgan Guaranty Trust of New York.
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