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Jack Squirek

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SPORTS
January 28, 1996 | T.J. SIMERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Squirek. If the man does nothing else in life--and for the rest of his career as a football player he didn't--the name will forever be recognizable: "Yeah, that guy who intercepted a pass and scored a touchdown in the Super Bowl." A nobody becomes somebody. "The week before the game all the players were available for the reporters, who were looking for Marcus Allen, Jim Plunkett, Howie Long and guys like that," Squirek said. "Ed Muransky and I sat at the same table: We played cards a lot.
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SPORTS
January 28, 1996 | T.J. SIMERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Squirek. If the man does nothing else in life--and for the rest of his career as a football player he didn't--the name will forever be recognizable: "Yeah, that guy who intercepted a pass and scored a touchdown in the Super Bowl." A nobody becomes somebody. "The week before the game all the players were available for the reporters, who were looking for Marcus Allen, Jim Plunkett, Howie Long and guys like that," Squirek said. "Ed Muransky and I sat at the same table: We played cards a lot.
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SPORTS
November 14, 1988 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
It's too soon to know if any of these guys will ride a horse on the practice field (as Ted Hendricks did), or scream "I'll kill you and everything you love!" (Lyle Alzado), or join the opposing huddle for a drink (Howie Long), but let's leave legend-making to the future. For the present, young and heretofore anonymous Raiders named Mike Wise and Scott Davis led a surge that swallowed the San Francisco 49ers offense in a 9-3 victory that was as significant as it was surprising.
SPORTS
August 1, 1987 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
If he had eyes in the back of his head, Jack Squirek might still be here. But then, if Joe Theismann had eyes in the back of his head, we might never have met Jack Squirek. Squirek's football life was marked by two plays. During the 1984 Super Bowl, he stepped in front of a screen pass thrown by Theismann and stepped into the end zone. The touchdown gave his team a 21-3 lead over the Washington Redskins at halftime. His Raider teammates mobbed him.
SPORTS
July 28, 1987 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
If he had eyes in the back of his head, Jack Squirek might be here right now. But then, if Joe Theismann had eyes in the back of his head, we might never have met Jack Squirek. His football life was marked by two plays. During the 1984 Super Bowl, he stepped in front of a Theismann screen pass and stepped into the end zone. The touchdown gave his team a 21-3 lead at halftime. His Raider teammates mobbed him. He had gone from zone coverage to the cover of Sports Illustrated.
SPORTS
August 8, 1985 | JIM MURRAY
In football lore, Johnny (One Play) O'Brien was a Notre Dame end who caught a touchdown pass on a 78-yard play that beat Army in the fourth quarter in 1928 at Yankee Stadium while 78,188 people went mildly crazy. It was the only down he played in that game and one of the few he ever played. He was a spindly hurdler and hardly even a part-time player. He was known as One Play ever after--he died in a car crash a few years later--but he was overlooked even then.
SPORTS
November 14, 1988 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
It's too soon to know if any of these guys will ride a horse on the practice field (as Ted Hendricks did), or scream "I'll kill you and everything you love!" (Lyle Alzado), or join the opposing huddle for a drink (Howie Long), but let's leave legend-making to the future. For the present, young and heretofore anonymous Raiders named Mike Wise and Scott Davis led a surge that swallowed the San Francisco 49ers offense in a 9-3 victory that was as significant as it was surprising.
SPORTS
April 21, 1987 | Associated Press
Free-agent linebacker Jack Squirek was signed Monday by the Chargers, a club spokesman said. Squirek, from Illinois, was drafted by the Los Angeles Raiders in the second round of the 1982 NFL draft. Squirek, 6-feet 4-inches, 240 pounds, is best known for intercepting a Joe Theismann pass and returning it five yards for a touchdown in the Raiders' 38-9 victory over Washington in Super Bowl XVII. Squirek played two games for Miami last season after being released by the Raiders.
SPORTS
August 9, 1985 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
The Raiders Thursday began winding down their practice in preparation for Saturday's exhibition opener against the San Francisco 49ers, and Coach Tom Flores gave an informal state of the team address. Highlighted were the positions that are most up for grabs. Inside linebacker, where Matt Millen was thought to be safe and Jack Squirek is chasing Bob Nelson: "There's a real battle going on. Millen and Nelson are the incumbents.
SPORTS
August 1, 1987 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
If he had eyes in the back of his head, Jack Squirek might still be here. But then, if Joe Theismann had eyes in the back of his head, we might never have met Jack Squirek. Squirek's football life was marked by two plays. During the 1984 Super Bowl, he stepped in front of a screen pass thrown by Theismann and stepped into the end zone. The touchdown gave his team a 21-3 lead over the Washington Redskins at halftime. His Raider teammates mobbed him.
SPORTS
July 28, 1987 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
If he had eyes in the back of his head, Jack Squirek might be here right now. But then, if Joe Theismann had eyes in the back of his head, we might never have met Jack Squirek. His football life was marked by two plays. During the 1984 Super Bowl, he stepped in front of a Theismann screen pass and stepped into the end zone. The touchdown gave his team a 21-3 lead at halftime. His Raider teammates mobbed him. He had gone from zone coverage to the cover of Sports Illustrated.
SPORTS
August 8, 1985 | JIM MURRAY
In football lore, Johnny (One Play) O'Brien was a Notre Dame end who caught a touchdown pass on a 78-yard play that beat Army in the fourth quarter in 1928 at Yankee Stadium while 78,188 people went mildly crazy. It was the only down he played in that game and one of the few he ever played. He was a spindly hurdler and hardly even a part-time player. He was known as One Play ever after--he died in a car crash a few years later--but he was overlooked even then.
SPORTS
August 20, 1985 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
On Monday, the Raiders found one more thing they didn't like about Sunday's exhibition loss to the Washington Redskins. Veteran inside linebacker Bob Nelson underwent arthroscopic surgery for removal of a piece of bone from his right knee and will be out for at least four weeks. That leaves his spot to be fought over by four-year veteran Jack Squirek and rookie Reggie McKenzie, the 10th-round pick who has been the surprise of camp.
SPORTS
September 3, 1985 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
So much for the preseason. The Raiders got down to the 45-man roster the hard way, by cutting their leading rusher in exhibitions, rookie fullback Dan Reeder. With him went veteran wide receiver Gordon Jones, who'd also been impressive in camp and in his limited playing time, and offensive guard Dwight Wheeler. Rookie cornerback Stefon Adams made the injured reserve list with a hamstring pull.
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