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Jack Terrell

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NEWS
October 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An American who once worked as a mercenary for the Contras in Nicaragua said he was hired in 1990 by Raul Manglapus, the foreign secretary of the Philippines, to kill a rebel leader who opposes President Corazon Aquino. The assassination never took place, but Jack Terrell said in an interview on ABC-TV that he decided to make the story public because he believes that it eventually would surface. Terrell said he was hired for $30,000 to organize a squad to kill Lt. Col.
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NEWS
October 18, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bizarre story worthy of a spy thriller, the Philippine foreign secretary Thursday denied allegations that he hired an American mercenary, a minor figure in the Iran-Contra scandal, to assassinate rebel leaders trying to overthrow President Corazon Aquino. Raul Manglapus, at times visibly shaken, told a crowded news conference that a tape recording in which he allegedly discussed the murder plot was an elaborate hoax.
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NEWS
July 26, 1988 | United Press International
A munitions expert pleaded not guilty Monday to charges he violated the Neutrality Act by training Nicaraguan Contras and said the Reagan Administration has made him a scapegoat for an Oliver L. North operation. Jack Terrell, 47, said he was the head field adviser for a military training operation in Honduras between October, 1984, and March, 1985. He said he worked with the knowledge and approval of the U.S. government.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An American who once worked as a mercenary for the Contras in Nicaragua said he was hired in 1990 by Raul Manglapus, the foreign secretary of the Philippines, to kill a rebel leader who opposes President Corazon Aquino. The assassination never took place, but Jack Terrell said in an interview on ABC-TV that he decided to make the story public because he believes that it eventually would surface. Terrell said he was hired for $30,000 to organize a squad to kill Lt. Col.
NEWS
October 18, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bizarre story worthy of a spy thriller, the Philippine foreign secretary Thursday denied allegations that he hired an American mercenary, a minor figure in the Iran-Contra scandal, to assassinate rebel leaders trying to overthrow President Corazon Aquino. Raul Manglapus, at times visibly shaken, told a crowded news conference that a tape recording in which he allegedly discussed the murder plot was an elaborate hoax.
NEWS
April 25, 1988 | United Press International
Lt. Col. Oliver L. North may have lied to FBI agents in May, 1986, to get them to investigate people he believed threatened to expose his secret Contra aid network, newly released FBI documents and sources close to the inquiry say. North told the FBI he had been followed, that his car was vandalized and his dog poisoned, the documents showed. He also said key associates in his Contra aid network were being sued in a bid to disrupt their support for the rebels.
NEWS
October 28, 1988 | Associated Press
Two men accused of violating U.S. law by illegally aiding the Nicaraguan Contras regularly briefed the FBI and intelligence agencies about their activities, according to documents released in a criminal case. The documents also indicate that Miami police informed the FBI in September, 1984, of the existence of the Contra-supporting group and that drug-trafficking money was being used to finance the Contra cause. The FBI in turn was sending its reports to Oliver L.
NEWS
December 3, 1988 | Associated Press
Six Contra supporters accused of attacking Nicaragua urged a judge Friday to dismiss their case on grounds that the United States has been waging a de facto war against the Sandinistas. They asked U.S. District Judge Norman C. Roettger to throw out an indictment accusing them of violating the U.S. Neutrality Act by recruiting mercenaries and launching operations against the Sandinista government in Nicaragua from U.S. soil in 1985.
NEWS
July 13, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The brother of Nicaraguan Contra leader Adolfo Calero and six others have been indicted on charges they conspired to unlawfully recruit mercenaries to serve in the anti-Sandinista rebel army, the Justice Department announced today. The long-awaited indictment did not mention any Reagan Administration officials or Calero himself. According to the indictment, returned June 28 in U.S. District Court in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
NEWS
July 26, 1988 | United Press International
A munitions expert pleaded not guilty Monday to charges he violated the Neutrality Act by training Nicaraguan Contras and said the Reagan Administration has made him a scapegoat for an Oliver L. North operation. Jack Terrell, 47, said he was the head field adviser for a military training operation in Honduras between October, 1984, and March, 1985. He said he worked with the knowledge and approval of the U.S. government.
NEWS
August 23, 1988 | Associated Press
Six Cuban-Americans ran a mercenary training camp in Florida to aid Nicaraguan rebels, according to a federal indictment unsealed Monday. One of the six is also accused of shipping a cannon, a mortar and other weapons to the Contras under the guise of humanitarian aid. The Miami-area men allegedly violated the Neutrality Act, which bans private action against a government at peace with the United States.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1996 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
* The Blue Crew Won't See Any Green The Police Expo is calling. Consumers with a charitable bent had better beware. "Hello, ma'am. I'm calling with the Police Expo. This is a friendly call. How are you?" starts a phone call that is clearly revving up to solicit funds. The caller then continues a pitch that asks consumers to "help us out" by buying at least one $20 ticket.
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