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Jack The Ripper

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NEWS
October 8, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL and PATT MORRISON, Times Staff Writers
"No one who was living in London that autumn will forget the terror created by these murders. Even now I can recall the foggy evenings and hear again the raucous cry of the newspaper boys: 'Another horrible murder . . . .' " -- Sir Melville Macnaghten Assistant commissioner of London's Metropolitan Police Department in late 1880s. His reign lasted barely 10 weeks and was confined to a neglected slum in London's East End.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Paula L. Woods
The 1888-91 Whitechapel murders in London are arguably the world's most infamous unsolved serial crimes. The brutal murders of as few as five to almost a dozen young women attributed to "Jack the Ripper" have spawned thousands of nonfiction accounts and casebooks, so many that the term "ripperology" was coined to describe the study of the murders by professionals and amateurs. Fictional accounts of the Ripper murders also abound, including tales that pit Jack the Ripper against Sherlock Holmes and, most recently, Isabel Allende's novel "Ripper," which involves teenage sleuths who use computer gaming to track a modern-day Ripper terrorizing San Francisco.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2005 | From Associated Press
Bestselling American crime writer Patricia Cornwell has taken out full-page newspaper ads to defend her investigation into solving a 19th century killing spree. The ads in two British national newspapers on Saturday came days after one of the papers accused her of having an "obsession" with the Jack the Ripper case.
WORLD
September 20, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
It's been called the world's most famous cold case, a source of endless fascination and speculation ever since the first mutilated victim was found in a bloody heap 123 years ago on the gas-lighted streets of East London. So why is Scotland Yard suppressing information that some crime buffs think could offer fresh leads on the identity of Britain's most notorious serial killer, Jack the Ripper? That's the question baffling Trevor Marriott, a retired homicide detective who's been waging a solitary legal battle to force "the Yard" to release uncensored versions of information recorded in thick Victorian ledgers that are gathering dust in an official archive.
NEWS
August 20, 1988 | United Press International
Jack the Ripper, who savagely killed five London women a century ago, wrote in blood-red ink, "I love my work," and vowed to mutilate prostitutes until he was caught, according to a letter released by Scotland Yard. "I am down on whores and I shan't quit ripping them until I do get buckled," said the letter signed Jack the Ripper that was sent to a London news agency. "My knife's so nice and sharp I want to get to work right away if I get a chance."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
"Jack's Back" (citywide) is a psychological shocker that carves up the Jack the Ripper legend in convoluted but predictable ways. It's set in a modern-day Los Angeles onto which a strange, nacreous half-fog seems to have descended, indoors and out. There, a copycat killer is duplicating the Ripper's modus operandi to the last slash.
NEWS
September 8, 1993 | From The Washington Post
Warner Books Inc. on Tuesday canceled "The Diary of Jack the Ripper," one month before 200,000 copies of the Victorian serial killer's purported ramblings were to go on sale. What was once touted by the publisher as the historical find of the century has collapsed into a hoax. "It's so deadly obvious from every way you look.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2010
Jack the Ripper's Secret Confession The Hidden Testimony of Britain's First Serial Killer David Monaghan and Nigel Cawthorne Skyhorse Publishing: 336 pp., $24.95
WORLD
September 20, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
It's been called the world's most famous cold case, a source of endless fascination and speculation ever since the first mutilated victim was found in a bloody heap 123 years ago on the gas-lighted streets of East London. So why is Scotland Yard suppressing information that some crime buffs think could offer fresh leads on the identity of Britain's most notorious serial killer, Jack the Ripper? That's the question baffling Trevor Marriott, a retired homicide detective who's been waging a solitary legal battle to force "the Yard" to release uncensored versions of information recorded in thick Victorian ledgers that are gathering dust in an official archive.
BOOKS
February 2, 2003 | Eugen Weber, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review.
Patricia Cornwell has worked as a police reporter for the North Carolina Charlotte Observer, as a computer analyst for the chief medical examiner in Richmond, Va., and as a volunteer police officer. But she is best known for the wonderful and wonderfully scary crime novels that feature a forensic master, Dr. Kay Scarpetta. In "Portrait of a Killer," she shifts her criminal expertise from contemporary Virginia to late 19th century London.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2010 | By Martin Rubin
Even with the whole of the 20th century and a decade of the 21st separating us from the Victorians, that era continues to fascinate, as the success of director Guy Ritchie's recent Sherlock Holmes movie shows. No wonder, for few other periods offer such a wealth of contrasts. On the surface, there was all that respectability and propriety embodied in the starchy image of the queen, a time when it was actually thought proper to cover the legs of pianos as well as women lest they appear too suggestive.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2009 | Tim Rutten
Arthur Conan Doyle famously tired of Sherlock Holmes and repeatedly tried to end the series of stories featuring the detective he dismissively called "my most notorious character." On each occasion, though, an intense popular clamor -- and the opportunity it afforded to shore up the author's shaky finances -- coaxed Conan Doyle into an additional sequence of stories. Holmes' adventures total four novels and 56 short stories.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2005 | From Associated Press
Bestselling American crime writer Patricia Cornwell has taken out full-page newspaper ads to defend her investigation into solving a 19th century killing spree. The ads in two British national newspapers on Saturday came days after one of the papers accused her of having an "obsession" with the Jack the Ripper case.
BOOKS
February 2, 2003 | Eugen Weber, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review.
Patricia Cornwell has worked as a police reporter for the North Carolina Charlotte Observer, as a computer analyst for the chief medical examiner in Richmond, Va., and as a volunteer police officer. But she is best known for the wonderful and wonderfully scary crime novels that feature a forensic master, Dr. Kay Scarpetta. In "Portrait of a Killer," she shifts her criminal expertise from contemporary Virginia to late 19th century London.
NEWS
July 8, 1995 | JEFF BRAZIL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only so often does a killer like the Unabomber come along who has the desire--and the chutzpah--to play hob with the law. When Edmund Kemper III was being sought for a series of slayings in the early 1970s in Santa Cruz, the 6-foot-9 construction worker would boldly visit cafes that police officers frequented and eavesdrop on their conversations. At one point, he even phoned one of the detectives working the case.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dispassionate, plodding opening statement laced with crime scene photographs that moved relatives of some victims to near collapse, the prosecution Monday opened its case against accused Riverside County serial killer William L. Suff. Deputy Dist. Atty. Paul Zellerbach likened Suff, 44, to serial killers Jack the Ripper and Ted Bundy, linking the onetime county employee to the deaths of 13 prostitutes over a 2 1/2-year killing rampage that ended in December, 1991.
BOOKS
May 19, 1991 | Michael Harris, Harris is a Times staff writer
Real murderers' minds are black holes that emit no light. The thousand pages of Norman Mailer's "The Executioner's Song" dwindle to the unanswered question of why Gary Gilmore shot two of the people he robbed. The last half of Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood" collapses because the drifters who massacred a Kansas family are unequal to their crime.
NEWS
December 27, 1993 | MICHAEL HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rene Belletto gives us fair warning. On Page 5 of this thriller about a French psychologist who invents a machine that allows him to literally get inside a patient's head, the hero's wife, Marie Lacroix, is described as having a body "just as perfect, just as firm and supple, at 35 as it had been at 25." Well, well, we think. Perfect bodies abound on the pages of Playboy, but not in serious literature. Then, on Page 10, the hero, Dr.
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