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Jack Thompson

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS
He wears a Batman watch. He drinks from a Batman mug. A large poster of the Caped Crusader is taped to his refrigerator door. "Batman is just a metaphor I use to explain why what I've done has been received so well by some people," says Jack Thompson, the real-life crusading attorney who instigated the campaign that resulted in rap group 2 Live Crew's "As Nasty as They Wanna Be" album being declared obscene by a federal judge. (See related article, Page 4.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Robert Abele
Raw, unsettling and mesmerizing, the once-thought-lost Australian classic from 1971 "Wake in Fright" has been restored, and this grimly propulsive work, often cited as auguring the continent's arrival as a cinema powerhouse, merits attention. As charged as a nightmare, the adaptation of Kenneth Cook's novel chronicles the lost weekend of a young, soft-featured British schoolteacher named John Grant (Gary Bond) stuck - willfully or not, it could be argued - in "The Yabba," an Outback mining town of hard men who take seriously their entreaties for you to join them in drink after drink.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1990
With regard to Thompson's "Bruce and Luther can go to hell" comment (in Philips' "Boss Apparently OKs Crew's Use of 'U.S.A.,' " June 26): Let's see, on one hand we have Bruce Springsteen and Luther Campbell in hell, and on the other hand we presumably have Jack Thompson ascending to heaven. Never has hell been made to sound so attractive. JEFF BERKE Los Angeles
NEWS
October 26, 1986
I had very high hopes for "The Last Frontier" with Linda Evans. I must admit, even caked with Australian red dust of the outback, Evans is a mighty fine looking woman. The scenery was gorgeous, but despite the authentic Australian locations, Jack Thompson, Judy Morris and Toni Lamond, just who were they trying to kid? It definitely was "Dynasty Down Under"! Oh well, I suppose it could have been worse--they could have filmed it in Valencia! Linda L. Simeone, Toluca Lake
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A Voice in the Matter: Obscenity foe Jack Thompson is up in arms over the alleged unauthorized use of his voice on Luther Campbell's new single "Banned in the U.S.A." Thompson told The Times on Thursday that he has alerted the state attorney of Dade County, Fla.--the district where Campbell's company, Luke Records, operates--requesting an investigation into the alleged theft. He also sent a letter to Atlantic Records, asking the company to recall all singles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Listeners Have Thompson's Number: Florida anti-obscenity crusader Jack Thompson received more than a dozen allegedly obscene phone calls from irate Bruce Springsteen fans in Los Angeles Thursday after KSLX-FM (97.1) disc jockey Susie Who announced Thompson's home number on the air. The calls came in response to public remarks made by Thompson on Monday denouncing Springsteen's decision to grant 2 Live Crew leader Luther Campbell the right to use the melody to his 1984 hit "Born in the U.S.A."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Jack Thompson, the Coral Gables, Fla., attorney whose complaint about the 2 Live Crew album put into motion the legal furor centered in Southern Florida, is now asking the federal government to take action against the rap group's record company and its national distributors. In a letter faxed Saturday to U.S. Atty. Gen. Richard Thornburgh, Thompson wrote, " . . . I have had to stand alone on this for so long in the face of nonfeasance by state and federal law enforcement.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1990
Jack Thompson's move against 2 Live Crew began last New Year's Day when he sent letters to both Florida Gov. Bob Martinez and Dade County State Attorney Janet Reno. His demand: an investigation into the possible violation of state obscenity statutes and racketeering codes regarding the rap group's "As Nasty as They Wanna Be" album. Following up on Thompson's request regarding 2 Live Crew, Martinez called for a probe of the group's record company based upon the questions posed in the letter.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A Spanking for Madonna: Jack Thompson, the Florida attorney and anti-obscenity crusader who engineered the campaign against the rap group 2 Live Crew, is now going after Madonna. Thompson is steamed about the Material Girl's latest steamy single "Justify My Love" which he fears will end up in the hands of minors. He is planning several "stings" in an attempt to nab record store owners who sell the record to minors.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Todd (Too Short) Shaw--the latest sexually explicit rapper to be drawn into the growing national debate over obscenity in pop music--makes no bones about what he does for a living. "There's a lot of money in rapping dirty," he says. "We're running a business here. I give my fans what they want."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1990
With regard to Thompson's "Bruce and Luther can go to hell" comment (in Philips' "Boss Apparently OKs Crew's Use of 'U.S.A.,' " June 26): Let's see, on one hand we have Bruce Springsteen and Luther Campbell in hell, and on the other hand we presumably have Jack Thompson ascending to heaven. Never has hell been made to sound so attractive. JEFF BERKE Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Listeners Have Thompson's Number: Florida anti-obscenity crusader Jack Thompson received more than a dozen allegedly obscene phone calls from irate Bruce Springsteen fans in Los Angeles Thursday after KSLX-FM (97.1) disc jockey Susie Who announced Thompson's home number on the air. The calls came in response to public remarks made by Thompson on Monday denouncing Springsteen's decision to grant 2 Live Crew leader Luther Campbell the right to use the melody to his 1984 hit "Born in the U.S.A."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Bruce Springsteen has apparently given permission to the controversial rap group 2 Live Crew to use the melody from his hit song "Born in the U.S.A." for its new single "Banned in the U.S.A."--an action that was immediately attacked by Florida anti-obscenity crusader Jack Thompson. Alan Jacobi, 2 Live Crew's attorney, said Monday that Springsteen has reviewed the content of 2 Live Crew's recording and "enthusiastically" approved the use of his music.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1990
Jack Thompson's move against 2 Live Crew began last New Year's Day when he sent letters to both Florida Gov. Bob Martinez and Dade County State Attorney Janet Reno. His demand: an investigation into the possible violation of state obscenity statutes and racketeering codes regarding the rap group's "As Nasty as They Wanna Be" album. Following up on Thompson's request regarding 2 Live Crew, Martinez called for a probe of the group's record company based upon the questions posed in the letter.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Todd (Too Short) Shaw--the latest sexually explicit rapper to be drawn into the growing national debate over obscenity in pop music--makes no bones about what he does for a living. "There's a lot of money in rapping dirty," he says. "We're running a business here. I give my fans what they want."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS
He wears a Batman watch. He drinks from a Batman mug. A large poster of the Caped Crusader is taped to his refrigerator door. "Batman is just a metaphor I use to explain why what I've done has been received so well by some people," says Jack Thompson, the real-life crusading attorney who instigated the campaign that resulted in rap group 2 Live Crew's "As Nasty as They Wanna Be" album being declared obscene by a federal judge. (See related article, Page 4.
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