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Jack Tramiel

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August 16, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
Atari Corp. Chairman Jack Tramiel, embroiled in a bitter dispute over his firm's 1987 buyout of the Federated Group retail chain, defended in court Tuesday his refusal to pay nearly $600,000 in severance and benefits to two executives ousted from Federated.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Jack Tramiel, the tough and aggressive Commodore International founder who brought millions of people into the world of personal computers in the late 1970s and early '80s with his low-cost PCs, has died. He was 83. Tramiel, who lived in Monte Sereno, Calif., died Sunday at Stanford Hospital in Palo Alto , said his son, Leonard. He had been suffering from congestive heart failure for many years. A Polish-born survivor of the Auschwitz concentration camp who began his business career with a typewriter repair shop in the Bronx in the early 1950s, Tramiel (pronounced tra-MELL)
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BUSINESS
January 8, 1985 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Computer businessman Jack Tramiel, who acquired the money-losing Atari home-computer and video-game business from Warner Communications Inc. last summer, shifted his battle for survival to the industry's largest trade show last weekend, demonstrating a computer priced far below its closest competitor, the Macintosh, produced by Apple Computer Inc.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
Atari Corp. Chairman Jack Tramiel, embroiled in a bitter dispute over his firm's 1987 buyout of the Federated Group retail chain, defended in court Tuesday his refusal to pay nearly $600,000 in severance and benefits to two executives ousted from Federated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Jack Tramiel, the tough and aggressive Commodore International founder who brought millions of people into the world of personal computers in the late 1970s and early '80s with his low-cost PCs, has died. He was 83. Tramiel, who lived in Monte Sereno, Calif., died Sunday at Stanford Hospital in Palo Alto , said his son, Leonard. He had been suffering from congestive heart failure for many years. A Polish-born survivor of the Auschwitz concentration camp who began his business career with a typewriter repair shop in the Bronx in the early 1950s, Tramiel (pronounced tra-MELL)
BUSINESS
September 29, 1985
Sig Schreyer, vice president and general manger of Sunnyvale-based Atari Corp. left the company after five months following a dispute with Chairman Jack Tramiel. In addition, James Copland, vice president for marketing, resigned to start a new company to provide sales and distribution for software makers. He added that he left on good terms with Tramiel.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1987 | MARTHA GROVES
Hard on the heels of Federated Group's purchase by computer maker Atari, three of the troubled consumer electronics retailer's top executives have resigned. They are Wilfred Schwartz, 59, who was chairman and is expected to become an Atari director; Keith Powell, 42, president, and Michael Pastore, 38, senior vice president of operations. The three apparently tendered their resignations from the City of Commerce company Monday.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1985 | From Dow Jones News Service
Stock in Commodore International Ltd. fell Wednesday in heavy trading after sources in computer industry trade publications speculated that the company will have to lower the price of its popular Commodore 64 to meet competition from Atari Corp.'s 64XE, which was introduced last weekend at the recent Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. The stock fell $0.75 to $15.625, with 918,100 shares trading hands.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1986 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Atari, the computer and video-game manufacturer acquired by businessman Jack Tramiel two years ago, said Thursday that it hopes to sell up to 5 million shares--18% of its common stock--to the public for about $70 million. If the offering proceeds, Atari will pay its former owner, Warner Communications, $36 million in cash and 25% of the company's stock, according to the registration statement filed at the Securities and Exchange Commission.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
After years of testing its luck with a number of small Los Angeles area ad agencies--and even trying to create and place its own ads--the Federated home electronics chain on Friday took its $25-million advertising business to Sacramento. The change, however, caught few ad executives by surprise. The Federated Group was purchased last year by Atari Corp., and the agency it hired--the recently created retail division of DDB Needham Worldwide--creates and places ads for Atari.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1985 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Computer businessman Jack Tramiel, who acquired the money-losing Atari home-computer and video-game business from Warner Communications Inc. last summer, shifted his battle for survival to the industry's largest trade show last weekend, demonstrating a computer priced far below its closest competitor, the Macintosh, produced by Apple Computer Inc.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1985
Warner Communications said its first-quarter income from continuing operations nearly tripled from a year earlier. Warner said it earned $21.5 million in the latest quarter. A year earlier, income from continuing operations was $7.16 million, but a $23.7-million gain from discontinued lines produced net income of $30.9 million. First-quarter revenue climbed 19% to $562.9 million from $471.7 million a year ago.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1987 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
It has been said that the only thing worse than working for Jack Tramiel is trying to compete against him. Tramiel is the 59-year-old concentration camp survivor whose Atari Corp. on Sunday agreed to acquire the City of Commerce-based Federated Group consumer electronics retailing chain for $67.3 million.
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