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Jack Valenti

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1985 | From United Press International
Jack Valenti, head of the Motion Picture Assn. of America, criticized the Canadian government Thursday for refusing to allow Walt Disney Productions to distribute its own films in Canada. Valenti, speaking at a press conference at the Montreal World Film Festival, said he was "puzzled and saddened" by the decision of government investment controllers--acting on behalf of Canadian film distributors--to deny Disney's request.
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BUSINESS
May 10, 2011 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
A bit of the old Jack Valenti pizazz is back at Hollywood's outpost in the nation's capital, thanks to a new silver-haired frontman. More than six years after the legendary lobbyist stepped down, the Motion Picture Assn. of America is reviving his tried-and-true methods of tapping entertainment industry glitz to help the major movie studios make their case to Washington's power brokers. The strategy was on display the night before the recent White House Correspondents Assn.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since the movie rating system has come under increased pressure for modifications to its adults-only X classification, Jack Valenti, president of the Motion Picture Assn. of America, has publicly acknowledged that a change may be coming.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2010 | By Richard Verrier and Joe Flint
The role sounds perfect for a leading man or woman: a charismatic diplomat who hobnobs with the Hollywood elite and powerful politicians. An agent might want to call a George Clooney or a Meryl Streep. Instead, it looks like they're going to have to call central casting. The role of head for the Motion Picture Assn. of America, the lobbying organization of the six major studios that also oversees the movie and TV ratings systems, is proving to be a tough one to fill. No clear star candidates have emerged as front-runners, despite it being widely known for almost a year that Chief Executive Dan Glickman was stepping down last week after five years on the job. Glickman, a former congressman from Kansas and secretary of Agriculture, didn't exactly flash glamour and power.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1989 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Times Staff Writer
Jack Valenti learned the facts of life, Hollywood style, at his first meeting with Lew Wasserman, Arthur Krim, Jack Warner and other studio chiefs who hired him 23 years ago to advance their common interests as president of the Motion Picture Assn. of America. Fresh from Lyndon Johnson's White House, Valenti wanted to talk issues. "Listen, Jack, let's cut through all this," Darryl Zanuck, then head of 20th Century Fox, told him instead. "Your biggest problem is the men around this table."
BUSINESS
December 9, 2005 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
Fifteen months after riding off into the sunset, Jack Valenti has made a temporary U-turn. Hollywood's former top lobbyist, who walked the halls of Congress for 38 years before retiring as head of the Motion Picture Assn. of America in 2004, is back working lawmakers in an effort to head off potential television and cable indecency sanctions. Last week, Valenti, 84, resurfaced on Capitol Hill during a forum organized by Sen.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2007 | Amy Kaufman, Times Staff Writer
It was just the way he would have wanted it, guests chimed in on Thursday afternoon at the ArcLight's Cinerama Dome on Sunset Boulevard, where a slew of Hollywood's elite gathered to fete the legacy of industry mogul Jack Valenti. Valenti, who died in April at 85, is most famously recognized as the longtime president of the Motion Picture Assn. of America. During his tenure, Valenti created and defended the often-controversial rating systems for films.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1993 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES MOVIE EDITOR
The president of Gramercy Pictures fired off a letter Thursday to the heads and marketing presidents at all of the Hollywood studios soliciting support for a protest of what he believes is the Motion Picture Assn. of America's unfair censorship of review quotes in movie ads.
NEWS
October 1, 2000 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Valenti, the 79-year-old president of the Motion Picture Assn. of America, is firmly rooted in another age. Stately in his custom-made French cuffs, he bolsters his staunch defense of the movie industry by quoting the Greek philosopher Heraclitus and the 19th century British statesman Benjamin Disraeli. His "most loving friend in the business" is Kirk Douglas, whose photo (a still from the 1960 movie "Spartacus") hangs on the wall of Valenti's Washington office.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1999 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Smoke and mirrors" is how filmmaker Matt Stone recently described the Motion Picture Assn. of America's movie rating system. "Hypocritical . . . and broken-down," wrote film critic Roger Ebert. "Political artifice," opined Peter Bart, the editor of Variety. "A de facto censorship board," agreed the Broadcast Film Critics Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2007 | Amy Kaufman, Times Staff Writer
It was just the way he would have wanted it, guests chimed in on Thursday afternoon at the ArcLight's Cinerama Dome on Sunset Boulevard, where a slew of Hollywood's elite gathered to fete the legacy of industry mogul Jack Valenti. Valenti, who died in April at 85, is most famously recognized as the longtime president of the Motion Picture Assn. of America. During his tenure, Valenti created and defended the often-controversial rating systems for films.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2007 | Richard Schickel, Special to The Times
I was always glad to see Jack Valenti's dapper, diminutive form across a crowded room. We all need a little bit of egregious flattery in our gray little lives, and Jack was the master massager of the bruised or battered ego. We were acquaintances, not friends, but that never stopped him from saying something nice about something I'd written. He was a guy who kept up -- an omnivorous reader, a smart politician and, above all, an enthusiast for whatever cause had enlisted his loyalties.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The audio version of the forthcoming memoir by the late Jack Valenti will be read by Michael Douglas -- including a passage about ... Michael Douglas. Valenti was supposed to narrate "This Time, This Place" himself, but he died before production started, so the Academy Award-winning actor stepped in. The project, from Harmony Books, is due for release June 12. Valenti was close friends with Douglas' father, Kirk Douglas, and wrote warmly of the entire Douglas family.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2007 | Sherry Lansing and William Friedkin, Special to The Times
We were both privileged to work with Jack Valenti and to know him well. To say his death marks the passing of an era is only part of the story. He leaves a big footprint. There was no better friend, and if you were his friend, there was nothing he wouldn't do for you. He used to greet us with hugs and kisses and he was more concerned about our lives than citing his own accomplishments. "What can I do to help?" is the phrase by which we most remember him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2007 | James Bates, Times Staff Writer
Jack Valenti, the urbane Washington lobbyist who served as Hollywood's public face for nearly four decades and was best known for creating the film ratings system, died Thursday afternoon, according to Warren Cowan, his longtime friend. He was 85. Valenti had been in ill health since suffering a stroke in March. He was treated for several weeks at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore but was released Tuesday and returned to his home in Washington, where he died.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2007 | James Bates, Times Staff Writer
Jack Valenti, Hollywood's top official in Washington for 38 years, is making progress at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore after suffering a stroke last week. Texas native Valenti, 85, joined the Motion Picture Assn. of America in 1966 after serving as a senior aide to President Lyndon B. Johnson. Valenti served as head of the MPAA until his retirement in 2004, when he was succeeded by Dan Glickman.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
Jack Valenti is busily scripting the end of his legendary life. But, even after 85 years, it's very much a work in progress. Valenti, who ended his 38-year run as Hollywood's leading man in the nation's capital more than two years ago, continues to work five days a week as something of an icon-on-call.
MAGAZINE
October 20, 1996 | NINA J. EASTON, Nina J. Easton is the magazine's staff writer. Her last story was about a then-single John F. Kennedy Jr. and George magazine
The bookends of Jack Valenti's public life sit as paired photos atop his office bureau in downtown Washington. In one he is a peripheral figure at a momentous event--a 42-year-old Houston ad man who, just hours earlier, was part of the ill-fated presidential motorcade through Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, his position there a perk of his duties for the Kennedy-Johnson campaign.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
Jack Valenti is busily scripting the end of his legendary life. But, even after 85 years, it's very much a work in progress. Valenti, who ended his 38-year run as Hollywood's leading man in the nation's capital more than two years ago, continues to work five days a week as something of an icon-on-call.
BUSINESS
December 9, 2005 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
Fifteen months after riding off into the sunset, Jack Valenti has made a temporary U-turn. Hollywood's former top lobbyist, who walked the halls of Congress for 38 years before retiring as head of the Motion Picture Assn. of America in 2004, is back working lawmakers in an effort to head off potential television and cable indecency sanctions. Last week, Valenti, 84, resurfaced on Capitol Hill during a forum organized by Sen.
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