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October 11, 1996 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Under a cross-fire from environmentalists, timber interests and U.S. Forest Service employees, the chief steward of federal forest lands Thursday announced that he is quitting. Jack Ward Thomas, the first wildlife biologist to head the Forest Service, said that he would end a tenure that had become symbolic to some of the increasing intractability of conflicts over wild lands at a time of unflagging population pressure.
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NEWS
October 11, 1996 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Under a cross-fire from environmentalists, timber interests and U.S. Forest Service employees, the chief steward of federal forest lands Thursday announced that he is quitting. Jack Ward Thomas, the first wildlife biologist to head the Forest Service, said that he would end a tenure that had become symbolic to some of the increasing intractability of conflicts over wild lands at a time of unflagging population pressure.
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NEWS
December 3, 1996 | Associated Press
Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman named an associate chief of the Forest Service as its acting chief Monday and said he intends to pick a permanent successor to Jack Ward Thomas by the end of the month. Associate Chief Dave Unger, 64, assumed the temporary post on Monday, Thomas' last day after three years as chief. Unger joined the Forest Service in 1987 as director of watershed and air management. Thomas said he will teach at the University of Montana.
NEWS
February 20, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A tradition-rich national forest conference reconvenes today, seeking a truce between timber companies and environmentalists at a time when tension over U.S. logging policy is at a historic high. "The time has come for the nation to turn away from polarization and toward consensus," Forest Service Chief Jack Ward Thomas said in a welcome prepared for the Seventh American Forest Congress.
NEWS
August 25, 1994
In the shadow of the Angeles National Forest, the new chief of the U.S. Forest Service said last week that a forest entry fee is one possible way to avoid shutting down more campground and picnic areas. "We can look at the potential for cooperative user fees with states and counties," said Chief Jack Ward Thomas at a Pasadena press conference. "We could possibly seek permission for pilot efforts for the collection of user fees, if Congress should see that as appropriate."
NEWS
April 30, 1991 | From Associated Press
The government's proposal to protect the northern spotted owl would cost the Pacific Northwest about 40,000 jobs in timbering and related industries by 1995, Fish and Wildlife Service economists said Monday. The estimated loss would be 57% more than earlier projections. Logging on the Northwest's federal lands would fall to less than one-fifth of historic levels, and the region's timber-related employment would drop to 13,259 jobs, according to the analysis.
NATIONAL
March 17, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The Bush administration formalized its plan to sell more than 300,000 acres of national forest to help pay for rural schools in 41 states, submitting legislation to Congress on Thursday to funnel $800 million to the schools over the next five years. The schools would get $320 million next year, but the figure would drop sharply after that, to $40 million in its final year, officials said. That would be a 90% decrease from current spending -- a figure Western lawmakers called unacceptable.
NEWS
October 29, 1993 | TOM KENWORTHY, THE WASHINGTON POST
The Clinton Administration on Thursday removed the two top officials of the U.S. Forest Service, one of the government's most troubled and frequently criticized agencies. F. Dale Robertson, a career forester who served as chief of the Forest Service for six years, was transferred to a special assistant's job in the Agriculture Department, the service's parent agency. His associate chief, George M. Leonard, was moved to a new position under Assistant Agriculture Secretary James Lyons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1996
Burning nearly 6 million acres, mostly in the West, the brush and forest fires of 1996 have been the most extensive in three decades. The year's conflagrations are the third most expensive ever, costing taxpayers more than $640 million to fight them. Increasingly in recent years, flames have taken a heavy toll on California. While the state lost 3,500 structures to wildfires between 1920 and 1989, for example, 4,500 structures were destroyed in 1990-93 alone.
NEWS
August 11, 1996 | MAGGIE McNEIL, REUTERS
Controlled fires need to be lit periodically in endangered national forests in the Southwest to stop the escalation of forest fires, U.S. Forest Service Chief Jack Ward Thomas says. "We must restore fire to fire-adapted ecosystems on a large scale," Thomas told a congressional hearing on this year's devastating forest fires in Arizona and New Mexico.
NEWS
May 29, 1992 | From Associated Press
The U.S. Forest Service must rework its plan for protecting the threatened northern spotted owl, a federal judge ruled Thursday, saying the agency's environmental impact statement omits new scientific evidence that indicates the threatened birds are declining faster than previously thought. U.S. District Judge William Dwyer did not rule on whether to continue a ban on nearly all logging in Northwest national forests while the additional work is done.
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