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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1989 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
American Judaism, undergoing "far-reaching" change over the last two decades, has more options than ever for spiritual expression--yet most Jews are reducing their religious involvement to a minimum or drifting away entirely from the faith. That paradox has not gone unobserved in recent times, but few have outlined the religious trends among U.S. Jews as comprehensively as historian Jack Wertheimer has done in the just-published 1989 American Jewish Year Book.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1989 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
American Judaism, undergoing "far-reaching" change over the last two decades, has more options than ever for spiritual expression--yet most Jews are reducing their religious involvement to a minimum or drifting away entirely from the faith. That paradox has not gone unobserved in recent times, but few have outlined the religious trends among U.S. Jews as comprehensively as historian Jack Wertheimer has done in the just-published 1989 American Jewish Year Book.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1996 | From Religion News Service
A new survey of Conservative Jews shows that more than two-thirds reject traditional Judaism's insistence that only the children of Jewish mothers can be called Jewish at birth, regardless of the father's religious identity. Yet the same survey also showed that 62% believe that Conservative Jews are "obligated to obey" traditional Jewish law. Those findings underscore the degree of internal contradiction with which Judaism's 1.8 million-member centrist denomination is wrestling.
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November 27, 1999 | From Associated Press
In the decades after World War II, the United Jewish Appeal had it easy. American Jews horrified by the Holocaust and fervent in their support for Israel poured hundreds of millions of dollars a year into the coffers of the UJA, by far the largest Jewish fund-raising group in the nation. But today, in an age obsessed with quick results and individual control, donors are far less eager to open their checkbooks for large, impersonal annual campaigns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2000 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Why is this Seder different from all other Seders? At a Passover ritual feast near Griffith Park this week, the unleavened bread was laid out just as it has been for more than 3,000 years. The traditional songs were sung, the four questions asked about why Passover is different from all other nights as a gathering of 300 people celebrated the timeless story of the Jewish people's exodus from Egypt and liberation from slavery.
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February 18, 2001 | DAVID LAUTER, David Lauter is a senior editor on The Times' Metro desk
No doubt Henry Luce would have been pained to contemplate it, but the era that the founder of Time was pleased to dub the "American century" became the Jewish century in American history. Before the 20th century, the Jewish presence in America, although of long standing, was relatively small. It was 1654 when the first Jewish settlers arrived in North America. The 1820s brought the first large-scale migrations from Prussia, Bohemia and elsewhere in Central Europe.
NEWS
April 21, 1998 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anne Bayme had the best of all models of what it is to be a Jewish woman: her mother, Sylvia Brown. Not only did Brown keep a kosher home and her family observant of Jewish tradition, but she was part of holding together the 10 Jewish families of tiny Vidalia, Ga., going out into the vastly Christian world around them and bringing Judaism to life. In her own time, Bayme would do a version of this in her hometown of Macon, Ga., but in ways her mother never could have dreamed.
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