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Jack Wilke

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July 5, 1990 | LEON WHITESON, Whiteson is a Los Angeles architect and author whose latest book is "The Watts Towers of Los Angeles."
When Kentucky Fried Chicken franchisee Jack Wilke was looking for ways to update his 25-year-old Western Avenue restaurant, he decided on a radical move. "I challenged the notion that all KFC franchises should have the same standard design of fake mansard roofs (and) outsize Colonel Sanders bucket," Wilke said. "Why not do something radically different for a change?" Wilke, a noted local art collector, turned to architect Elyse Grinstein for help.
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NEWS
July 5, 1990 | LEON WHITESON, Whiteson is a Los Angeles architect and author whose latest book is "The Watts Towers of Los Angeles."
When Kentucky Fried Chicken franchisee Jack Wilke was looking for ways to update his 25-year-old Western Avenue restaurant, he decided on a radical move. "I challenged the notion that all KFC franchises should have the same standard design of fake mansard roofs (and) outsize Colonel Sanders bucket," Wilke said. "Why not do something radically different for a change?" Wilke, a noted local art collector, turned to architect Elyse Grinstein for help.
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NEWS
April 26, 1996 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President John F. Kennedy's golf clubs, split into two lots of woods and irons, sold Thursday for a combined $1,160,000 during Day 3 of the phenomenon known as the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis estate auction. Amid gasps and applause, four MacGregor woods and a Wilson 2 wood were hammered down for $772,500, while a set of Ben Hogan irons sold for $387,500. Both sets of clubs, which had estimated values of $900 each, were contained in golf bags with the logo "JFK, Washington, D.C."
MAGAZINE
August 5, 1990 | MICHAEL WEBB, Michael Webb writes about architecture and design. His latest book, "The City Square," will be published in October
HEADING NORTH FROM the Santa Monica Freeway, Los Angeles' Western Avenue is a blur of storefronts, offices and mini-malls. Only the green corner tower of the Wiltern Center and a few lesser examples of Art Deco architecture catch the eye. Suddenly, at 1st Street, Col. Sanders appears, smiling like the Cheshire cat from what seems to be a lantern floating above the street.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1985 | DORIS A. FULLER, Times Staff Writer
From where Gary Thomson sits, the America's Cup isn't just a race for 12-meter yachts. It's a business. Thomson, 43, is president of the Newport Harbor Yacht Club's Eagle Challenge, one of the half a dozen U.S. syndicates that hope to recapture the America's Cup from Australia, which took the trophy home to the Royal Perth Yacht Club after an upset win two years ago.
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