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NEWS
January 20, 1994 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When he was a boy, Jack Woody stumbled across a treasure trove of old photographs and movie stills that had been passed down from his grandmother, 1930s film star Helen Twelvetrees. Leafing through the sumptuously bound albums, the precocious youngster was consumed with curiosity about the glamorous actress who had taken an overdose when he was only a toddler. He found snapshots of her on an ocean liner with Ruth Etting and camping in the Sierras with Veronica Lake.
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NEWS
January 20, 1994 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When he was a boy, Jack Woody stumbled across a treasure trove of old photographs and movie stills that had been passed down from his grandmother, 1930s film star Helen Twelvetrees. Leafing through the sumptuously bound albums, the precocious youngster was consumed with curiosity about the glamorous actress who had taken an overdose when he was only a toddler. He found snapshots of her on an ocean liner with Ruth Etting and camping in the Sierras with Veronica Lake.
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NEWS
August 1, 1991 | MARY HELEN BERG, Mary Helen Berg is a free-lance writer who regularly contributes to The Times Orange County Edition.
John Wayne Airport, unlike its namesake, doesn't usually evoke images of movie-star glamour. But through Aug. 23 travelers can find a trace of cinematic allure there in "Lost Hollywood," an exhibit of 75 black and white photographs from Hollywood's golden years, 1916 to 1933, presented by the airport's arts commission. The vintage photos in the touring exhibition were collected and published in a book of the same title by Jack Woody, owner of Twelvetrees Press.
NEWS
November 24, 1988 | DAVID COLKER, Times Staff Writer
Herb Ritts, the superstar celebrity photographer, can offer a graphic lesson in how censorship in Japan affects the art world to anyone who takes a few steps into the gallery showing his first solo exhibition. Taking up much of a wall, just opposite the front door of the Fahey-Klein Gallery in Hollywood, is "Male Nude With Bubble," a mural-sized photograph of a naked model standing behind a large floating soap bubble.
NEWS
December 8, 1988 | BETH ANN KRIER
California boasts dozens of staunchly independent publishers. Among them are a handful of presses particularly notable for such qualities as unique focus, well-known writers, devotion to artistic detail or especially rapid rise to prominence. CAPRA PRESS Santa Barbara-based Capra Press was founded in 1969 by Noel Young, a designer and printer of books, who began publishing shorter works of famous authors, including Henry Miller, Anais Nin, Lawrence Durrell and Colin Wilson.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1986 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
"William Brice: A Selection of Painting and Drawing, 1947-1986" and "Tokyo: Form and Spirit" open Sept. 1 at the Museum of Contemporary Art's Temporary Contemporary facility. Organized by MOCA and sponsored by the Fellows of Contemporary Art, "William Brice" is the first major retrospective of the artist's work. The 49 paintings and 25 works on paper survey the evolution of themes and ideas that define Brice's oeuvre since 1947.
NEWS
April 24, 1991 | LORETTA SCHERTZ KELLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Thousands flock to Old Pasadena on weekend evenings to sample the movies, restaurant fare and vibrant street life of the quarter some consider a kind of Westwood East. But only a few call the district home. Before Old Pasadena's redevelopment started in the late 1970s, the neighborhood was noted for its artists who had set up easels and cots in second-story lofts and apartments. But rising rents and commercialization forced the artists out. Today, residents of the area are a motley group.
NEWS
April 5, 1987 | KEVIN McGILL, Associated Press
It's just a boxy metal frame with slats inside and a trap door on top. But it has shrimpers all along the Gulf Coast up in arms, fearful that it will decimate their harvests and drive them out of business. It's called a TED, short for Turtle Exclusion Device or Trawling Efficiency Device, depending on whom you talk to. It's also called "an Edsel" by Tee John Mialjevich, a burly Cajun who is president of Concerned Shrimpers of Louisiana. "We lost the oil industry," he said.
NEWS
February 6, 2000 | MIKE DOWNEY
The photograph was taken May 25, 1911, over a river in Okemah, Okla., from a newly built steel bridge. Laura Nelson is wearing a calico dress. She is a woman of about 35, shoeless, a wedding band visible on her finger. A second photo depicts her son, L.W., age 14. The two of them are shown together, suspended above the water by ropes. Being lynched. The photograph was taken July 24, 1892, near a woodshed in Redding, Calif., a railroad trestle to the rear.
NEWS
January 29, 1992 | RANDYE HODER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The small, 1930s-era turquoise building, with red hibiscus and orange poppies adorning its entrance, seems out of place along this otherwise bleak city block in Altadena. But, then again, it would be even more out of place amid the skyscrapers of Manhattan, a city where one is more likely to find the kind of business that is done by this bustling San Gabriel Valley enterprise.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1990 | BARBARA ISENBERG
There they were, actor Richard Gere and Lucite furniture sales rep Herb Ritts, out in the desert waiting at a gas station for a flat tire to be fixed. Ritts, who had just started taking photographs of his friends, picked up his camera and shot three rolls of film. Gere took the film to his publicist, the publicist got it to Mademoiselle, Esquire and American Vogue, and Ritts started getting checks in the mail.
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