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Jack Youngblood

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SPORTS
September 7, 1985
Jack Youngblood has clearly earned his place among the greatest Rams of all time. His 100% hustle on the field will be missed, but certainly not forgotten. A job well done, Jack. JEFFREY K. BOWEN Arcadia
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SPORTS
October 9, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Our interview with Jack Youngblood is the latest in a series of Q&As with prominent sports figures. Jack Youngblood is 61 and still Ram tough. The Los Angeles Rams defensive lineman from the 1970s and early '80s has just released a biography, "Because It Was Sunday," a reference to Youngblood's willingness to endure whatever pain necessary to play in the NFL. The Hall of Famer famously broke a leg in the second quarter of a playoff upset of the Dallas Cowboys. Youngblood completed that game, helped the Rams shut out the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 9-0, to put the Rams in their first Super Bowl in 1980, then suited up in a near-upset of the Pittsburgh Steelers in the Super Bowl.
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SPORTS
August 3, 2001 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two guys named Jack, traveling the same route, are headed for a small town in Ohio named Canton. If they begin in Los Angeles and pass through Anaheim before turning east, how long will it take them to reach the doorstep of the Pro Football Hall of Fame? Answer: One will take 11 years longer than the other. This question will never wind up on the NFL's Wonderlich intelligence test, because no one, not even the Rhodes scholar Ivy League quarterback, would be able to figure it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2010 | By Keith Thursby
Merlin Olsen, a Hall of Fame defensive lineman with the Los Angeles Rams who was a charter member of the team's famed Fearsome Foursome, then made a remarkably smooth transition into careers in broadcasting and acting, has died. He was 69. Olsen died early Thursday at City of Hope hospital in Duarte while surrounded by his family, his brother Orrin said. He had been diagnosed last year with mesothelioma, a form of cancer that affects the lining of the lungs. Olsen played 15 seasons in the NFL from 1962 to 1976, all with the Rams.
SPORTS
January 27, 2000 | TIM BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Youngblood lives near Orlando, Fla., in a town called Winter Park, where he is a consultant for the Arena Football League and fishes and hunts and raises his son, Robert. Robert is 16 and dabbles in football. What Robert plays, though, is soccer. Now when the son of Jack Youngblood can grow up in Florida a soccer player, then you know football has made a terrible, terrible mistake. "He's growing," said Youngblood, the former Ram defensive end, pleased.
SPORTS
January 4, 1986
The Ram organization should be ashamed beyond belief for Jack Youngblood's halftime ceremony Monday night (Dec. 23). It appeared to me to be a quickly thrown-together affair with no thought or respect whatsoever. Even his ex-teammates returned to the field during his thank-you speech. To one of the classiest Rams of all time, no class was shown. C. RICKSON Anaheim
SPORTS
August 11, 1985 | RICH ROBERTS
The Rams honored 24 players from their 40 years in Southern California with a pregame reception and halftime ceremony at Anaheim Stadium Saturday night. Owner Georgia Frontiere presented each player with an engraved brass plate. The turnout included all but five of the living members of the 40-year team selected by readers of The Times--Merlin Olsen, Jon Arnett, Les Richter, Eddie Meador and Eric Dickerson.
SPORTS
March 13, 1987
Jack Youngblood, retired Rams defensive end, will receive the CHOC Padrinos "Sportsman of the Year" award at the annual Membership Mixer dinner Tuesday night at the Irvine Marriott. Proceeds will benefit the Childrens Hospital of Orange County. The award is presented annually to an accomplished athlete for his commitment to CHOC and the community. Previous recipients were Angel pitcher Mike Witt in 1986 and Olympic diver Greg Louganis in 1985.
SPORTS
August 3, 2001 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two guys named Jack, traveling the same route, are headed for a small town in Ohio named Canton. If they begin in Los Angeles and pass through Anaheim before turning east, how long will it take them to reach the doorstep of the Pro Football Hall of Fame? Answer: One will take 11 years longer than the other. This question will never wind up on the NFL's Wonderlich intelligence test, because no one, not even the Rhodes scholar Ivy League quarterback, would be able to figure it.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | BOB OATES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was another big day for the Rams. The old Los Angeles Rams. Their first in many years. Two of their finest players, defensive end Jack Youngblood and offensive tackle Jackie Slater, were voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame on Saturday as members of the seven-man class of 2001. They joined guard Tom Mack and running back Eric Dickerson to make it four Rams in two years. It was also a great day for USC.
SPORTS
January 16, 2001 | CHRIS DUFRESNE
If Jack Youngblood is not a hall of famer, why did Chuck Knox once say, "He'll go down as one of the top defensive ends in the history of football"? How come former Ram equipment man Don Hewitt vowed never again to issue jersey No. 85? Why did men cry at Youngblood's retirement news conference on Aug. 27, 1985?
SPORTS
January 27, 2000 | TIM BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Youngblood lives near Orlando, Fla., in a town called Winter Park, where he is a consultant for the Arena Football League and fishes and hunts and raises his son, Robert. Robert is 16 and dabbles in football. What Robert plays, though, is soccer. Now when the son of Jack Youngblood can grow up in Florida a soccer player, then you know football has made a terrible, terrible mistake. "He's growing," said Youngblood, the former Ram defensive end, pleased.
SPORTS
December 8, 1992 | BOB OATES
At long last, someone has recognized Jack Youngblood. Someone knows. Someone remembers that Youngblood, who will be inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame tonight, was probably the greatest defensive end of his time. Beginning in the early 1970s, Youngblood played 14 years for the Rams. He never missed a game. He played three games--the 1980 Super Bowl among them--with a broken leg. He played in seven Pro Bowls.
SPORTS
February 27, 1992 | TIM KAWAKAMI
Jack Youngblood says if he has one model for learning how to lead men, one man whose energy and vision he hopes to incorporate into his job as an executive for the Sacramento Surge in the World League of American Football, it is Chuck Knox. Youngblood was a third-year backup defensive lineman when Knox first came to the Rams as head coach in 1973. One of Knox's first moves was to make Youngblood a starter. The team went from 6-7-1 under Tommy Prothro in 1972 to 12-2 in 1973.
SPORTS
February 27, 1992 | TIM KAWAKAMI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a quick, quixotic roll of the dice a year ago, Jack Youngblood left home, his job and the hometown glory of his playing days to wander a new career path sharply removed from all the comforts of his life as a Ram emeritus. He walked away from a secure, if hardly challenging, administrative job with the Rams that was as much a payback for his 14 years as a fire-breathing defensive end as anything else. He left it all in the dust for a league that could have folded on the spot.
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