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Jackie Collins

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2014 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Author Jackie Collins still has the steam engine chugging. Her newest novel, "Lucky: Confessions of a Wild Child," released last week, is a prequel to the Lucky Santangelo books and centers on the treasured heroine during her formative teen years - the book has already landed a film deal with Amber Entertainment. The 76-year-old scribe talks about finally getting into character and staying clued-up. For the record: In the Sunday Conversation feature in the Calendar section, the title of author Jackie Collins' latest novel was given as "Lucky: Confessions of a Wild Child.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2014 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Author Jackie Collins still has the steam engine chugging. Her newest novel, "Lucky: Confessions of a Wild Child," released last week, is a prequel to the Lucky Santangelo books and centers on the treasured heroine during her formative teen years - the book has already landed a film deal with Amber Entertainment. The 76-year-old scribe talks about finally getting into character and staying clued-up. For the record: In the Sunday Conversation feature in the Calendar section, the title of author Jackie Collins' latest novel was given as "Lucky: Confessions of a Wild Child.
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NEWS
April 1, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And now this from India's "Queen of Porn," the first woman author here to use "the F-word," as she calls it, in print: "The way my day and my life is structured, it's all with kids!" "With kids and kids and kids," says Shobha De. "And, you know, their days, their tennis, their pianos, their birthdays, their school schedules, their clothes. . . ." Is this "the Jackie Collins of India," as her critics and even her publisher have dubbed her?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2011
Evening news' big break Viewership is up at "CBS Evening News" since Scott Pelley took over as anchor in early June. Then again, the same can be said for his rivals. Pelley's third-place newscast reached an average of 5.55 million viewers during his first five weeks in the anchor chair, an increase of 7% over the same five weeks in 2010 when Katie Couric was the anchor, the Nielsen Co. said. During the same time, Brian Williams' "Nightly News" on NBC averaged 7.88 million people each night, and ABC's "World News" with Diane Sawyer had 7.12 million, Nielsen said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2011
Evening news' big break Viewership is up at "CBS Evening News" since Scott Pelley took over as anchor in early June. Then again, the same can be said for his rivals. Pelley's third-place newscast reached an average of 5.55 million viewers during his first five weeks in the anchor chair, an increase of 7% over the same five weeks in 2010 when Katie Couric was the anchor, the Nielsen Co. said. During the same time, Brian Williams' "Nightly News" on NBC averaged 7.88 million people each night, and ABC's "World News" with Diane Sawyer had 7.12 million, Nielsen said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2010 | By Mark Sachs
Jackie Collins has sold more than 400 million books in her career, and her 27th, "Poor Little Bitch Girl," just came out this month. "It's about three girls who went to Beverly Hills High together, and a guy, Bobby, who is the son of my most popular character, Lucky Santangelo," Collins said. "There's a murder, a mysterious disappearance, a cheating senator in Washington and a woman who runs a call-girl service in New York. It's very timely with all these cheating politicians coming out of the woodwork now."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1985 | PAUL ROSENFIELD
The only way to live happily in Hollywood is not to need anything from anyone. --Novelist Jackie Collins All Hollywood, unlike all Gaul, can be divided into two parts: the Players and the Observers. The Players have the power, primarily to say yes or no, and to sign checks--while the Observers (if they're very lucky) have all the fun. At the top of the heap of observers is someone called the Hollywood Novelist. It's a misleading label.
NEWS
March 18, 1988 | ANN CONWAY
Jackie Collins, steamy novelist and Vanity Fair cover girl (with sister Joan Collins this month), will limo from Beverly Hills to appear at Sen. William Campbell's Conference on Women. Has the author of "Hollywood Wives" ever set foot in Orange County? "No," came her honey voice over the telephone. "I don't think so. But I picture a lot of orange trees. I hope I won't be disappointed." Collins will probably be disappointed.
NEWS
August 24, 1988 | United Press International
Senior leader Deng Xiaoping, angered at a proliferation of steamy Western novels in China, has suggested that some publishers may face execution if they don't stop publishing "pornographic" material, Chinese editors and publishers said Tuesday. Deng's suggestion that publishers of spicy material may face the ultimate punishment has sparked a crackdown on allegedly obscene publications.
BOOKS
December 28, 1986 | Tom Nolan
"Was that what attracted him to Clarissa? Her aloofness? . . . Or did he just like being with her because she was an Oscar-winning actress and not some Hollywood bimbette?" Such are the questions pondered by the rogue males in this raunchy prowl through the corridors of Hollywood power.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2010 | By Mark Sachs
Jackie Collins has sold more than 400 million books in her career, and her 27th, "Poor Little Bitch Girl," just came out this month. "It's about three girls who went to Beverly Hills High together, and a guy, Bobby, who is the son of my most popular character, Lucky Santangelo," Collins said. "There's a murder, a mysterious disappearance, a cheating senator in Washington and a woman who runs a call-girl service in New York. It's very timely with all these cheating politicians coming out of the woodwork now."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2008 | William Georgiades, Special to The Times
"It's NICE here, isn't it?" Jackie Collins said in her clear, measured, L.A.-by-way-of-London tone. Jack Black and Dr. Phil were sitting nearby on the terrace of the Polo Lounge at the Beverly Hills Hotel, but it was Collins' arrival that created the stir. A large diamond sparkled on her left hand, enlivening her appearance in a simple, tailored black suit, offset with dramatic hoop earrings. "I like to sit here where you can see everyone."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2008 | Choire Sicha, Special to The Times
Jules ASNER wrote "Whacked," a new novel set in Hollywood about a lover spurned who plots creative revenge. She was the co-host of "E! News Daily" and host of "Revealed With Jules Asner." She is married to Steven Soderbergh. You're on your third career -- model, T.V. anchor, author. I was never really a model. That somehow is in my bio. The whole thing is I was tall since I was a child -- you're either a model or you play basketball. When did you start writing?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2004 | Roy Rivenburg, Times Staff Writer
Clutching a diamond-encrusted pen worth $150,000, author Jackie Collins smiles for the cameras and then scribbles the latest plot twist in a book that is destined -- if all goes well -- to never be published. It's a literary experiment called the "Great American Love Story," a traveling romance novel that the public is invited to help write. Sponsored by Montblanc, maker of outrageously priced pens, the book got underway in New York in March.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2004 | Victoria Looseleaf
With dozens of leather-bound books lining the shelves, a sleek Art Deco desk attracting the eye, and Camel-emblazoned ashtrays resting on an imposing marble table, this could be the law office of a fashionable attorney. Upon closer examination, however, these tomes are not torts, criminal canons, or forensic files but original manuscripts written in longhand with colored felt-tip pens. Their titles?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2003 | Miles Beller, Special to The Times
Real kitsch might not be a thing of beauty, but it surely can be a thing of comedy. Enter the CBS film "Jackie Collins' Hollywood Wives: The New Generation." Starring Farrah Fawcett, Melissa Gilbert and Robin Givens, "Wives" is a marriage made in camp heaven. Here love means never having to say I'm serious -- at least not in credible dramatic terms.
NEWS
July 20, 1990 | NIKKI FINKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Apparently, it's not easy writing a trash novel about Hollywood. Because it takes not one but two writers to do it these days. Now, this may come as a shock to Jackie Collins, the undisputed schlock jock of the sun-and-sex-on-Sunset genre, who has been turning out mega-bestsellers by herself for two decades. But, this summer, a new trend has sprung up: Hollywood trash teams. The idea seems to be that two brains are better than one when it comes to thinking up story lines.
NEWS
August 23, 1987 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
A small earthquake registering moderately severe on the Beverly Hills panic scale is rumbling from Malibu to Hollywood. Jackie Collins is finishing her 12th novel in 20 years this month, and her friends already are feeling the aftershocks. On this particular night, the epicenter is located at Spago. Standing in the garden terrace, a drink in one hand, a slice of pizza in the other, producer David Niven Jr. whispers conspiratorially.
BOOKS
August 12, 2001 | R. HUNTER GARCIA, R. Hunter Garcia is book review editor of Entertainment Today and has contributed reviews to USA Today, The New York Post, The Hollywood Reporter and Publishers Weekly
You don't have to read a word of Jackie Collins' oeuvre to know what she's talking about. There's a special kind of aura to the books. Their glossy cover designs and shameless titles vibrate with the promise of good, cheap, nostalgic fun--like the sight of a redwood hot tub and a sweating bottle of chardonnay lying nearby.
NEWS
March 15, 1998 | IRENE LACHER
You've heard of four-car garages? How about a four-oven kitchen? In the land of one-is-not-enough, Jackie Collins is cooking with, as the expression goes, gas. Oh, yes. She also has three marble-topped islands. And why would anyone need a personal bushel of appliances and surfaces? For Christmas lunch, of course, when the renaissance author cooks for 40 revelers.
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