Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJackie Gleason
IN THE NEWS

Jackie Gleason

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 25, 1987 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Jackie Gleason, the barrel-shaped "Great One" who won television fame and riches as a blustering bus driver in "The Honeymooners," and an Oscar nomination for his film portrayal of an aging pool shark in "The Hustler," died Wednesday at his home outside Fort Lauderdale, Fla. He was 71, and his wife, Marilyn, said cancer was the immediate cause of death. Gleason had been released only last week from Imperial Point Medical Center in Fort Lauderdale, where he had been undergoing treatment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2014
Sheila MacRae Actress-singer was on '60s 'Honeymooners' Sheila MacRae, 92, a versatile actress and singer who performed in a popular 1950s nightclub act with her husband, Gordon MacRae, and appeared opposite Jackie Gleason in his late '60s revival of "The Honeymooners," died Thursday night at the Lillian Booth Actors Home of the Actors Fund in Englewood, N.J. She had undergone surgery a few weeks ago and had apparently been recovering well...
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
The closed casket of Jackie Gleason will be on view to the public today at Lithgow Funeral Home in North Miami, a family spokesman said Thursday. A funeral Mass, closed except to family members, will be said Saturday, he said, and the time and place will not be made public. Burial arrangements were still not complete for the actor-comic, who died of cancer of the colon and liver Wednesday night in his home near Fort Lauderdale. He was 71.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Can we finally get beyond the Great American Novel ? It's the fantasy of an earlier America, like Manifest Destiny. And yet, to read Harvard professor Lawrence Buell's “American Literature's Holy Grail : Franzen, DFW and the Hunt for the Great American Novel” in Salon over the weekend was to experience a cognitive dissonance, as if the shaggy monster he portrays were somehow real. Buell's essay is excerpted from his book “The Dream of the Great American Novel” (Harvard University Press: 584 pp., $39.95)
NEWS
October 13, 2002 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
When Brad Garrett was a young stand-up comedian working clubs around the country, he could come home around 1 or 2 in the morning, sit in front of the television set with a bag of Chee-tos and watch repeats of the classic 1955-56 Jackie Gleason comedy series, "The Honeymooners." Garrett immediately felt a kinship with the Gleason who played the blustery but lovable bus driver Ralph Kramden in the seminal sitcom.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
It was Orson Welles who gave Jackie Gleason the moniker "The Great One" when the filmmaker and the comic genius were out on the town one night. Gleason, who died in 1987 at age 71, was also known as "Mr. Saturday Night" because he dominated Saturday night programming on CBS from 1951 until 1970. Just as with Lucille Ball in "I Love Lucy," the former nightclub performer became a superstar on TV in the medium's earliest days, creating such beloved characters as the poignant Poor Soul, the exuberant Reggie Van Gleason III and the chatty Joe the Bartender.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Can we finally get beyond the Great American Novel ? It's the fantasy of an earlier America, like Manifest Destiny. And yet, to read Harvard professor Lawrence Buell's “American Literature's Holy Grail : Franzen, DFW and the Hunt for the Great American Novel” in Salon over the weekend was to experience a cognitive dissonance, as if the shaggy monster he portrays were somehow real. Buell's essay is excerpted from his book “The Dream of the Great American Novel” (Harvard University Press: 584 pp., $39.95)
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may be hard to fathom, but The Honeymooners, one of the most beloved shows from TV's Golden Age, was not a success when it aired on CBS from October, 1955 to September, 1956. The top-rated show that season was "The $64,000 Question."
NEWS
June 28, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Jackie Gleason was mourned Saturday at a private funeral service by about 150 people, including his family and actress Audrey Meadows, who played his wife, Alice, in "The Honeymooners." "We've lost a pal. Like everybody said, he was the world's greatest," said Philip Cuoco, a "Honeymooners" associate producer. Meadows, who played Alice Kramden to Gleason's Ralph Kramden on television, was dressed in black and held a single red carnation--a Gleason trademark.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
RALPH, the Royal Assn. for the Longevity and Preservation of the Honeymooners, a fan club that helped uncover lost episodes of "The Honeymooners" and brought the classic sitcom back on the air, has folded because of the death of Jackie Gleason. Founders Peter Crescenti and Bob Columbe of Old Brookville, N.Y., recently sent out a final newsletter to members--who include Bruce Springsteen and Cyndi Lauper--memorializing Gleason, who starred as bus driver Ralph Kramden.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
Filmmaker William Friedkin, who's best known for such landmark films as "The French Connection" and "The Exorcist" in the early '70s, looks back on a long career directing movies, opera and theater in his new memoir, "The Friedkin Connection. " Why do you think Sonny Bono, whom you directed in the 1967 film "Good Times," was a genius, as you write ? Sonny Bono was a guy who created a number of No. 1 hit songs in the '60s. At first they might have sounded to a lot of older people like popcorn songs, bubble gum, but those songs, many of them, are really strong and they stand the test of time.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2011 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Initially known for such obsessive noirs as "Laura" and "Fallen Angel," Otto Preminger enjoyed a long run in the 1950s and '60s as one of Hollywood's most ambitious practitioners of the issue movie. Driven to dramatize big social-political themes and the largest institutions of public life, he tackled drug addiction ("The Man With the Golden Arm"), the legal system ("Anatomy of a Murder"), the state of Israel ("Exodus"), Beltway duplicity ("Advise & Consent"), the Catholic Church ("The Cardinal")
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
It was Orson Welles who gave Jackie Gleason the moniker "The Great One" when the filmmaker and the comic genius were out on the town one night. Gleason, who died in 1987 at age 71, was also known as "Mr. Saturday Night" because he dominated Saturday night programming on CBS from 1951 until 1970. Just as with Lucille Ball in "I Love Lucy," the former nightclub performer became a superstar on TV in the medium's earliest days, creating such beloved characters as the poignant Poor Soul, the exuberant Reggie Van Gleason III and the chatty Joe the Bartender.
NEWS
October 13, 2002 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
When Brad Garrett was a young stand-up comedian working clubs around the country, he could come home around 1 or 2 in the morning, sit in front of the television set with a bag of Chee-tos and watch repeats of the classic 1955-56 Jackie Gleason comedy series, "The Honeymooners." Garrett immediately felt a kinship with the Gleason who played the blustery but lovable bus driver Ralph Kramden in the seminal sitcom.
NEWS
May 30, 2001 | ANA BEATRIZ CHOLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With only three days left until she tied the knot, Jane Edith Wilson was going to have one last wild night as a single woman. The Conga Room? A male strip show? Nope. Wilson, a 36-year-old Los Angeles actress-comedian spent her waning minutes as an unattached woman gripping a large neon ball and bowling with seven friends. On a recent night at Jillian's Hi-Life Lanes in Universal City--a cross between a retro bowling alley and ritzy bar--the bachelorette party was well underway.
NEWS
August 29, 2000 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It could have been an argument right out of Ralph and Alice Kramden's kitchen on "The Honeymooners." Swelling with indignation, the bus driver shouts: "One of these days, Alice! One of these days they're gonna build a statue to me in this town!" To which Alice replies: "Sure they will, Ralph. And they'll call it the Tower of Babble."
BOOKS
May 3, 1992 | KAREN STABINER
JACKIE GLEASON: An Intimate Portrait of the Great One by W. J. Weatherby (Pharos Books: $19.95; 288 pp.). Weatherby has served as biographer for an unlikely trio--James Baldwin (whom, like Gleason, he had known for decades), Salman Rushdie and now The Great One, comedian and actor Jackie Gleason. He first met his subject in 1961, when a rude snub of a reporter's request for an interview led to an apology and a night on the town.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2014
Sheila MacRae Actress-singer was on '60s 'Honeymooners' Sheila MacRae, 92, a versatile actress and singer who performed in a popular 1950s nightclub act with her husband, Gordon MacRae, and appeared opposite Jackie Gleason in his late '60s revival of "The Honeymooners," died Thursday night at the Lillian Booth Actors Home of the Actors Fund in Englewood, N.J. She had undergone surgery a few weeks ago and had apparently been recovering well...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2000 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jackie Gleason was dubbed "The Great One" long before Wayne Gretzky picked up a hockey stick and earned that nickname, so it's perhaps appropriate that TV Land will showcase "The Honeymooners" in a manner worthy of a king--or at least befitting a sitcom that helped gild TV's Golden Age. The nostalgic cable channel has restored roughly three minutes to each of the 39 episodes produced during the 1955-56 season that were excised for the broadcast of reruns in syndication.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Audrey Meadows, revered as the feisty Alice Kramden opposite Jackie Gleason's garrulous bus driver Ralph in television's comedy classic "The Honeymooners," has died. Meadows died of lung cancer at 8:50 p.m. Saturday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, hospital spokesman Ron Wise said Sunday. Relatives said she was 69. Meadows had concealed the terminal illness for more than a year, even from her sister and brother-in-law, entertainers Jayne Meadows and Steve Allen.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|