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Jackie Martling

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2001 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stand-up comedians need radio exposure, particularly the kind offered by "The Howard Stern Radio Show." In addition to Stern's sizable reach (at least 8.5 million listeners over the course of a week, according to the radio industry publication Talkers magazine), there is also the stamp of approval from Stern, who has the kind of clout to make an endorsement meaningful.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2001 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stand-up comedians need radio exposure, particularly the kind offered by "The Howard Stern Radio Show." In addition to Stern's sizable reach (at least 8.5 million listeners over the course of a week, according to the radio industry publication Talkers magazine), there is also the stamp of approval from Stern, who has the kind of clout to make an endorsement meaningful.
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BUSINESS
March 14, 2003 | Jeff Leeds, Times Staff Writer
Are you litigious? Shock jock Howard Stern on Thursday sued the ABC television network, alleging that the new series "Are You Hot? The Search for America's Sexiest People" is a blatant rip-off of a bit aired on his radio program. The lawsuit, filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court, accused the Walt Disney Co. network and other defendants of copying the "unique aspects" of a Stern radio segment in which members of his crew and other judges evaluate the bodies of in-studio contestants.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1997 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
The opening chapter of radio deejay Howard Stern's best-selling autobiographical riff "Private Parts" recalls the supposedly true story of a Long Island businessman who became so aroused by an on-air interview between Stern and a lesbian that he had to pull over to the side of the expressway during rush hour and relieve himself. That chapter is titled "My Philosophy," and it's no joke.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1997 | Donald Liebenson, Donald Liebenson is an occasional contributor to Calendar
In "Mr. Saturday Night," Buddy Young Jr., the iconic comedian portrayed by Billy Crystal, is skeptical of the young apprentice agent played by Helen Hunt, who has been assigned to him. After she fails a barrage of questions about classic comedians such as the Ritz Brothers, he summarily dismisses her.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2000 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was going on 2:30 a.m. at the Delta Hotel, and Jackie Martling was in a fine mood. "What'ya wanna know? You wanna know who he's [sleeping with]? I have no idea." He was talking about his boss, the recently separated Howard Stern. Martling, who is nicknamed "The Joke Man" on Stern's monolithic radio show because of his propensity for telling filthy jokes in his club act, was among the royalty here, at the 18th annual Just for Laughs comedy festival, held each July in Montreal.
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