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November 16, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bebop lives! Doubters are directed to the Jazz Bakery this weekend, where alto saxophonist Jackie McLean and pianist Cedar Walton are not simply reviving the revolutionary jazz of the '40s and '50s, they're proving its continued vitality. McLean comes from a slightly younger generation than such bebop founders as Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie and Bud Powell.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2006 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Jackie McLean's introduction as a player to Birdland in New York City would become a legendary story in jazz. A protege of both pianist Bud Powell and saxophonist Charlie Parker, McLean was building a solid reputation in small bands in Harlem as an emerging force on saxophone. He was not yet 21, however, and was plenty nervous when he showed up at Birdland one night, not to listen to the great musicians that came through town -- as he often had over the years -- but to play.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2006 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Jackie McLean's introduction as a player to Birdland in New York City would become a legendary story in jazz. A protege of both pianist Bud Powell and saxophonist Charlie Parker, McLean was building a solid reputation in small bands in Harlem as an emerging force on saxophone. He was not yet 21, however, and was plenty nervous when he showed up at Birdland one night, not to listen to the great musicians that came through town -- as he often had over the years -- but to play.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bebop lives! Doubters are directed to the Jazz Bakery this weekend, where alto saxophonist Jackie McLean and pianist Cedar Walton are not simply reviving the revolutionary jazz of the '40s and '50s, they're proving its continued vitality. McLean comes from a slightly younger generation than such bebop founders as Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie and Bud Powell.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | Don Heckman
Recorded in the studio with a "live" audience, "Dynasty" easily re-establishes Jackie McLean as one of the world's pre-eminent jazz alto saxophonists. What a pleasure it is to hear his passionately wailing alto saxophone sound again. In an era of David Sanborn clones, McLean's warmly variable musical personality, a redefinition of the horn's capabilities, is welcome, indeed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1990
"I don't like it when people point the finger at Charlie Parker for his drug use, or at any of those guys back then, because they weren't responsible for it. They weren't the ones who brought heroin into the neighborhoods; they weren't the ones making a profit from it. They were the ones who were the victims of it."--Jazz saxophonist Jackie McLean, in the Hartford Courant
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1992 | ZAN STEWART and New albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor) to four (excellent). A rating of five stars is reserved for classic reissues or retrospectives.
* * 1/2 Jackie McLean, "Rhythm of the Earth," Birdology. The respected altoist has made a '90s version of his mid-'60s classic "Destination Out." Alto sax, vibes and trombone occupy the front line now as they did then, and many of the tunes are angular and edgy, providing a visceral tableau for the leader's biting-toned essays. The reflective "For Hofsa" and the inviting "Dark Castle" offer a respite of mellifluousness. Recommended for dedicated McLean fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Jackie McLean, who introduced his band at Catalina's Bar and Grill on Tuesday, represents the second of three jazz generations. His father was a name band guitarist; his son, Rene, like Jackie a gifted saxophonist, has contributed compositions to the latter's library. In fact, one of Rene McLean's original works bore a title, "Time for Change," that seemed symbolic of what both men have contributed over the years.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1994 | DON HECKMAN
Jackie McLean is a be-bop dinosaur. One of the few surviving horn players who can claim a direct lineage to Charlie Parker, Bud Powell and Miles Davis, he continues, at 62, to be among the most identifiably personal voices in jazz. McLean's opening night appearance at Catalina Bar & Grill on Tuesday, however, did not always display the alto saxophonist at his finest.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1993 | ZAN STEWART
JACKIE McLEAN "The Jackie Mac Attack Live" Birdology * * * There's no mistaking altoist McLean, who is startling, both for his prodigious technique and his completely original sound. At times as tart as a bite into a lemon, the jazz great's tone also can be as in-your-face as an angry customer demanding a refund or as comforting as a heavy blanket on a chilly fall night. This six-tune assemblage, recorded in Belgium in April, 1991, takes us on a tour of McLean's musical world.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1998 | Don Heckman
Jazz in the '90s may not have the innovative stars it did in the '50s and '60s, but there's no denying its diversity, especially in the latter half of the decade. And there are some distinctly promising new stars beginning to glow in the immediate horizon. Take the jazz saxophone. These four new recordings--two from veteran players, two from young artists in their early outings as leaders--are fascinating examples of ways in which stylistic trends are reexamined and redeveloped into new ideas.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Those who cheered Keith Jarrett's improvisationally rich piano performance at the Wiltern Theatre this past Sunday would do well to check out pianist Geri Allen's run this week at Catalina Bar & Grill. Allen's opening set Tuesday showed she shares Jarrett's far-reaching sense of exploration, though she possesses a decidedly different, but equally valid style. Like Jarrett, Allen takes standard material and fashions it in her own image.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1994 | DON HECKMAN
Jackie McLean is a be-bop dinosaur. One of the few surviving horn players who can claim a direct lineage to Charlie Parker, Bud Powell and Miles Davis, he continues, at 62, to be among the most identifiably personal voices in jazz. McLean's opening night appearance at Catalina Bar & Grill on Tuesday, however, did not always display the alto saxophonist at his finest.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1994 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jackie McLean's stomach was doing flip-flops when he entered the recording studio in New York back in 1951. He had reasons: The now-renowned altoist was just 19 and this recording session--led by Miles Davis, and including such soon-to-be-giants as tenor saxophonist Sonny Rollins and drummer Art Blakey--was McLean's first. McLean says he looked around the room and he almost froze: Sitting on a chair in the background, minding his own business, was his idol, the alto genius Charlie Parker.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1993 | ZAN STEWART
JACKIE McLEAN "The Jackie Mac Attack Live" Birdology * * * There's no mistaking altoist McLean, who is startling, both for his prodigious technique and his completely original sound. At times as tart as a bite into a lemon, the jazz great's tone also can be as in-your-face as an angry customer demanding a refund or as comforting as a heavy blanket on a chilly fall night. This six-tune assemblage, recorded in Belgium in April, 1991, takes us on a tour of McLean's musical world.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1992 | ZAN STEWART and New albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor) to four (excellent). A rating of five stars is reserved for classic reissues or retrospectives.
* * 1/2 Jackie McLean, "Rhythm of the Earth," Birdology. The respected altoist has made a '90s version of his mid-'60s classic "Destination Out." Alto sax, vibes and trombone occupy the front line now as they did then, and many of the tunes are angular and edgy, providing a visceral tableau for the leader's biting-toned essays. The reflective "For Hofsa" and the inviting "Dark Castle" offer a respite of mellifluousness. Recommended for dedicated McLean fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1988 | ZAN STEWART
Jackie McLean, the alto saxophonist with an edgy, provocative sound and a keen ear for picking the right notes, has changed. "I'm not Jackie Mclean of the '60s, I'm Jackie McLean of the '80s," he said recently. These days, besides playing his horn, the 56-year-old jazzman also heads the African American Music Department at the University of Hartford (Conn.) and he's the founder of the Artists' Collective, an arts program for Hartford's inner-city youth.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Those who cheered Keith Jarrett's improvisationally rich piano performance at the Wiltern Theatre this past Sunday would do well to check out pianist Geri Allen's run this week at Catalina Bar & Grill. Allen's opening set Tuesday showed she shares Jarrett's far-reaching sense of exploration, though she possesses a decidedly different, but equally valid style. Like Jarrett, Allen takes standard material and fashions it in her own image.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | Don Heckman
Recorded in the studio with a "live" audience, "Dynasty" easily re-establishes Jackie McLean as one of the world's pre-eminent jazz alto saxophonists. What a pleasure it is to hear his passionately wailing alto saxophone sound again. In an era of David Sanborn clones, McLean's warmly variable musical personality, a redefinition of the horn's capabilities, is welcome, indeed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1990
"I don't like it when people point the finger at Charlie Parker for his drug use, or at any of those guys back then, because they weren't responsible for it. They weren't the ones who brought heroin into the neighborhoods; they weren't the ones making a profit from it. They were the ones who were the victims of it."--Jazz saxophonist Jackie McLean, in the Hartford Courant
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