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Jackie Presser

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1985
President Reagan's major labor leader supporter, Jackie Presser, it has been revealed, acted "without criminal intent" in the payroll-padding scheme with alleged mob figures involving his (Presser's) Teamsters Local 507 in Cleveland. It was done with FBI permission, and Presser claims he acted as an informer to help root out the culprits and corruption. This should place him in line for a Freedom Medal, a series by Garry Trudeau, and an explanation to the media and its readers by prolific letter writer, Stephen S. Trott, chief of the Justice Department's Criminal Division, on how "we have sent a message."
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NEWS
April 2, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The widow of Teamsters President Jackie Presser admitted to stealing from his estate, most of which had been left to his two children by a previous marriage. Cynthia Presser, 47, was accused of taking $650,000 while failing to pay into his children's trust funds. She pleaded guilty in Cleveland to one count of aggravated grand theft. She faces up to 15 years in prison. Presser died in 1988 at the age of 61 while under federal indictment for allegedly masterminding an embezzlement scheme.
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NEWS
November 10, 1987 | Associated Press
The Teamsters Union today denied as "totally groundless" a published report that Jackie Presser has been replaced as president of the 1.5-million-member union. The Chicago Sun-Times reported today that Presser will be succeeded by Weldon Mathis, the second-highest officer in the union. Mathis, the Teamsters' general secretary-treasurer, denied Monday night that Presser is relinquishing his powers. "That's not true at all," he said. "We expect him back in 30 days."
NEWS
May 25, 1994 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Teamsters President Jackie Presser was one of the nation's most controversial union chiefs when he died in 1988. At the time, he was under indictment on racketeering charges, a case his attorney had staved off by citing his role for more than a decade as a secret informant for the FBI. Now, a dispute over his surprisingly large $4.2-million estate has surfaced in state court.
BOOKS
October 22, 1989 | Bob Sipchen
People who remember Jackie Presser when he was a wild young kid in the Cleveland suburb of Glenville, attending the same continuation school as future Mafia hit man and informant Jimmy "the Weasel" Fratianno, didn't think highly of him if they thought of him at all. "He was a nothing," recalled one Cleveland neighbor. "If you ask, did I expect him to end up in the jug, I say yeah. But to end up with President Reagan and the bigwigs and intelligentsia, no."
NEWS
May 25, 1994 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Teamsters President Jackie Presser was one of the nation's most controversial union chiefs when he died in 1988. At the time, he was under indictment on racketeering charges, a case his attorney had staved off by citing his role for more than a decade as a secret informant for the FBI. Now, a dispute over his surprisingly large $4.2-million estate has surfaced in state court.
NEWS
July 2, 1988 | Associated Press
Teamsters President Jackie Presser, stricken with brain cancer and hospitalized with a lung clot, had a clot-catching screen implanted in a vein below his kidneys, a hospital spokesman said Friday. Presser's vital signs were good after the surgery Thursday, Lakewood Hospital spokesman David Hopcraf said. The 61-year-old labor leader was hospitalized just hours after the government filed a lawsuit Tuesday in New York to break the Mafia's alleged domination of the 1.6-million-member Teamsters.
NEWS
March 20, 1987
Teamsters leader Jackie Presser won a victory in his fight against federal embezzlement and labor racketeering charges when a federal judge ordered Justice Department lawyers to turn over documents that had been withheld by the government. Presser's defense lawyer, John R. Climaco, had argued at a Cleveland hearing last week before U.S. District Judge George W. White that the government was unjustly refusing to turn over thousands of documents regarding Presser.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1986
Although the guilt or innocence of the former White House Chief of Staff, Michael K. Deaver, and teamster president, Jackie Presser, is still to be established, it is significant that both have been quoted as follows as listed on page one of the The Times. (May 17) Deaver--"After five months of leaks, rumors and innuendoes, today it's my turn." Presser--He welcomes his day in court to end "a five year pattern of insinuations and leaks of false information." Have they been talking to each other?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1985
It is a sad, sad state of affairs when we learn that both the President of the United States, Ronald Reagan, while head of the Screen Actors Guild, and Jackie Presser, head of the Teamsters Union, were informers for the FBI. It dismays me that persons in positions of trust can betray their fellow workers in the name of self-interest and "patriotism." I recall attending a New York subway workers' rally during those years when Mike Quill, head of that union, said, "I'd rather be called a Red by a rat, than be called a rat by a Red."
NEWS
September 6, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jackie Presser, the late Teamster president who had close ties with the Mafia and was an FBI informant, is a perfect metaphor for our times. So believes Oscar-winning Abby Mann ("Judgment at Nuremberg"), the writer and co-executive producer of HBO's new movie "Teamster Boss: The Jackie Presser Story," starring Brian Dennehy as Presser. "Here is a guy who was working both the Mafia and the FBI without either one of them knowing it," Mann said. "I don't see him as a villain.
BOOKS
October 22, 1989 | Bob Sipchen
People who remember Jackie Presser when he was a wild young kid in the Cleveland suburb of Glenville, attending the same continuation school as future Mafia hit man and informant Jimmy "the Weasel" Fratianno, didn't think highly of him if they thought of him at all. "He was a nothing," recalled one Cleveland neighbor. "If you ask, did I expect him to end up in the jug, I say yeah. But to end up with President Reagan and the bigwigs and intelligentsia, no."
NEWS
April 29, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Former Teamsters Union president Roy Lee Williams, who served three years in prison for bribery and acknowledged that his union was under the influence of organized crime, died Friday at his farm home here. He was 74, and suffered from emphysema and heart ailments. Williams, a protege of former Teamsters president Jimmy Hoffa, who with Dave Beck was the third Teamsters leader in 25 years to be imprisoned, was international president of the union from 1981 to 1983. He was forced to resign after he and four co-defendants were convicted in December, 1982, of trying to bribe former U.S. Sen. Howard Cannon of Nevada to influence trucking deregulation.
NEWS
April 5, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Teamsters President William J. McCarthy, denouncing his two predecessors as "a schemer" and "a liar," Tuesday denied any personal links to organized crime and contended that allegations of widespread corruption in his union are "vastly" exaggerated.
NEWS
February 8, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
Jackie Presser, the late president of the Teamsters Union, admitted that the nation's largest union was infiltrated by organized crime and he became a government informant to clean it up, the FBI's top investigator has said in the first sworn statement in the case by a high-ranking bureau official. The deposition of Oliver B. Revell, the bureau's executive assistant director for investigations, was taken by Teamster attorneys.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | Associated Press
Wrapping up a 2 1/2-month labor racketeering trial, a federal prosecutor argued Tuesday that Teamsters union President Jackie Presser and two associates embezzled $700,000 to pay "friends or cronies" who did no union work. In closing arguments to jurors in U.S. District Court, prosecutor Stephen Jigger stressed the role of Presser's associates in the alleged embezzlement scheme. Presser died last July, more than two years after his indictment in the case.
NEWS
December 27, 1988 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
When the late Teamsters Union President Jackie Presser was supplying the FBI with information about organized crime, he was so afraid that his secret role would be disclosed that he insisted that the bureau, which usually commits everything it learns to paper, not even keep an official file on him. Instead, a Cleveland FBI supervisor filled seven spiral notebooks with handwritten notes of conversations with Presser.
NEWS
December 3, 1988 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
A former FBI agent, who once handled the late Teamsters President Jackie Presser when he served as a secret government informant, refused to testify Friday at the trial of two Presser associates. He was promptly held in contempt of court. The action against ex-agent Robert S. Friedrick is believed to be the first time a past or present FBI agent ever has been cited for contempt for refusing to testify at a criminal trial. Friedrick invoked his 5th Amendment protection against self-incrimination.
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