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Jackie Robinson Foundation

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December 8, 1991 | ROSS NEWHAN
Rachel Robinson, wife of the late Jackie Robinson, who broke baseball's color barrier in 1947, said that her New York-based Jackie Robinson Foundation has formed a committee to study minority participation in sports and apply team-by-team pressure, particularly in baseball, to accelerate minority hiring. "Baseball has had 40-plus years to work on it, and obviously little has been done," she said of the fact that there are only two minority managers in the major leagues and no general managers.
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SPORTS
April 13, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
The men had celebrated into the wee hours of the morning. Sleep would come, later. The Dodgers were theirs, and for the first time these men could introduce themselves as owners rather than bidders. Mark Walter, the incoming chairman, sat in a conference room, patiently explaining that, no, the new owners did not believe they had overpaid. Stan Kasten, the incoming president, talked about supporting the Dodgers' thin front office rather than dismantling it. Magic Johnson had plenty to say too, but he took a moment.
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SPORTS
March 30, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
The first words Magic Johnson spoke in an interview Wednesday had nothing to do with the price his group paid to buy the Dodgers, or how he would make the team better. "Jackie Robinson," Johnson said. Johnson talked about how honored and humbled he was -- not only to become one of the first African Americans to own a share of a Major League Baseball team, but to do so with the team with which Robinson broke baseball's color barrier. Johnson has reached out to Rachel Robinson, the widow of Jackie Robinson.
SPORTS
October 27, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
- Jackie Robinson's daughter said Saturday she has agreed to join the Dodgers' board of directors, strengthening the bond between the team and its most historically significant alumnus. Sharon Robinson said she would represent her family and the Jackie Robinson Foundation on the Dodgers' board. In return, she said, the Dodgers' new owners would select a representative to serve on the board of the Jackie Robinson Foundation. Sharon Robinson appeared at Yankee Stadium last April 15, on the anniversary of the day her father broke the major league color barrier with the Brooklyn Dodgers.
SPORTS
April 15, 1997
Threatened with fines because league rules specify that all players must wear sleeves the same length, the Cincinnati Reds decided as a team Monday to alter their uniforms to match the style Deion Sanders went to after he saw a picture of Jackie Robinson. Robinson wore his uniform sleeves short and his socks pulled up high, another fashion s Sanders is emulating. He also is playing something like Robinson, with an an NL-leading 10 stolen bases through the Reds first 12 games.
NEWS
November 25, 1998 | BOOTH MOORE
More than 1,000 people came together at the Hollywood American Legion Saturday in the name of baseball legend and civil rights activist Jackie Robinson. L.A.'s Friends of Jackie Robinson Foundation held its "EX3 '98--Extravaganza of Entertainment for Education" for the second year. The name may be convoluted, but the cause is simple: to raise college tuition for underprivileged youths. "Jackie exemplified how one person could make a difference," foundation President Steven Brown said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1997 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the baseball pennant races heating up, it's the perfect time to check out some new baseball videos. This year marks the 50th anniversary of Brooklyn Dodger legend Jackie Robinson shattering the major league color barrier. Robinson changed the sports world forever when he stepped up to bat as a Dodger on April 15, 1947. To commemorate this landmark achievement, Major League Home Video has just released "Jackie Robinson: Breaking Barriers" (Orion, $15).
SPORTS
March 4, 2004 | From Associated Press
The New York Yankees won't rehire Jason Giambi's personal trainer, meaning Bobby Alejo cannot travel on team charters this season and can't supervise Giambi's pregame and postgame workouts in ballparks. After Commissioner Bud Selig's decision last month to enforce rules restricting clubhouse access, Giambi expressed hope that an arrangement could be worked out. "I think Jason is hopeful there is some avenue to work through," Yankee General Manager Brian Cashman said Wednesday.
NEWS
March 31, 1997
"Jackie Robinson opened the door of baseball to all men. He was the first to get the opportunity, but if he had not done such a great job, the path would have been so much more difficult." --Former New York Giant Monte Irvin, after Robinson's death in 1972. * Many African Americans followed Robinson to the major leagues, not immediately and not without controversy.
SPORTS
June 23, 1994 | JIM MURRAY
Jackie Robinson's name stands for the flag, brotherhood, equality, democracy, tolerance, Americanism--everything good about America. That's because he symbolizes the righting of an ancient wrong. Quicker than you could say Jack Robinson, Jim Crow was gone from our national sport. It seems hard to believe now but for more than half a century, black men were barred from participating in a game and a country that should have been as democratic as the Declaration of Independence.
SPORTS
April 15, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
NEW YORK - As baseball celebrates the 65th anniversary of Jackie Robinson breaking the color barrier for the Dodgers, the new stewards of his old team are working to embrace his family in the incoming ownership group. Sharon Robinson, the daughter of the late Hall of Fame infielder, confirmed Sunday the Dodgers' incoming owners have invited the Robinson family and its foundation to play a significant role with the team. "We hope that we will be involved," Sharon Robinson said.
SPORTS
March 30, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
The first words Magic Johnson spoke in an interview Wednesday had nothing to do with the price his group paid to buy the Dodgers, or how he would make the team better. "Jackie Robinson," Johnson said. Johnson talked about how honored and humbled he was -- not only to become one of the first African Americans to own a share of a Major League Baseball team, but to do so with the team with which Robinson broke baseball's color barrier. Johnson has reached out to Rachel Robinson, the widow of Jackie Robinson.
SPORTS
March 4, 2004 | From Associated Press
The New York Yankees won't rehire Jason Giambi's personal trainer, meaning Bobby Alejo cannot travel on team charters this season and can't supervise Giambi's pregame and postgame workouts in ballparks. After Commissioner Bud Selig's decision last month to enforce rules restricting clubhouse access, Giambi expressed hope that an arrangement could be worked out. "I think Jason is hopeful there is some avenue to work through," Yankee General Manager Brian Cashman said Wednesday.
NEWS
November 25, 1998 | BOOTH MOORE
More than 1,000 people came together at the Hollywood American Legion Saturday in the name of baseball legend and civil rights activist Jackie Robinson. L.A.'s Friends of Jackie Robinson Foundation held its "EX3 '98--Extravaganza of Entertainment for Education" for the second year. The name may be convoluted, but the cause is simple: to raise college tuition for underprivileged youths. "Jackie exemplified how one person could make a difference," foundation President Steven Brown said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1997 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the baseball pennant races heating up, it's the perfect time to check out some new baseball videos. This year marks the 50th anniversary of Brooklyn Dodger legend Jackie Robinson shattering the major league color barrier. Robinson changed the sports world forever when he stepped up to bat as a Dodger on April 15, 1947. To commemorate this landmark achievement, Major League Home Video has just released "Jackie Robinson: Breaking Barriers" (Orion, $15).
SPORTS
April 15, 1997
Threatened with fines because league rules specify that all players must wear sleeves the same length, the Cincinnati Reds decided as a team Monday to alter their uniforms to match the style Deion Sanders went to after he saw a picture of Jackie Robinson. Robinson wore his uniform sleeves short and his socks pulled up high, another fashion s Sanders is emulating. He also is playing something like Robinson, with an an NL-leading 10 stolen bases through the Reds first 12 games.
SPORTS
April 13, 1997 | LEONARD COLEMAN, FOR THE SPORTING NEWS; Leonard S. Coleman Jr. is president of the National League. This story contains remarks he made at a news conference on Feb. 26, 1997
I grew up in a two-family house. On the first floor, my father was a Giants fan, and my mother was a Dodgers fan; on the second floor, my uncle was a Yankees fan. The wars we had in the household over baseball were seemingly endless. And generally, those wars were carried on over dinner. The unifying force at 39 Central Ave. in Montclair, N.J., was Jackie Robinson. There was one thing we could all agree upon: We all rooted for Jackie. He provided tranquillity and unification at my dinner table.
SPORTS
September 9, 1987 | SCOTT OSTLER
Jackie Robinson has come home, in style and with dignity and, naturally, as the star of the show. The kid who grew up in Pasadena and attended UCLA is back in the neighborhood. Jackie Robinson died in 1972, but his memory is making a guest appearance at the California Afro-American Museum in Exposition Park. The touring exhibition is titled "Jackie Robinson: An American Journey." It's a real good exhibition, but not perfect.
SPORTS
April 13, 1997 | LEONARD COLEMAN, FOR THE SPORTING NEWS; Leonard S. Coleman Jr. is president of the National League. This story contains remarks he made at a news conference on Feb. 26, 1997
I grew up in a two-family house. On the first floor, my father was a Giants fan, and my mother was a Dodgers fan; on the second floor, my uncle was a Yankees fan. The wars we had in the household over baseball were seemingly endless. And generally, those wars were carried on over dinner. The unifying force at 39 Central Ave. in Montclair, N.J., was Jackie Robinson. There was one thing we could all agree upon: We all rooted for Jackie. He provided tranquillity and unification at my dinner table.
NEWS
March 31, 1997
"Jackie Robinson opened the door of baseball to all men. He was the first to get the opportunity, but if he had not done such a great job, the path would have been so much more difficult." --Former New York Giant Monte Irvin, after Robinson's death in 1972. * Many African Americans followed Robinson to the major leagues, not immediately and not without controversy.
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