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Jackie Sherill

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December 13, 1988 | Associated Press
Jackie Sherrill, the Texas A&M football coach and athletic director accused of paying hush money to a former player during a National Collegiate Athletic Assn. investigation, resigned Monday night, citing mental strain and his "love and respect" for the school. Sherrill, 45, was 53-27-1 at Texas A&M, including an 7-5 record this season. Defensive coordinator R.C. Slocum, a former USC assistant, was named to replace Sherrill as coach, and John David Crow was named athletic director.
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December 13, 1988 | Associated Press
Jackie Sherrill, the Texas A&M football coach and athletic director accused of paying hush money to a former player during a National Collegiate Athletic Assn. investigation, resigned Monday night, citing mental strain and his "love and respect" for the school. Sherrill, 45, was 53-27-1 at Texas A&M, including an 7-5 record this season. Defensive coordinator R.C. Slocum, a former USC assistant, was named to replace Sherrill as coach, and John David Crow was named athletic director.
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April 28, 1985 | GARY POMERANTZ, Washington Post
It is six months later and Billy Cannon Jr. says he still feels numbness; pins and needles tingling in both thumbs. But can there be anything so numbing as these past two years, when tragedy plundered one of Louisiana's sports symbols, the very name of Cannon? Before the tragedies, Billy Cannon Sr., the onetime Heisman Trophy winner, was a local hero of extraordinary proportions. His son, Billy Cannon Jr.
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October 25, 1987 | JOEL SHERMAN, United Press International
Sid Gillman, who probably forgets more football in a day than some coaches know, leaned back in his chair, put his hands on his thigh and looked up. "Let me tell you what I like about Mike Gottfried," said Gillman, 74. "He's like Dick Vermeil. He's so secure. He'll hire anybody he feels will provide some extra knowledge to help the organization. He doesn't care where they come from. It takes a super man to say anyone who can help will be brought in. "A lot of coaches, they don't want to do that.
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