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Jackie Tatum

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1992 | PENELOPE McMILLAN and JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Jackie Tatum, who started with the city as a $1.50-an-hour recreation center assistant, on Friday was named head of the Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks, the first woman to hold the position. Tatum, 59, will earn $129,519 a year as general manager, a post she formally assumes April 8. The biggest challenge before the department will be to stay afloat financially, Tatum told a City Hall press conference attended by Mayor Tom Bradley and J.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2013 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Councilman Bernard C. Parks unveiled six security cameras at Jackie Tatum Harvard Recreation Center on Thursday, an issue that stalled in the City Council for months until a youth volunteer was gunned down in the park. The installation of the cameras marks the second phase of a multi-year project to revamp the South L.A. park, once a popular hangout for a Bloods street gang. Parks started pushing for cameras last year after he discovered reputed gang members were intimidating park workers, blocking residents from using the city-owned space and shooting music videos in the park after it was supposed to be closed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1998 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before it has been settled or heard, a federal civil rights lawsuit filed against the city has focused renewed attention on a reality at city parks. Filed by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of the West Valley Girls Softball League, the lawsuit accuses the city of discriminating against girls by relegating the league's teams to shabby fields while reserving premier diamonds for boys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1998 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before it has been settled or heard, a federal civil rights lawsuit filed against the city has focused renewed attention on a reality at city parks. Filed by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of the West Valley Girls Softball League, the lawsuit accuses the city of discriminating against girls by relegating the league's teams to shabby fields while reserving premier diamonds for boys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2013 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Councilman Bernard C. Parks unveiled six security cameras at Jackie Tatum Harvard Recreation Center on Thursday, an issue that stalled in the City Council for months until a youth volunteer was gunned down in the park. The installation of the cameras marks the second phase of a multi-year project to revamp the South L.A. park, once a popular hangout for a Bloods street gang. Parks started pushing for cameras last year after he discovered reputed gang members were intimidating park workers, blocking residents from using the city-owned space and shooting music videos in the park after it was supposed to be closed.
NEWS
October 30, 1986
Jackie Tatum, a community advocate at the Westside Center for Independent Living in Mar Vista, has been appointed chairman of the Citizens Advisory Committee on Accessible Transportation. The committee makes recommendations to the Southern California Rapid Transit District on issues affecting the elderly and people with disabilities. The center, 12901 Venice Blvd., provides support services, training and advocacy to people with disabilities.
NEWS
July 17, 1986
Jackie Tatum has been appointed to the newly created position of community advocate for the Westside Community for Independent Living. She will work on such projects as lengthening the duration of walk signals at some street crosswalks, developing a standardized procedure for obtaining curb cuts and handicapped parking spots and watching local, state and federal legislation that might affect people with disabilities. The Westside Community for Independent Living, 12901 Venice Blvd.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1989
Jackie Tatum, a 33-year veteran of the Los Angeles Recreation and Parks Department, has been named assistant general manager of the Valley Region, making her the highest-ranking black woman in the department. James E. Hadaway, general manager of the department, appointed Tatum to the $70,490-a-year post on Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1989
About two dozen disabled people and supporters told a Los Angeles Human Relations Commission on Thursday that public transportation problems are preventing them from being active participants in society. "Many disabled people are complaining about driver attitude," Betty Wilson, director of the Mayor's Office of the Disabled, told the commission during the City Hall hearing. "Buses pass disabled persons and fail to stop. Drivers don't know how to use lifts." Jackie Tatum, of the Westside Independent Living Center, said the problem has become so bad that "the reality is that people with disabilities do not feel the RTD is a viable solution to their transportation needs."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1994
MacArthur Park is not typically considered the artistic center of Los Angeles, but city officials this week imposed a moratorium on the placement of art within the park, saying it has become cluttered with cultural wares. There are more than 25 statues, plaques, murals and fountains within MacArthur Park, which officials say stems from the park's proximity to the Otis-Parsons Institute of Art and Design.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1992 | PENELOPE McMILLAN and JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Jackie Tatum, who started with the city as a $1.50-an-hour recreation center assistant, on Friday was named head of the Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks, the first woman to hold the position. Tatum, 59, will earn $129,519 a year as general manager, a post she formally assumes April 8. The biggest challenge before the department will be to stay afloat financially, Tatum told a City Hall press conference attended by Mayor Tom Bradley and J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1996 | KAY HWANGBO
The fate of a popular park director remains up in the air after a city Recreation and Parks Department announcement Friday that it has not decided whether to reassign Jon Klay. Klay, director of the Studio City Recreation Center, was the subject of a petition drive by park users who sought to keep him at the park. Klay's supporters praised Klay as someone who expanded programming and created a sense of community at the park.
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