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Jackie Winsor

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February 13, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS, Cathy Curtis covers art for The Times Orange County Edition.
A rare and lovely thing can happen when you look at the sculptures of Jackie Winsor, the subject of a Milwaukee Art Museum retrospective exhibiton view through March 31 at Newport Harbor Art Museum. Now, I don't mean just glancing at these pieces, the way so many of us glide aimlessly through museums.
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NEWS
February 13, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS, Cathy Curtis covers art for The Times Orange County Edition.
A rare and lovely thing can happen when you look at the sculptures of Jackie Winsor, the subject of a Milwaukee Art Museum retrospective exhibiton view through March 31 at Newport Harbor Art Museum. Now, I don't mean just glancing at these pieces, the way so many of us glide aimlessly through museums.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS
Sculptor Jackie Winsor--whose immaculately plain-spoken, soberly handcrafted work from the past two decades is at the Newport Harbor Art Museum through March 29--was born in 1941 on the island of Newfoundland in Eastern Canada. Growing up in a succession of fishing villages, her favorite companions were rocks, trees and the ocean. The family moved to Boston when she was 11, but she returned to her beloved outdoors during summer vacations.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS
Sculptor Jackie Winsor--whose immaculately plain-spoken, soberly handcrafted work from the past two decades is at the Newport Harbor Art Museum through March 29--was born in 1941 on the island of Newfoundland in Eastern Canada. Growing up in a succession of fishing villages, her favorite companions were rocks, trees and the ocean. The family moved to Boston when she was 11, but she returned to her beloved outdoors during summer vacations.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1987 | COLIN GARDNER
Alan Belcher is a young Canadian who explores photographic images--the way they are co-opted by commercial art and their potential as political agents provocateurs. Punningly titled "Traveling Exhibition," the show consists of fabricated luggage covered with photographs that subvert the object's utilitarian function. A group of three cases are plastered with photos of firearms, as if to blatantly advertise their terrorist contents to any suspicious customs official.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS
Many curators of contemporary art confess--in private, at least--an impatience with the public, with all those folks who would rather be looking at cheerful Impressionist paintings than patiently decoding the mysteries of post-minimalist sculpture. But Bruce Guenther, the new chief curator at Newport Harbor Art Museum, thinks otherwise. In fact, he views art museums as "a service industry" with the curator as "a facilitator" between the artistic community and the general public.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1992 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Einstein once said that the simplest solutions are the most elegant. That's something Jackie Winsor seems to know. She's a New York abstract sculptor who, at 51, is regarded as among the leaders of her generation. Despite that prepossessing reputation, her work has never been seen in depth on the West Coast until now.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS, Cathy Curtis covers art for The Times Orange County Edition.
Everybody knows the difference between drawing and photography. But "The Encompassing Eye: Photography as Drawing," an exhibit of historical and contemporary images (organized by the Emily Davis Gallery of the University of Akron) at the Laguna Art Museum through May 24, suggests that there is a special link between the two activities. The story starts in 1833, with gentleman scientist William Henry Fox Talbot's honeymoon on the shores of Lake Como in Switzerland.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1994 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The exhibition "Percept/Image/Object" pinpoints the differences between seeing and knowing. At the Lannan Foundation, seeing isn't believing, and knowing isn't what we thought it was. In the foyer, nine small lithographs by Gerhard Richter alert us to the fact that art doesn't always obey the rules of the ordinary world. In one picture, the armature of a cube sits in a lawn chair. Closer inspection reveals that this geometric form behaves like a pretzel.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS
Nearly 20 years ago, at the height of the women's movement, a plethora of exhibitions and books began calling attention to women artists, famous and forgotten, past and present. Archives were combed, tape recorders were switched on, dim corners of museums were scrutinized, and decades of assumptions about the way women's art is made, promoted, exhibited and assessed began to be questioned.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS
In a long interview in The Times Orange County Edition last month, Newport Harbor Art Museum Director Michael Botwinick remarked that his institution was considering some changes in the way it goes about showing contemporary art. His main goal seemed to be to make the museum more appealing to a broader spectrum of viewers. "Up until now, our existence has been driven entirely by our exhibition schedule," he said, "and that has achieved some notable successes in terms of our reputation.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1993 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call it "The Year of the Upstart" in Orange County art. While some well-known institutions offered cautious, confused or vacuous programming, other venues cut loose and got clever. (And please don't heap all your blame for the negative portion of that assessment on the disastrous economy; I'll buy that only if you can prove to me that it costs more to think creatively and credit the viewing public with some smarts and a healthy dose of attitude.
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