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Jackson Barnett

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1995 | Cecilia Rasmussen
He was called the "richest Indian in America," but his tastes didn't run to polo or champagne. Rather, Jackson Barnett's interests were--quite literally--pedestrian. Before and during the Depression, Barnett was one of Los Angeles' living landmarks, standing day after day on the northeast corner of Rossmore Avenue and Wilshire Boulevard--always impeccably dressed in a three-piece suit and always doing the same thing: directing traffic.
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BOOKS
November 16, 2003 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to the Book Review, is the author of the forthcoming "God Against the Gods: The History of the War Between Monotheism and Polytheism."
Among the sorriest excesses in the recent gubernatorial campaign in California was the vilifying of candidates who were supported by Native Americans.
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BOOKS
November 16, 2003 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to the Book Review, is the author of the forthcoming "God Against the Gods: The History of the War Between Monotheism and Polytheism."
Among the sorriest excesses in the recent gubernatorial campaign in California was the vilifying of candidates who were supported by Native Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1995 | Cecilia Rasmussen
He was called the "richest Indian in America," but his tastes didn't run to polo or champagne. Rather, Jackson Barnett's interests were--quite literally--pedestrian. Before and during the Depression, Barnett was one of Los Angeles' living landmarks, standing day after day on the northeast corner of Rossmore Avenue and Wilshire Boulevard--always impeccably dressed in a three-piece suit and always doing the same thing: directing traffic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2006
May 29, 1934: Jackson Barnett, a Creek Indian whose Oklahoma tribal land was the site of a lucrative oil strike in 1912, died in Los Angeles at 93. "Jackson Barnett, reputedly the world's richest Indian, was found dead yesterday in his palatial Colonial mansion at Wilshire Boulevard and Rossmore Avenue," The Times reported on the front page. It said Barnett had been a man of simple tastes who liked to direct traffic in front of his home.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1993 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Mark Tansey's paintings describe philosophical conundrums, sometimes with wit and always with intelligence. Yet, they're most notable for a frankly peculiar tone, which registers its odd chord somewhere between world-weary ennui over the reigning intellectual doctrines of the day and an unearned certainty about the artist's own direction that seems principally predicated on old-fashioned faith. Tansey's work is at once enormously likable and distinctly unexciting.
NEWS
February 15, 1994 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Donald Judd, prominent American postwar artist who spearheaded the minimalist art movement, has died at age 65. Judd, who had homes in Manhattan, Marfa, Tex., and in Switzerland, died Saturday in New York City of lymphoma. The artist preferred to work with solid geometric forms and was best known for his repetitive outsize boxes of stainless steel or plexiglass. He refused to call his art-form sculpture, claiming that word implied carving when his objects were factory built.
REAL ESTATE
January 25, 1987 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Nobody knows exactly when Dorothy Maltz took the free bus ride and lunch for prospective buyers in a housing tract in what is now Westchester. Before she died in 1984, she left what was called the "Travelogue of the H.V. Bagwell Co.," which gives some history about Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1986 | ROBERT McDONALD
Ernest Silva's new work at the Quint Gallery enhances his position as one of the stellar artists in this area with an emerging national reputation. It's a modest exhibition of a dozen drawings and one large painting, but it is a visually rich experience that merits time for contemplation.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1996 | Michael McCall, Michael McCall is a free-lance writer based in Nashville
Three women commanded Nashville's attention during 1995, and their stories represent the spectrum of conflict, and the glint of optimism currently spreading through the city's country music industry. They couldn't be more different: * Shania Twain. She's a Canadian singer whose upbeat, pop-influenced songs provided country music with its biggest commercial breakthrough in 1995. Her "Woman in Me" album sold nearly 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2004 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley announced Friday that he would not prosecute a former Inglewood police officer a third time on a charge of assaulting a teenager during an arrest caught on tape and broadcast worldwide. Cooley said he did not believe 12 jurors could agree on whether Jeremy Morse broke the law when he picked up Donovan Jackson and slammed him onto a patrol car. The first jury deadlocked 7 to 5 for conviction and the second jury split 6 to 6.
SPORTS
September 4, 1992 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the Philadelphia Eagles, life in pro football this year could be either bad or beautiful. The Eagles are the NFL's 1992 enigma. No other pro club carries more seeds of promise or, potentially, trouble. Or pressure. It will be a Philadelphia Super Bowl this season, many are saying. They suggest that, for the first time, the Eagles can combine the NFL's best defense with the game's best running quarterback, Randall Cunningham, who missed last season because of a knee injury.
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