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TRAVEL
January 14, 2007 | Lauren M. Whaley, Special to The Times
WEARING four layers of clothing, you shoulder your skis and head to the first of four lifts that will carry you to the top of the newly tramless mountain. That's what it will take this year -- and next -- to access Rendezvous Mountain's 10,924-foot summit in Jackson Hole, one of the nation's premier ski destinations. Until this season, 55 skiers at a time could huddle inside the aerial tram for a 12-minute ride up the mountain.
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TRAVEL
January 14, 2007 | Lauren M. Whaley, Special to The Times
WEARING four layers of clothing, you shoulder your skis and head to the first of four lifts that will carry you to the top of the newly tramless mountain. That's what it will take this year -- and next -- to access Rendezvous Mountain's 10,924-foot summit in Jackson Hole, one of the nation's premier ski destinations. Until this season, 55 skiers at a time could huddle inside the aerial tram for a 12-minute ride up the mountain.
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NEWS
August 19, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was billed as the kind of national park vacation enjoyed by countless average Americans. But for President Clinton, apparently it's no joy to be under a big Western sky with no stars. In the first evening outing of a planned 17-day trip, the President and Hillary Rodham Clinton holed up until early Friday at the secluded 800-acre ranch of actor Harrison Ford next to the Snake River.
NEWS
August 19, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was billed as the kind of national park vacation enjoyed by countless average Americans. But for President Clinton, apparently it's no joy to be under a big Western sky with no stars. In the first evening outing of a planned 17-day trip, the President and Hillary Rodham Clinton holed up until early Friday at the secluded 800-acre ranch of actor Harrison Ford next to the Snake River.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2002 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Elliott E. Blinderman, the Beverly Hills neurosurgeon who testified for passage of California's mandatory motorcycle helmet law a decade ago, has died. He was 70. Blinderman, who taught at UCLA School of Medicine and practiced at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, died Jan. 22 in a traffic collision while on vacation in Naples, Fla.
SPORTS
March 23, 1998 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Nine Cuban defectors, including four baseball players and a coach, were taken to a detention center in Nassau, the Bahamas, Sunday as an agent tried to ensure they would not be sent back to their communist homeland. Joe Cubas, a Cuban-American baseball agent, arrived in the Bahamas with money, clothes and food for the defectors.
OPINION
December 19, 1999 | Joel Kotkin, Joel Kotkin, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior fellow at the Pepperdine Institute of Public Policy and a research fellow at the Reason Foundation. His new book, "Repealing Geography: New Rules for Place in the Digital Age," will be published in September
The rise of the digital economy is repealing America's established patterns of economic and social geography. How place relates to the burgeoning information and media sectors will increasingly determine the geographic losers and winners of the next millennium. Since so much knowledge work can theoretically be performed anywhere, some have suggested that the shift to an information economy makes the very concept of place irrelevant. Yet, in reality, place matters more than ever.
TRAVEL
May 9, 1999 | KARIN ESTERHAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An India-born university professor will lead tourists to India and Sri Lanka from Jan. 8 to 29. The trip starts with a city tour of Singapore, where the group stops for a night on the way to India. In India participants will visit New Delhi, Agra and the Taj Mahal, Jaipur, Udaipur, Bombay, Goa, Cochin and Madras. In Sri Lanka, stops will be made at Colombo and Kandy.
OPINION
November 1, 1998 | Joel Kotkin, Joel Kotkin, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior fellow at the Pepperdine Institute for Public Policy and a research fellow at the Reason Public Policy Institute
From the earliest days of the republic, the American countryside has been seen as a bastion of egalitarianism. But today, large swaths of rural America, from the rocky coast of Maine to the Rocky Mountains, are marked by class warfare caused by the increasing migration of well-heeled full- and part-time residents from metropolitan society. This new migration is a reversal of historic U.S. migrant flows.
TRAVEL
June 17, 2001 | HENRY WHITEHEAD, Henry Whitehead lives in Los Angeles and will be a junior at Hamilton High School in the fall
Once, I was a Los Angeles city boy. You may know the kind. I like watching pro sports, especially basketball and baseball. I've been known to turn on the tube, although I read quite a bit. I like music, especially jazz and classic rock. Then I was transformed. It's not that I don't still love sports and reading and all. But I have some new loves too, the kind that make my heart race and make me yearn for more.
TRAVEL
September 22, 2002 | AMANDA JONES
It was an autumn day in Grand Teton National Park. The sky was an immaculate blue, the mountains towered stark ahead, and the aspens and cottonwoods gleamed with umbers and saffrons, shedding a mosaic of leaves on the trail. My husband, Greg, and I were hiking above Jenny Lake when we encountered a trail marked Moose Pond. We took it, aware that a moose sighting was improbable, but we were hopeful anyway. Lagging, I rounded a corner and found Greg standing motionless on the trail.
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