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Jackson Memorial

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2009 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
The protracted departure of Michael Jackson from this world formally ended Tuesday morning with a private funeral at Forest Lawn and a public memorial at Staples Center. The first event was seen from afar, on television and so by the world, primarily as a sequence of arriving and departing black cars. The latter was planned from the start as a television event and carried live by all the major broadcast and cable news networks.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2010 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
An entertainment conglomerate and the estate of Michael Jackson have agreed to donate $1.3 million to the city of Los Angeles to help cover most of the costs of last year's memorial for the international recording artist at Staples Center, officials said Friday. Anschutz Entertainment Group, which hosted the Michael Jackson Memorial at its Staples Center and Nokia Theatre properties in downtown Los Angeles, announced the deal Friday in conjunction with Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2009 | Dan Weikel
About 1.6 million people have registered for a chance at 17,500 free tickets to Tuesday's memorial service for Michael Jackson at Staples Center and a nearby simulcast, officials at AEG, owner of the arena, said Saturday. Registration began at 10 a.m. Friday and ended at 6 p.m. Saturday. Those chosen will be notified by e-mail between 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. today. Each of the 8,750 people selected will get an exclusive code and instructions on how to obtain two free tickets Monday.
OPINION
December 11, 2009
Money always talks Re "Decision near on tab for Jackson service," Dec. 6 Once again, private campaign contributions influence public policy, as the City Council may not push Anschutz Entertainment Group to defray the public cost of the Michael Jackson memorial service. I take issue with Councilwoman Jan Perry's claim that it's a "stupid way to think" that AEG owns Los Angeles. I think it would be stupid to assume AEG gets no payback for its huge donations to city politicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2009 | Scott Collins
Just as Michael Jackson set records during his lifetime, so he continues after death. Tuesday's memorial service was one of the most-watched and most-discussed live news events in recent history, with some analysts even calling it a milestone for media integration as fans gathered around TV sets, computers and smart phones and traded information on Facebook and other social-media services. An average of 31.1 million TV viewers watched the memorial service, according to the Nielsen Co. The ceremony, which featured performances and tributes from Stevie Wonder, Brooke Shields and other celebrities, was carried live from approximately 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on 19 networks, including the major broadcast and cable-news outlets.
OPINION
July 7, 2009
Re "I got tickets: Jackson fans wait and hope," July 6 It is morally and ethically disgraceful that Michael Jackson's family should even consider (much less accept) that the city should use the emergency LAPD fund to pay any part of the cost of police coverage of the Staples Center memorial service, in light of the present fiscal emergency in the state. Or even without the recession. If the family and AEG want to stage a gigantic, public spectacle, they should foot the cost. Diana F. Grilli Los Angeles :: Why should the taxpayers of the city of Los Angeles pay for a memorial service for Jackson?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2009 | Phil Willon
Eleven Asian elephants marched briskly down Chick Hearn Court toward the neon glow of Staples Center and a thicket of news satellite trucks in the wee hours of Tuesday. The Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus was a day away, the Michael Jackson memorial extravaganza was hours away and the craziness already had begun for Los Angeles' stand-in mayor, City Councilwoman Jan Perry. "Full moon. That's not good," said Perry, who at 4:30 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2009 | Maeve Reston and Ari B. Bloomekatz
Hours after the last eulogy to Michael Jackson bounced off the rafters of Staples Center, discussion in Los Angeles civic circles turned to more down-to-earth matters: Were the pop star's death and memorial a net fiscal loss or gain to the city, and should taxpayers get stuck with the tab? City Atty. Carmen Trutanich said this week that he was investigating how the city ended up with a $1.4-million bill.
BUSINESS
July 7, 2009 | Hugo Martin and Peter Pae
Today's Michael Jackson memorial service at Staples Center may put a strain on city services, but it's turning out to be a shot in the arm for Southern California's slumping tourism industry. Hotels, restaurants, tourist destinations and airlines reported a massive jump over the weekend in business and reservations, and they foresee a continued surge that they hope will jolt the local economy -- at least for a few days.
OPINION
July 7, 2009
Today's public (but not really public) Staples Center memorial service for Michael Jackson, with its vouchers, tickets, wristbands and attempted EBay resales, sums up much of the tackiness and tragedy that accompanies media stardom in the early 21st century. It also says something about Los Angeles and its ambivalence about public space. The problem is not that tickets are required for the program at Staples and the Nokia Theatre.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2009 | By Phil Willon and Maeve Reston
Los Angeles City Councilwoman Jan Perry said Monday that entertainment company AEG probably will not help defray the $3.2-million cost of police and other city services for the Michael Jackson memorial until the city attorney resolves his "criminal investigation" into the spending. "Threats are not conductive to asking people to make a donation," Perry said, referring to the inquiry ordered by City Atty. Carmen Trutanich. Later, she added, "We're faced with the sword hanging over AEG's head.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2009 | By David Zahniser and Phil Willon
After nearly six months of study, the Los Angeles City Council is poised to decide this week whether Anschutz Entertainment Group should help taxpayers cover the public cost of Michael Jackson's downtown memorial ceremony at Staples Center. And if AEG steps forward with a check, it will be the latest move by the Jackson promoter to help the city's elected officials out of a jam. When the council sought voter approval of a $1-billion affordable-housing bond in 2006, AEG and its affiliates contributed $75,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2009 | Phil Willon and Maeve Reston
The Los Angeles City Council on Friday issued a stinging rebuke of City Atty. Carmen Trutanich, voting unanimously to reject his legal advice and back six controversial sign permits at the L.A. Live entertainment district downtown. Trutanich two weeks ago warned building officials, Councilwoman Jan Perry and representatives of L.A. Live's owner, Anschutz Entertainment Group, that they could face prosecution if sign permits for the company's new movie theater were issued, according to Perry and AEG. Trutanich said the large wall signs violated the city's new ban on outdoor ads. During a two-hour council hearing, five members scolded the city attorney for making the threats, although he did not attend the meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2009 | Maeve Reston and Phil Willon
Los Angeles City Atty. Carmen Trutanich on Thursday defended his efforts to recoup city dollars spent on the Michael Jackson memorial, but denied asking the top executive of the company that owns Staples Center to pay $6 million during a meeting in July. A day after AEG President and Chief Executive Tim Leiweke told The Times editorial board that Trutanich tried to "bully" the company into paying for various city services provided during the memorial, Trutanich justified his actions during a speech to members of the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce.
IMAGE
October 4, 2009 | Ellen Olivier
After murdering her children in Euripides' classic "Medea," Annette Bening, with husband Warren Beatty, helped celebrate the launch of UCLA Live's Eighth International Theatre Festival at the play's opening-night party. No matter that the play is nearly 2,500 years old, Claudia Weill said, "the same issues are with us," including "disposability of women." Alan Schwartz, president of the Royce Center Circle, which supports UCLA's performing arts, said that although the university has presented plays for eight years, "Medea" was the first original production to be created by the UCLA Live series.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Jermaine Jackson's rendition of the song "Smile," sung at his brother Michael Jackson's public memorial last month, soon will be available on iTunes. Acting in advance of a hearing Monday at which the singer's posthumous merchandising is expected to be addressed, Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Mitchell Beckloff allowed administrators of Jackson's estate to enter into an agreement Friday with Apple Inc. to distribute the song and video on Apple Inc.'s popular downloading website.
OPINION
July 16, 2009
Re "Mayor says L.A. will pay its Jackson event tab," July 14 I have a hard time understanding Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's decision to pay the estimated $1.4-million cost for police protection, traffic and other services connected with the Michael Jackson memorial service at Staples Center. I always believed public funds for funerals, including traffic management, was strictly for public figures such as a president, governor or mayor. Michael Jackson was a very talented private figure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2009 | Phil Willon
Los Angeles City Atty. Carmen Trutanich on Tuesday said his inquiry into the city's role in providing support for the Michael Jackson memorial may have unearthed some "criminal aspects," although he added that he could not discuss details. Trutanich's assistants are investigating events leading up to the July 7 memorial, including which city officials authorized the deployment of thousands of police officers. The city spent an estimated $1.
OPINION
July 16, 2009
Re "Mayor says L.A. will pay its Jackson event tab," July 14 I have a hard time understanding Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's decision to pay the estimated $1.4-million cost for police protection, traffic and other services connected with the Michael Jackson memorial service at Staples Center. I always believed public funds for funerals, including traffic management, was strictly for public figures such as a president, governor or mayor. Michael Jackson was a very talented private figure.
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