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BUSINESS
April 3, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Harry & David Holdings Inc. said it had agreed to sell its Jackson & Perkins rose business to two groups for $49 million. The Medford, Ore., company, which sells pears and other produce and gifts through catalogs and the Internet, said it decided the rose operation didn't mesh with its main business.
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BUSINESS
March 8, 2012 | By Debbie Arrington
Future generations may never know the beauty of Diana, Princess of Wales; sniff Catalina in the sunshine; or fall for Beloved. For a century, devoted gardeners have appreciated the marvels of delicate and finicky hybrid roses and referred to them by name, like pets or family. The product of generations of breeding, the queen of flowers could act like a spoiled princess because its delicate blooms offered a special reward. In recent years, though, time-strapped homeowners have traded their big teas for compact shrub roses — utilitarian soldiers in the landscape that could cover ground without fuss.
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BUSINESS
March 8, 2012 | By Debbie Arrington
Future generations may never know the beauty of Diana, Princess of Wales; sniff Catalina in the sunshine; or fall for Beloved. For a century, devoted gardeners have appreciated the marvels of delicate and finicky hybrid roses and referred to them by name, like pets or family. The product of generations of breeding, the queen of flowers could act like a spoiled princess because its delicate blooms offered a special reward. In recent years, though, time-strapped homeowners have traded their big teas for compact shrub roses — utilitarian soldiers in the landscape that could cover ground without fuss.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Harry & David Holdings Inc. said it had agreed to sell its Jackson & Perkins rose business to two groups for $49 million. The Medford, Ore., company, which sells pears and other produce and gifts through catalogs and the Internet, said it decided the rose operation didn't mesh with its main business.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2000 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A groundbreaking partnership between the United Farm Workers and an upscale rose producer has increased productivity, cut workers' compensation claims and lifted the morale of hundreds of field workers. Now, it's even yielded a rose. The pink, sweet-smelling floribunda rose, developed by Jackson & Perkins at the suggestion of UFW members, commemorates Our Lady of Guadalupe, revered by millions of Latinos as the patron saint of Mexico. Officials and union members at the Bend, Ore.
MAGAZINE
January 11, 1987 | ROBERT SMAUS, Robert Smaus is an associate editor of Los Angeles Times Magazine.
Early in January, nurseries are filled with roses, some new, some old. Although new roses new are always the star attractions, this year is different. The rose industry was in a bit of disarray last year--two of the largest companies were purchased by others--and for the first time in a while, some of the new roses come from nurseries outside California, the center, nationally, of rose growing.
NEWS
April 1, 1999 | ROBERT SMAUS
Now you can name a rose after a friend or loved one--even your city or company. I don't mean you simply start calling a rose Joe or Jane; you can actually name a new introduction from Jackson & Perkins, one of this country's largest rose producers. You can choose any name that is not already registered for roses. "The only limitation is good taste," according Jackson & Perkins. All you have to do is come up with $75,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1999 | JAMES E. FOWLER
The American tradition of Memorial Day dates back more than 130 years. Originally known as Decoration Day, the holiday initially honored the more than 600,000 Americans who lost their lives in the Civil War. In 1868, May 30 was proclaimed the official holiday in the Northern states, while Southern states honored their fallen heroes April 26. The name Memorial Day was adopted in 1882.
HOME & GARDEN
April 30, 1994 | CYNDI Y. NIGHTENGALE
No bait is needed to lure this "Fish Out of Water," a line of sculptures created for the garden by Herbie Webster of Dana Point. The fish, made of a mild steel, stand on their tails and sport funky fins and gills, bug eyes, teeth and other artsy protrusions. With or without a protective coating to preserve the rust patina, these are sure to bring tall tales and lively conversation to your garden, patio or poolside.
NEWS
May 10, 2001 | JENNIFER LOWE, jennifer.lowe@latimes.com
I'm waiting for some scented geraniums to arrive from the Internet. I hadn't planned on ordering them, but a friend and I fell in love with them on a Web site. We were checking out what the online gardening world had to offer in hopes of making our yards look more like Martha Stewart's.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2000 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A groundbreaking partnership between the United Farm Workers and an upscale rose producer has increased productivity, cut workers' compensation claims and lifted the morale of hundreds of field workers. Now, it's even yielded a rose. The pink, sweet-smelling floribunda rose, developed by Jackson & Perkins at the suggestion of UFW members, commemorates Our Lady of Guadalupe, revered by millions of Latinos as the patron saint of Mexico. Officials and union members at the Bend, Ore.
MAGAZINE
January 11, 1987 | ROBERT SMAUS, Robert Smaus is an associate editor of Los Angeles Times Magazine.
Early in January, nurseries are filled with roses, some new, some old. Although new roses new are always the star attractions, this year is different. The rose industry was in a bit of disarray last year--two of the largest companies were purchased by others--and for the first time in a while, some of the new roses come from nurseries outside California, the center, nationally, of rose growing.
HOME & GARDEN
December 31, 1994 | KAREN DARDICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pasadena's annual parade will be Monday; the other rose parade will in the days after as gardeners descend on nurseries to buy roses in the bare-root stage. In addition to old favorites, there are almost 50 new selections for 1995. They include roses in novel colors and with sweet perfumes, easy care ground covers and shrubs, traditional floribunda and hybrid teas with classic form and long stems for elegant arrangements.
TRAVEL
October 6, 1991 | JUDITH MORGAN
In the southwestern Oregon hub of Medford, whose tidy airport serves the Rogue River Valley, a cabbie was praising the town: close to Crater Lake, the deepest lake in America, he said, and to Oregon's only national park. Fine fishing in mountain streams and in the Rogue River itself. Good hiking. Good skiing. Fresh air. And 19 inches of rainfall a year . . . look at those climber roses! Was the braggart a native? Not at all.
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