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July 21, 1995 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stunning vote of no confidence, the two most important Arkansas financial sponsors of President Clinton's political career--Don Tyson of Tyson Foods Inc. and the powerful Stephens banking family of Little Rock--have turned their backs on the Clinton reelection effort and are supporting Sen. Bob Dole's candidacy. Tyson's political action committee has already contributed $3,000 to Dole's campaign, while the Stephens Inc.
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NEWS
July 21, 1995 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stunning vote of no confidence, the two most important Arkansas financial sponsors of President Clinton's political career--Don Tyson of Tyson Foods Inc. and the powerful Stephens banking family of Little Rock--have turned their backs on the Clinton reelection effort and are supporting Sen. Bob Dole's candidacy. Tyson's political action committee has already contributed $3,000 to Dole's campaign, while the Stephens Inc.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jack Stephens, 81, a financier who built one of the largest investment banking firms off Wall Street and donated millions of dollars to charitable causes, died Saturday at home in Little Rock, Ark., said a spokesman for the firm Stephens Inc. Stephens, along with his brother W.R. "Witt" Stephens, was one of the richest people in Arkansas. He gave generously to charity, including $48 million to a spinal institute in Little Rock. Stephens grew up on a farm near Prattsville, Ark.
SPORTS
April 4, 2006 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
In 1935, accompanied by his mother, 4-year-old William Woodward "Hootie" Johnson attended his first Masters tournament at Augusta National Golf Club. He was not wearing a green jacket. It's all different now -- the tournament, the course, the golf club -- just as anyone would expect with the passing of 71 years. As for Johnson, from his desk in the wood-paneled second-floor office at Augusta National, the seat of power for the most important tournament in golf has never seemed more secure.
NEWS
October 16, 1996 | JIM MANN and GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Over the last four years, the Clinton administration has taken specific steps to provide trade and political benefits to Indonesian President Suharto and his government, in some cases rejecting recommendations or stopping investigations pursued by lower-level U.S. officials. In one instance, the White House interceded after James Riady, scion of a wealthy Indonesian family, came to Washington to arrange meetings between a senior aide to Suharto and top-level officials in the administration.
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