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Jaco Van Dormael

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1992 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The average film buff could name several French, German or British directors, perhaps even one or two from the Netherlands. But press any of them to come up with a single Belgian filmmaker and you might as well be speaking in Flemish. It's like being from everywhere and nowhere, says Jaco Van Dormael, the director of "Toto Le Heros," who like most educated Belgians, speaks fluent French, German, Dutch and English.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1997 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At last year's Cannes Film Festival, the writer and director of "The Eighth Day," Jaco Van Dormael, and his co-stars, Daniel Auteuil and Pascal Duquenne, were greeted with resounding boos at the press screening. Then, days later, they heard what Auteuil estimates as a 15-minute standing ovation for the film at the festival screening. Awards night arrived and Auteuil and Duquenne basked in the glow as co-winners of the best actor awards.
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NEWS
March 3, 1996 | Kenneth Turan
This 1991 Belgian film does all those exhilarating things you've forgotten a movie could do. Nominally the tale of an old man looking back over his life and deciding to do something about it, "Toto" is audacious in its largeness of spirit, the way it attempts to cram absolutely all of existence, the joy as well as the heartbreak, into a mere 90 minutes. Thomas Bouquet, pictured, stars for directer-screenwriter Jaco van Dormael (Bravo Monday at 8 p.m. and Tuesday at 11:30 a.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Eighth Day" is a daring film even for so venturesome a filmmaker as Belgium's Jaco van Dormael, whose 1991 "Toto le Heros" was such a brilliantly original exploration of fate and identity. What's daring is not so much its teaming of major French star Daniel Auteuil and Pascal Duquenne, who in real life has Down's syndrome, but how close it comes to being like a Hollywood buddy movie only to pull back for a stunning pull-the-rug-out-from-under-you climax.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Toto the Hero" isn't faster than a speeding bullet and doesn't even try to leap tall buildings in a single bound. Yet in its quietly delightful way it performs an equally superhuman feat: It restores your belief in movies, in the wonders they can accomplish if only their creators had the nerve and verve to try.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Eighth Day" is a daring film even for so venturesome a filmmaker as Belgium's Jaco van Dormael, whose 1991 "Toto le Heros" was such a brilliantly original exploration of fate and identity. What's daring is not so much its teaming of major French star Daniel Auteuil and Pascal Duquenne, who in real life has Down's syndrome, but how close it comes to being like a Hollywood buddy movie only to pull back for a stunning pull-the-rug-out-from-under-you climax.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Toto the Hero" isn't faster than a speeding bullet and doesn't even try to leap tall buildings in a single bound. Yet in its quietly delightful way it performs an equally superhuman feat: It restores your belief in movies, in the wonders they can accomplish if only their creators had the nerve and verve to try.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1997 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At last year's Cannes Film Festival, the writer and director of "The Eighth Day," Jaco Van Dormael, and his co-stars, Daniel Auteuil and Pascal Duquenne, were greeted with resounding boos at the press screening. Then, days later, they heard what Auteuil estimates as a 15-minute standing ovation for the film at the festival screening. Awards night arrived and Auteuil and Duquenne basked in the glow as co-winners of the best actor awards.
NEWS
March 3, 1996 | Kenneth Turan
This 1991 Belgian film does all those exhilarating things you've forgotten a movie could do. Nominally the tale of an old man looking back over his life and deciding to do something about it, "Toto" is audacious in its largeness of spirit, the way it attempts to cram absolutely all of existence, the joy as well as the heartbreak, into a mere 90 minutes. Thomas Bouquet, pictured, stars for directer-screenwriter Jaco van Dormael (Bravo Monday at 8 p.m. and Tuesday at 11:30 a.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Toto the Hero" isn't faster than a speeding bullet and doesn't even try to leap tall buildings in a single bound. Yet in its quietly delightful way it performs an equally superhuman feat: It restores your belief in movies, in the wonders they can accomplish if only their creators had the nerve and verve to try.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Toto the Hero" isn't faster than a speeding bullet and doesn't even try to leap tall buildings in a single bound. Yet in its quietly delightful way it performs an equally superhuman feat: It restores your belief in movies, in the wonders they can accomplish if only their creators had the nerve and verve to try.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1992 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The average film buff could name several French, German or British directors, perhaps even one or two from the Netherlands. But press any of them to come up with a single Belgian filmmaker and you might as well be speaking in Flemish. It's like being from everywhere and nowhere, says Jaco Van Dormael, the director of "Toto Le Heros," who like most educated Belgians, speaks fluent French, German, Dutch and English.
NEWS
February 5, 1995 | Kenneth Turan
Jaco Van Dormael's superb 1992 French-language film from Belgium restores your belief in movies. Bristling with inventive glee, it is audacious not only in narrative structure but also in largeness of spirit and the way it employs a light touch with life's tragedies. "Toto" is a debut film that attempted to cram the joy and the heartbreak and every one of the ages of man into a mere 90 minutes.
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