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Jacob

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NEWS
May 1, 1992
Have you ever read a story about someone and their story is so moving that it stays with you and you can't forget about it? Your story about Jacob ("A Purpose in Tragedy," Dianne Klein column, March 22) has done that to me. I am the mother of two small boys, and something about Jacob has touched me deeply, and I will never be quite the same. I spoke to Lauren Johnson briefly and didn't know quite what I wanted to tell her. I hope she knows that she and her husband and Jacob are in our prayers and in our thoughts.
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SPORTS
April 5, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
Jacob Amaya, a freshman shortstop-pitcher at Covina Northview, has committed to Cal State Fullerton.   Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
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NATIONAL
May 11, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Emily again topped the list of most popular baby girl names last year, registering as No. 1 for the 12th straight time. Jacob led among names for boys for the ninth year in a row. New parents didn't stray far from past habits in 2007 when naming their babies. Only one name, Elizabeth, is new to the top 10 list, returning after a two-year absence. Samantha, which previously ranked 10th, dropped to No. 12, according to the new list from the Social Security Administration. Besides Jacob, other top picks for boys were Michael, Joshua and Matthew.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Before there was Minimalism there was Post-Minimalism. That might seem hardly feasible if you put your trust in time being an irreversible process. Theoretical physics, however, allows for a more open future in which the concepts of past and present become malleable. With the advent of Minimalism in music 50 years ago, young composers cleaned the slate with basic chords, simple melodic formulas, a beat and, most of all, a salute to repetition. All that was off-limits in the Modernist musical revolution set off a half-century earlier.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2010 | By Eric Banks, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet A Novel David Mitchell Random House: 484 pp., $26 David Mitchell's new work, "The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet," is conventional in more ways than one. Not only is the novel, set in Japan at the end of the 18th century, the least experimental book the British novelist has ever written — in fact, it cleanly passes as "historical fiction" — but with each passing book, he embraces...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1989 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
When one child is unusually talented, less-favored siblings often tread an uphill path to compete. In "Wonderworks' " "Jacob Have I Loved," today at 7 p.m. on Channels 28 and 50 and at 8 p.m. on Channel 15, an angry and unhappy teen sulks in her musically gifted twin's shadow, until finally realizing her own special gifts. In a tiny Chesapeake fishing community, Louise (Bridget Fonda--granddaughter of Henry, daughter of Peter) earns extra money crab-catching to help pay for twin sister Caroline's (Jenny Robertson)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
In "Jacob's Folly," Rebecca Miller has landed on a narrative voice that's antique, droll, racy and occasionally cutting - imagine an 18th century French rake being played by David Niven. But instead of putting an elegant, handsome man behind that voice, Miller has given it to a fly. A common housefly, yes, but more importantly, it's the proverbial fly on the wall. Embodying that metaphor so literally is silly but also brilliant; in a sense this is what writers do, spy on their invented worlds, eavesdrop on their characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2003 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
If, as poet and priest Gerard Manley Hopkins believed, we can infer the existence of God from the appearance of a beautiful flower, perhaps it's also possible to infer the existence of God from a depiction of bodily struggle and pain. French author Jean-Paul Kauffmann wonders, in "The Struggle With the Angel," his quiet and insightful meditation on the human skirmish with divinity, whether we can reconcile the atrocities of the world with a benevolent God.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | By Susan King
Kurtwood Smith turned the image of the sitcom dad on its ear in the raucous Fox sitcom "That '70s Show" as Red Forman, the tough-nosed war vet father of Eric (Topher Grace). Red was the antithesis of such sweater-clad warm-and-fuzzy TV dads as Ozzie Nelson on "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet" and Bill Cosby on "The Cosby Show. " In fact, Red was more Tasmanian devil than teddy bear. He loved his power tools, drinking beer, hunting and fishing. Red was known for his pungent put-downs of his son: "What are you going to put on your resume?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2010 | Steve Lopez
When I knocked on Bob and Linda Nelson's door in Laguna Niguel, their son Matthew took one look at me and figured he knew my line of work. "Dr. Lopez," said the 3-year-old. It was an understandable mistake. Matthew, who had a heart transplant as an infant, has seen his share of physicians. Like Matthew, I had made an assumption that turned out to be incorrect. When I heard that the Nelsons had just adopted their ninth severely disabled child, a 2-year-old named Jacob, I assumed they must be a young couple.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | By Susan King
Kurtwood Smith turned the image of the sitcom dad on its ear in the raucous Fox sitcom "That '70s Show" as Red Forman, the tough-nosed war vet father of Eric (Topher Grace). Red was the antithesis of such sweater-clad warm-and-fuzzy TV dads as Ozzie Nelson on "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet" and Bill Cosby on "The Cosby Show. " In fact, Red was more Tasmanian devil than teddy bear. He loved his power tools, drinking beer, hunting and fishing. Red was known for his pungent put-downs of his son: "What are you going to put on your resume?
BUSINESS
March 26, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
WASHINGTON -- Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew had successful outpatient surgery on Tuesday but remained at a New York area hospital overnight because of a low-grade fever, a Treasury Department spokeswoman said. Lew, 58, underwent the procedure to treat a benign enlarged prostate. The plan was for him to recuperate at his New York home for the rest of this week before returning to his normal schedule. The surgery at an unnamed hospital went well, and Lew was resting comfortably after the procedure, Treasury spokeswoman Natalie Wyeth Earnest said Tuesday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By David Pagel
Jacob Hashimoto's installation at the Museum of Contemporary Art Pacific Design Center is a lot like the weather: all around us and bigger than everyone. Made up of thousands of small paper-and-wood sculptures that resemble miniature kites, Hashimoto's sprawling piece also puts visitors in mind of massive gatherings, whether they're made up of people crowded into stadiums or represented by numbers too big to wrap your head around - like the national debt or the amount of Twitter followers celebrities have.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
If you missed the French series "The Returned" on Sundance Channel last year, or if it was just too opaque/mood-soaked/subtitled (i.e. French) for you, ABC now offers "Resurrection," a brighter if not bolder and certainly faster-paced (i.e. American) version of a world in which the dead begin returning to the ones they left behind. Based on the Jason Mott novel "The Returned," the series opens gorgeously enough with a young boy (Landon Gimenez) waking up in a rice paddy in China.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Mary McNamara
"The Trip to Bountiful. "  There are few roles that allow women of a certain age to display the symphonic skill it takes a lifetime to acquire, and fewer still that exist outside the realm of high-drama one-woman shows. But there is Horton Foote's lovely and lyrical tale of Carrie Watts, a woman obstinately battling the restrictions of age and dependency to return to visit her hometown of Bountiful once more before she dies. Written in 1953 as a teleplay, "The Trip to Bountiful" originally starred Lillian Gish.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
Target Corp.'s head of technology stepped down Wednesday as the company tries to recover from one of the largest data breaches on record at a retailer. Beth Jacob, who served as executive vice president of technology services and chief information officer for Target since 2008, resigned both posts, Chief Executive Gregg Steinhafel said in a statement. "While we are still in the process of an ongoing investigation, we recognize that the information security environment is evolving rapidly," he said.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
Target Corp.'s head of technology stepped down Wednesday as the company attempts to recover from one of the largest data breaches on record at a retailer. Beth Jacob, who served as executive vice president of technology services and chief information officer for Target since 2008, resigned both posts, Chief Executive Gregg Steinhafel said in a statement. "While we are still in the process of an ongoing investigation, we recognize that the information security environment is evolving rapidly," he said.
SPORTS
February 18, 2014 | By Lisa Dillman
SOCHI, Russia -- You can practically imagine Travis Pastrana wishing that U.S. snowboarders Alex Deibold and Trevor Jacob had their wild Olympic finish on his show. Who knows? Maybe they can re-create it on a future episode of “Nitro Circus.” It was fascinating theater on a rain-soaked muddle of a course, a sliding photo finish between Deibold and Jacob in the semifinals of men's snowboard cross on Tuesday morning. Mere inches separated the teammates fighting for the last spot in the final.
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