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Jacob Marley

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2000
The feelings of anger and resentment still harbored against Jane Fonda are not as easily pigeon-holed as Al Martinez would have us believe (July 30). While it is true that several years have passed since she was seen "smiling prettily" at a photo op, the stark reality of what she did during that "climate of protest" has in no way diminished. She was there as a private citizen and not in the capacity of peace negotiator (a la Kissinger). During a time that our country was at war, Fonda chose to consort with the enemy, denounce the U.S. and pose for photographs on weapons of death, all while our men and women were fighting, dying, being tortured and living in inhumane prison (forced labor)
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Scrooge, Tiny Tim, Jacob Marley and the ghosts of Christmas past, present and future: they first appeared in 1843. That was when Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" was first published; in the century and a half since, it's never gone out of print and has been adapted many, many, many times. In the preface, Dickens wrote, "I have endeavoured in this Ghostly little book, to raise the Ghost of an Idea, which shall not put my readers out of humour with themselves, with each other, with the season, or with me. May it haunt their houses pleasantly, and no one wish to lay it. " He always had a way with words.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
Pretty much all there is to say about "Scrooge and Marley" is that it is a gay-themed adaptation of Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" made in Chicago. One can more or less imagine the entire film from there. The Ghost of Christmas Past tours Ben Scrooge (David Pevsner) through being kicked out of the house by his bigoted father on to finding acceptance within the local gay community. After becoming a successful nightclub owner, Scrooge and his partner, Jacob Marley (played as a ghost by "SNL" veteran Tim Kazurinsky)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
Pretty much all there is to say about "Scrooge and Marley" is that it is a gay-themed adaptation of Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" made in Chicago. One can more or less imagine the entire film from there. The Ghost of Christmas Past tours Ben Scrooge (David Pevsner) through being kicked out of the house by his bigoted father on to finding acceptance within the local gay community. After becoming a successful nightclub owner, Scrooge and his partner, Jacob Marley (played as a ghost by "SNL" veteran Tim Kazurinsky)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Scrooge, Tiny Tim, Jacob Marley and the ghosts of Christmas past, present and future: they first appeared in 1843. That was when Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" was first published; in the century and a half since, it's never gone out of print and has been adapted many, many, many times. In the preface, Dickens wrote, "I have endeavoured in this Ghostly little book, to raise the Ghost of an Idea, which shall not put my readers out of humour with themselves, with each other, with the season, or with me. May it haunt their houses pleasantly, and no one wish to lay it. " He always had a way with words.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1992
I am reading Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" for the umpteenth time; one of those little traditions of the season I hold to. For some reason, perhaps due to the sheer quantity of bad news I've been receiving courtesy of the global village--Somalia, Bosnia, India and all--I began to think how much like poor old Jacob Marley we've become. Marley was condemned in death to wander the world and witness human pain and sorrows. There but a specter, Marley could only wail in torment at his helplessness to ease the slightest bit of human suffering.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2012 | By David Ng
Dan Castellaneta, who voices America's favorite schlub hubby Homer Simpson on Fox's "The Simpsons," has joined the cast of Second City's "A Christmas Carol: Twist Your Dickens"  at the Kirk Douglas Theatre. The comedic stage production is set to begin performances on Nov. 24. Castellaneta, a veteran of Second City, will be part of an ensemble cast that includes other recognizable comedy names -- Joe Flaherty, of SCTV fame; Frank Caeti, an alumnus of Fox's "MADTv"; and Larry Joe Campbell, from the ABC sitcom "According to Jim. " The cast also includes Amanda Blake Davis, Brian Stepanek and Jean Villepique.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2008 | David C. Nichols, Nichols is a freelance writer.
With both the recession and holiday season now official, "A Christmas Carol" returns to Celebration Theatre. What a difference a year makes. First seen in 2007, Jason Moyer's newly revised gay take on the immortal Dickens tale improves on itself considerably. It still concerns fashion mogul Ebenezer "Ben" Scrooge, whom returning Michael Taylor Gray plays as Miranda Priestly from "The Devil Wears Prada" possessed by Mr. Burns of "The Simpsons." Since partner Jacob Marley's death, Scrooge has abandoned goodwill, spurning charity solicitors, saying "pshaw!"
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2010 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times television critic
Christmas is a time for television. Sitcoms are dressed with wreaths and trees; dramas, for the space of an episode, get extra-poignant, perhaps by the addition of a homeless person. In animated specials, collected through generations, something bad almost happens to Christmas itself: Santa is sick; he is tied up in a closet; his team lacks a reindeer. A sad little Christmas tree is plumped with love. Frosty hearts melt like marshmallows in the hot chocolate milk of human kindness. As the broadcast majors have grown content mostly to trim ongoing series with seasonal signifiers and bring a few classics down from the attic, the lion's share of new holiday show-making has moved to basic cable, where networks such as Nickelodeon service children the live-long day and Lifetime and the Hallmark Channel keep faith with the TV movie, in a low-budget, reduced-expectations sort of way. Lifetime likes a tabloid thrill, but nothing you see on Hallmark will make you any more anxious than the opening of a Christmas card; predictability, one would say, is part of the deal, and appeal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1999 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jerry Patch's adaptation of Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol," at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa, has had a firm hold on Orange County audiences for two decades--and with good reason. It's well-formed and energetically performed. It's gone through changes over the years. In the early '80s, it was predominantly designed as a kids' show, with pratfalls, gags and lots of laughs, in spite of the fact that the Dickens original is anything but a kids' story.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2012 | By David Ng
Dan Castellaneta, who voices America's favorite schlub hubby Homer Simpson on Fox's "The Simpsons," has joined the cast of Second City's "A Christmas Carol: Twist Your Dickens"  at the Kirk Douglas Theatre. The comedic stage production is set to begin performances on Nov. 24. Castellaneta, a veteran of Second City, will be part of an ensemble cast that includes other recognizable comedy names -- Joe Flaherty, of SCTV fame; Frank Caeti, an alumnus of Fox's "MADTv"; and Larry Joe Campbell, from the ABC sitcom "According to Jim. " The cast also includes Amanda Blake Davis, Brian Stepanek and Jean Villepique.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2010 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times television critic
Christmas is a time for television. Sitcoms are dressed with wreaths and trees; dramas, for the space of an episode, get extra-poignant, perhaps by the addition of a homeless person. In animated specials, collected through generations, something bad almost happens to Christmas itself: Santa is sick; he is tied up in a closet; his team lacks a reindeer. A sad little Christmas tree is plumped with love. Frosty hearts melt like marshmallows in the hot chocolate milk of human kindness. As the broadcast majors have grown content mostly to trim ongoing series with seasonal signifiers and bring a few classics down from the attic, the lion's share of new holiday show-making has moved to basic cable, where networks such as Nickelodeon service children the live-long day and Lifetime and the Hallmark Channel keep faith with the TV movie, in a low-budget, reduced-expectations sort of way. Lifetime likes a tabloid thrill, but nothing you see on Hallmark will make you any more anxious than the opening of a Christmas card; predictability, one would say, is part of the deal, and appeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2008 | David C. Nichols, Nichols is a freelance writer.
With both the recession and holiday season now official, "A Christmas Carol" returns to Celebration Theatre. What a difference a year makes. First seen in 2007, Jason Moyer's newly revised gay take on the immortal Dickens tale improves on itself considerably. It still concerns fashion mogul Ebenezer "Ben" Scrooge, whom returning Michael Taylor Gray plays as Miranda Priestly from "The Devil Wears Prada" possessed by Mr. Burns of "The Simpsons." Since partner Jacob Marley's death, Scrooge has abandoned goodwill, spurning charity solicitors, saying "pshaw!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2000
The feelings of anger and resentment still harbored against Jane Fonda are not as easily pigeon-holed as Al Martinez would have us believe (July 30). While it is true that several years have passed since she was seen "smiling prettily" at a photo op, the stark reality of what she did during that "climate of protest" has in no way diminished. She was there as a private citizen and not in the capacity of peace negotiator (a la Kissinger). During a time that our country was at war, Fonda chose to consort with the enemy, denounce the U.S. and pose for photographs on weapons of death, all while our men and women were fighting, dying, being tortured and living in inhumane prison (forced labor)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1992
I am reading Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" for the umpteenth time; one of those little traditions of the season I hold to. For some reason, perhaps due to the sheer quantity of bad news I've been receiving courtesy of the global village--Somalia, Bosnia, India and all--I began to think how much like poor old Jacob Marley we've become. Marley was condemned in death to wander the world and witness human pain and sorrows. There but a specter, Marley could only wail in torment at his helplessness to ease the slightest bit of human suffering.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The problem with a lot of Scrooges is simple, really. In this season of "A Christmas Carol"s wide and far, you tend to find Scrooges that aren't Scrooges at all; they're just character actors having a little too much fun playing a mean guy. The Charles Dickens character's harshness, loneliness and eventual joyous transformation are conveyed as a series of winks, aimed at an audience all too familiar with the narrative. So it's a very pleasant surprise to see how well Hal Landon Jr.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1993 | JAN HERMAN
Among the many offerings available to Orange County audiences are South Coast Repertory's warm 'A Christmas Carol' and Way Off Broadway's engaging 'Greetings.' South Coast Repertory's 14th annual "A Christmas Carol" glows like a burnished Victorian heirloom--dark around the edges but gleaming within. And Hal Landon Jr., back for his perennial star turn as Scrooge, seems in better form than ever at the heartfelt center of a swiftly paced, atmospheric show full of Dickensian sentiment.
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