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Jacob Neusner

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May 10, 1987
In his review of Paul Johnson's "A History of the Jews" (The Book Review, April 19), Jacob Neusner accuses Johnson of "representing many groups (of Jews) as one and finding a single linear history where there has been none." In so doing, he falls into the erroneous mode of thought of many historians that regards history as a mere chronicle of facts and not as a meaningful narrative which, in the case of the Jews, is derived from a common faith. To write a history of the Jews without acknowledging the psychological imperatives of that faith would be comparable to Neusner writing his own personal history as an account of eating, sleeping, brushing his teeth, and other quotidian happenings while leaving out his purposeful progress from callow student to Judaic scholar.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring victory in his fight to rein in the National Endowment for the Arts, Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Lomita) said on Wednesday that he will offer an amendment to a bill to renew the arts agency that would clamp tight controls over the kinds of art that can legally get federal support.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring victory in his fight to rein in the National Endowment for the Arts, Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Lomita) said on Wednesday that he will offer an amendment to a bill to renew the arts agency that would clamp tight controls over the kinds of art that can legally get federal support.
BOOKS
May 10, 1987
In his review of Paul Johnson's "A History of the Jews" (The Book Review, April 19), Jacob Neusner accuses Johnson of "representing many groups (of Jews) as one and finding a single linear history where there has been none." In so doing, he falls into the erroneous mode of thought of many historians that regards history as a mere chronicle of facts and not as a meaningful narrative which, in the case of the Jews, is derived from a common faith. To write a history of the Jews without acknowledging the psychological imperatives of that faith would be comparable to Neusner writing his own personal history as an account of eating, sleeping, brushing his teeth, and other quotidian happenings while leaving out his purposeful progress from callow student to Judaic scholar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1998
Re "It's Too Soon to Ask Forgiveness," Commentary, March 31: To agree with and add to Jacob Neusner's observations: The primary concern of the grieving families is the devastating emotional pain caused by the deaths of their loved ones. The questions are about all of the broken hopes, dreams and expectations for the future with their loved ones. While it is almost impossible for them (and us) not to ask all those unanswerable questions about why it happened, they must go back to the original problem, that their hearts are broken.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1996
I applaud Rabbi Jacob Neusner ("Firmly Held Beliefs Often Require Judgments," Commentary, July 26) for having the courage and the insight to portray a different angle to the otherwise-resented quests of the Southern Baptists. Neusner clearly understands that Christianity must remain true to itself by seeking to convert everyone, not just Jews. Otherwise the Christian claim to exclusivity would be irrational. Neusner is absolutely correct when he says, "From such a confrontation, the rebirth of informed and well-considered faith must come as the one sure result."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1994 | JOHN DART
The 70-page Jewish quarterly that arrived in mailboxes this week was typically thoughtful. Articles declared, among other things, that spousal abuse is a larger-than-acknowledged Jewish problem, that too many rabbis suffer burnout over conflicting expectations and that two decades of women rabbis has not led to a "feminization" of the synagogue as predicted. But there was also a surprise in the fall issue of Jewish Spectator, edited and published in Calabasas.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER and ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration, responding to conservative pressure Tuesday, denounced NEA funding of "obscene art," reheating a controversy that White House officials had been trying in recent weeks to quiet. "This is a subsidy issue, and we need to speak out against subsidies--by the federal taxpayers--for this kind of art," White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said after Bush met with Republican congressional leaders to discuss several topics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1995
After reading Noa Ben Artzi's eulogy for her grandfather, Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin (Nov 7), whatever problems and worries I had melted away. It brought on a choked-up feeling and tears to my eyes. If only this could be required reading by all children, all over the world, along with other literature to bring forth feelings of love, warmth and compassion. Then perhaps the world might realize Rabin's dream and be at peace. DON FEIN Los Angeles As I watched and listened to the American media reporting on the assassination of Rabin, it became very obvious that their objective was to portray anyone opposing the peace accord as a right-wing fanatic.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1990 | BENJAMIN J. HUBBARD, Hubbard teaches a course on Judaism and Chri s tianity at Cal State Fullerton
The genesis of both these remarkable books was the mutual admiration of the respective authors and their desire to enter into profound interfaith dialogue. The one, a face-to-face encounter between the cardinal archbishop of New York and a Nobel Prize-winning Holocaust survivor, touches on contemporary concerns between Jews and Catholics. It can be read in one sitting--and you will feel the warmth and emotion of the participants as if you were in the room with them. The other is a series of letter-like essays about the Bible between a priest-sociologist-novelist and a rabbi-Talmudist-religious historian.
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