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Jacob Zuma

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WORLD
May 10, 2009 | Robyn Dixon
The whistle has blown, the time has come! We're taking Jacob Zuma to the Union Buildings. -- As rays of sunshine broke through after the morning's stormy downpour, the dignitaries at Jacob Zuma's inauguration Saturday in Pretoria leaped to their feet, danced, cheered and ululated as he was sworn in as the president of South Africa. At the top of their lungs, they sang about Zuma's ascent to the Union Buildings, South Africa's presidential residence and seat of government.
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OPINION
April 27, 2014 | By Mark Gevisser
In South Africa today, as the country celebrates the 20th anniversary of its democracy and prepares for elections, two deeply flawed folk heroes - one venal, the other violent - have commandeered the headlines. The president, Jacob Zuma, was recently found by the Public Protector, an independent constitutional body, to have misappropriated $20 million to upgrade his private home. And Oscar Pistorius, a double amputee who awed the world with his speed running on prosthetic legs, is being tried for murder in the killing of his girlfriend.
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WORLD
April 20, 2009 | Robyn Dixon
Nelson Mandela's hobbling steps up to the stage at an African National Congress election rally Sunday were painfully slow, but they were a powerful political boost to president-in-waiting Jacob Zuma. The crowd at the ruling ANC's final rally before general elections Wednesday was ecstatic when Mandela -- known here as Madiba -- made an unannounced visit, circling the Ellis Park Stadium in Johannesburg on a golf cart with Zuma at his side.
OPINION
December 6, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Nelson Mandela was one of the towering figures of the 20th century. Like Martin Luther King Jr. and Mohandas K. Gandhi, he was revered around the globe for his vision and courage, and for the enormous personal sacrifices he made to right the wrongs that plagued his country. His half-century battle against apartheid - the system under which millions of South African blacks were governed by the country's white minority - included 27 years behind bars. But he clung to his principles as well as his dignity, and emerged from Victor Verster Prison in 1990, it seemed, without rancor or bitterness.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2012 | By David Ng
An artist in South Africa has landed in hot water over a painting depicting the country's president, Jacob Zuma, with exposed genitalia. "The Spear," a painting by Brett Murray, shows a clothed Zuma standing in a defiant pose, with his penis and scrotum clearly visible. Since there is no literal spear shown in the painting, viewers can assume that the title is a phallic reference. Zuma is launching a court case this week in which he argues that the painting violates his right to dignity, according to reports.
WORLD
May 11, 2009 | Robyn Dixon
South Africa's new president named his Cabinet on Sunday, moving the widely respected finance minister to a new position that will still give him a role steering the economy on a course intended to reassure international investors. The decision to shift Trevor Manuel, who had become the emblem of South Africa's impressive economic performance over the last 13 years, was a delicate matter for President Jacob Zuma.
WORLD
February 5, 2009 | Robyn Dixon
South Africa's high court on Wednesday set an August trial date for Jacob Zuma, leader of the nation's ruling party -- meaning the country may see its next president tried while in office on charges of graft, fraud and corruption. Despite the charges, the dominant African National Congress is sticking with Zuma as its candidate, making it all but certain he'll be the country's president after elections, expected to be held in April.
WORLD
December 20, 2007 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
When 44 million South Africans woke up Wednesday to news that a few thousand ruling party delegates had chosen the country's likely next president, some were exultant and others were positively alarmed. But to many, Jacob Zuma remains an enigma. Zuma has a reputation for offering vague populist slogans in place of substantive policies and for ducking reporters' questions with a diplomatic smile.
WORLD
December 17, 2007 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
South African President Thabo Mbeki received a stinging rebuff Sunday from supporters of his bitter rival, Jacob Zuma, in the lead-up to a crucial leadership vote at the national conference of the ruling African National Congress. Moments after Mbeki's speech, his last chance to win over support, thousands of delegates signaled their disapproval by standing up and singing Zuma's trademark song, "Umshini Wami," which loosely translates as "Bring Me My Machine (Gun)."
WORLD
December 29, 2007 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
Jacob Zuma, who swept to victory last week as leader of South Africa's ruling African National Congress party, was charged with corruption Friday, in a setback that could thwart his ambitions to rule the country. The populist Zuma trounced South African President Thabo Mbeki in the ANC leadership contest even though the corruption case against him has been dragging on for years. Officials of the National Prosecuting Authority announced last week that they had sufficient evidence to charge Zuma.
WORLD
July 11, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Nelson Mandela's king is a colorful figure. Perhaps a little too colorful. Buyelekhaya Dalindyebo's greatest claim to fame is that he counts South Africa's first black president among his subjects. But the king of Mandela's AbaThembu clan made local headlines Thursday with a string of invective against South Africa's current leader, Jacob Zuma, so blunt that members of his own entourage reportedly gasped. Dalindyebo lashed out at Zuma as he delivered a letter to the president's Pretoria office Wednesday.
WORLD
December 27, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG-- South Africa's often controversial president, Jacob Zuma, emboldened after being strongly voted in for a second term as president this month, told black South Africans they should never try to behave like whites. Buying a pet dog is part of "white culture," said Zuma, a staunch traditionalist, wading into South Africa's often tense debate on race in his first speech after being reelected by the African National Congress. So are taking dogs for walks and spending money on veterinarians when the animals are sick, he said Wednesday in a speech in Impendle, in KwaZulu-Natal, according to a report in the Star newspaper.
WORLD
December 18, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
BLOEMFONTEIN, South Africa - President Jacob Zuma, who has come under criticism as an ineffective leader of South Africa, was reelected Tuesday for a second term as head of the ruling African National Congress. After the party conference vote, Zuma, a controversial figure who has faced numerous scandals, including the use of public money for renovations to his house and corruption charges that were inexplicably dropped in 2009, called for unity and belted out a song. Delegates clad in made-in-China ANC outfits sang, danced, stomped and videorecorded one another with their cellphones.
WORLD
December 16, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
BLOEMFONTEIN, South Africa - Defending his government's record and calling for an end to corruption, South African President Jacob Zuma addressed the opening session of the ruling African National Congress' national conference, at which he expected to comfortably be returned to party leadership. Zuma faces competition from Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe for the leadership post, which essentially determines who will be the South African president after elections in 2014. But he appeared confident of maintaining power Sunday, as the hall erupted with deafening cheers and battle songs during his appearance.
WORLD
December 2, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Political analyst Mark Gevisser described South African President Jacob Zuma's term in one word: "Disastrous. " He's "the worst leader the ANC has ever had. He's a lost cause. He merely fights to save his own skin and to stay out of jail," another analyst, Justice Malala, wrote in October. The South African president is under such vitriolic attack within and without his African National Congress party that the Communist Party in his home province called for a law to protect his "dignity" and restrain his critics.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2012 | By David Ng
An artist in South Africa has landed in hot water over a painting depicting the country's president, Jacob Zuma, with exposed genitalia. "The Spear," a painting by Brett Murray, shows a clothed Zuma standing in a defiant pose, with his penis and scrotum clearly visible. Since there is no literal spear shown in the painting, viewers can assume that the title is a phallic reference. Zuma is launching a court case this week in which he argues that the painting violates his right to dignity, according to reports.
WORLD
December 16, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
BLOEMFONTEIN, South Africa - Defending his government's record and calling for an end to corruption, South African President Jacob Zuma addressed the opening session of the ruling African National Congress' national conference, at which he expected to comfortably be returned to party leadership. Zuma faces competition from Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe for the leadership post, which essentially determines who will be the South African president after elections in 2014. But he appeared confident of maintaining power Sunday, as the hall erupted with deafening cheers and battle songs during his appearance.
WORLD
December 16, 2007 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
When the man who would be South Africa's next president appeared on the front page of a national daily wearing a black cowboy hat with a red hammer and sickle, it did not signal any headline-grabbing shift to communism. But it did raise the question, who is Jacob Zuma?
WORLD
May 31, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Moammar Kadafi has no intention of leaving Libya, South African President Jacob Zuma's office said Tuesday after Zuma met with the Libyan leader in Tripoli. During their session together on Monday, Kadafi stressed "that he was not prepared to leave his country, despite the difficulties," Zuma's office said in a statement. The South African leader also said that Kadafi's "personal safety … is of concern" as NATO-led bombings of Tripoli continue. Kadafi expressed his anger at the NATO bombings, said Zuma, who was taken on a tour of the bomb damage.
WORLD
May 30, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Moammar Kadafi faces stepped-up bombardments and the threat of strikes by attack helicopters but seems determined to maintain his grip on power, in part by rallying a diminished roster of allies to counter his regime's isolation. South African President Jacob Zuma was expected to arrive in Tripoli, the Libyan capital, on Monday in search of a resolution for the 3-month-old conflict, although there is no indication that Kadafi is willing to relinquish power as demanded by rebels, Western governments and even longtime allies Russia and Turkey.
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