Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJacobellis
IN THE NEWS

Jacobellis

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
January 27, 2008 | Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writer
ASPEN, Colo. -- This time for Lindsey Jacobellis, there was no late mishap and settling for silver. She led Saturday's snowboard X competition wire to wire, and at the news conference afterward was asked whether she felt she had earned redemption. Jacobellis sighed because the focus, predictably, had diverted so quickly away from her triumph to her crash last year just before the finish line, when she had to settle for silver.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
February 16, 2014 | By Lisa Dillman
SOCHI, Russia - It wasn't the hint of danger from the challenging snowboard cross course that got into the head of Lindsey Jacobellis. From Turin to Vancouver to Sochi, the problem could be something else for arguably the best rider never to win gold. Jacobellis was far out in front in the semifinals of the women's snowboard cross event at Rosa Khutor Extreme Park. She crashed about three-quarters of the way down the course despite a tenacious effort to hold on. "I thought I was going to be able to pull it off, and as soon as I hit that snow, it just slows you down so quickly," Jacobellis said.
Advertisement
SPORTS
February 12, 2010 | By Lisa Dillman
It was, unfortunately, all about the method. Method acting? Not exactly. But there was a method behind Lindsey Jacobellis' decision to method grab on the second-to-last jump of the snowboard cross course at the Winter Olympics four years ago. With the gold medal thisclose, she fell, but nevertheless had the presence to gather herself, get up and make the podium, winning a silver medal at Turin, Italy. The ensuing, and fierce, reaction was an interesting case study.
SPORTS
February 17, 2010 | By Lisa Dillman
The Gaffe. And now . . . the Gate. Lindsey Jacobellis and the Olympic gold medal apparently are not destined to go hand in hand. On Tuesday, Jacobellis, of Stratton, Vt., failed to reach the women's snowboard cross final, going off the course in the semifinal round, nicking a course gate. There was some tight jockeying on the upper part of the course with eventual gold medalist Maelle Ricker of Canada. Jacobellis came off the first jump and landed off balance, desperately trying to regain her line but ending up in contact with the gate, an automatic disqualification.
SPORTS
January 25, 2009 | Pete Thomas
Mother Nature chose a rotten time to deliver to the Rockies a much-needed dumping: the busiest day of Winter X Games 13. And she delivered the worst kind of snow on an unseasonably balmy Saturday: wet and lumpy, mixed with rain, making fans sponge-like and causing generally fearless extreme athletes to worry about getting down Buttermilk Mountain safely. Conditions were hazardous to poor, and weather was at least partially responsible for sending two competitors to Aspen Valley Hospital.
SPORTS
February 17, 2006
Lindsey Jacobellis, a seven-time World Cup event winner, is favored to win the gold. Other threats for the top prize include Karine Ruby and Julie Pomagalski of France, and Dominique Maltais and Maelle Ricker of Canada.
SPORTS
February 17, 2010 | By Lisa Dillman
The Gaffe. And now . . . the Gate. Lindsey Jacobellis and the Olympic gold medal apparently are not destined to go hand in hand. On Tuesday, Jacobellis, of Stratton, Vt., failed to reach the women's snowboard cross final, going off the course in the semifinal round, nicking a course gate. There was some tight jockeying on the upper part of the course with eventual gold medalist Maelle Ricker of Canada. Jacobellis came off the first jump and landed off balance, desperately trying to regain her line but ending up in contact with the gate, an automatic disqualification.
SPORTS
January 28, 2007 | Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writer
This time, there was no hot-dogging with a lead close to the finish line. But the choice condiment nonetheless flew off for Lindsey Jacobellis. Again, from a jump situated tantalizingly close to the end of a tricky Snowboarder X course. Whoa! Splat! Again, for the snowboarder from Stratton, Vt., a gold medal faded to silver. And once again, more obvious questions from a piqued media, such as, "Was the blunder at Bardonecchia on your mind as you approached that jump?"
SPORTS
February 16, 2010 | By Lisa Dillman
Method grab? Four years ago, it wasn't exactly part of ordinary sports lingo and sounded more like a way to grab a guitar before smashing it onstage. Or something like that. Then came Lindsey Jacobellis and her famous miscue on the second-to-last jump in the women's snowboard cross final at the Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy. It got her the silver medal and cost her gold. Of course, she didn't invent the phrase but merely put it in the public's general frame of reference.
SPORTS
February 17, 2010 | Bill Plaschke
The skid occurred at the top of the hill. The marks were left at the bottom. Lindsey Jacobellis' ride for Olympic redemption slid off the Cypress Mountain course in the first turn of the snowboard cross semifinals Tuesday, but she still grabbed the last word. The last two words, actually. Take that. Remember how four years ago in Turin, Italy, Jacobellis blew a gold medal when she attempted a trick on her final jump, eating snow and finishing second? Remember how she was criticized for putting snowboard style ahead of gold-medal substance?
SPORTS
February 17, 2010 | Bill Plaschke
The skid occurred at the top of the hill. The marks were left at the bottom. Lindsey Jacobellis' ride for Olympic redemption slid off the Cypress Mountain course in the first turn of the snowboard cross semifinals Tuesday, but she still grabbed the last word. The last two words, actually. Take that. Remember how four years ago in Turin, Italy, Jacobellis blew a gold medal when she attempted a trick on her final jump, eating snow and finishing second? Remember how she was criticized for putting snowboard style ahead of gold-medal substance?
SPORTS
February 16, 2010 | By Lisa Dillman
Method grab? Four years ago, it wasn't exactly part of ordinary sports lingo and sounded more like a way to grab a guitar before smashing it onstage. Or something like that. Then came Lindsey Jacobellis and her famous miscue on the second-to-last jump in the women's snowboard cross final at the Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy. It got her the silver medal and cost her gold. Of course, she didn't invent the phrase but merely put it in the public's general frame of reference.
SPORTS
February 12, 2010 | By Lisa Dillman
It was, unfortunately, all about the method. Method acting? Not exactly. But there was a method behind Lindsey Jacobellis' decision to method grab on the second-to-last jump of the snowboard cross course at the Winter Olympics four years ago. With the gold medal thisclose, she fell, but nevertheless had the presence to gather herself, get up and make the podium, winning a silver medal at Turin, Italy. The ensuing, and fierce, reaction was an interesting case study.
SPORTS
January 25, 2009 | Pete Thomas
Mother Nature chose a rotten time to deliver to the Rockies a much-needed dumping: the busiest day of Winter X Games 13. And she delivered the worst kind of snow on an unseasonably balmy Saturday: wet and lumpy, mixed with rain, making fans sponge-like and causing generally fearless extreme athletes to worry about getting down Buttermilk Mountain safely. Conditions were hazardous to poor, and weather was at least partially responsible for sending two competitors to Aspen Valley Hospital.
SPORTS
January 27, 2008 | Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writer
ASPEN, Colo. -- This time for Lindsey Jacobellis, there was no late mishap and settling for silver. She led Saturday's snowboard X competition wire to wire, and at the news conference afterward was asked whether she felt she had earned redemption. Jacobellis sighed because the focus, predictably, had diverted so quickly away from her triumph to her crash last year just before the finish line, when she had to settle for silver.
SPORTS
January 28, 2007 | Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writer
This time, there was no hot-dogging with a lead close to the finish line. But the choice condiment nonetheless flew off for Lindsey Jacobellis. Again, from a jump situated tantalizingly close to the end of a tricky Snowboarder X course. Whoa! Splat! Again, for the snowboarder from Stratton, Vt., a gold medal faded to silver. And once again, more obvious questions from a piqued media, such as, "Was the blunder at Bardonecchia on your mind as you approached that jump?"
NEWS
March 7, 1992 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three young men were found dead early Friday, apparently asphyxiated after inhaling nitrous oxide--so-called laughing gas--emitted from an 80-pound canister they held across their laps in the sealed cab of a pickup truck. Los Angeles police called the deaths accidental and said the victims died after the canister's valve was left open inside the truck, parked with its windows up on Topanga Canyon Boulevard in Chatsworth.
SPORTS
February 16, 2014 | By Lisa Dillman
SOCHI, Russia - It wasn't the hint of danger from the challenging snowboard cross course that got into the head of Lindsey Jacobellis. From Turin to Vancouver to Sochi, the problem could be something else for arguably the best rider never to win gold. Jacobellis was far out in front in the semifinals of the women's snowboard cross event at Rosa Khutor Extreme Park. She crashed about three-quarters of the way down the course despite a tenacious effort to hold on. "I thought I was going to be able to pull it off, and as soon as I hit that snow, it just slows you down so quickly," Jacobellis said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|