Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJacobo Timerman
IN THE NEWS

Jacobo Timerman

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 12, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jacobo Timerman, an Argentine author who wrote about his experiences of torture and abuse as a political prisoner during his country's "dirty war" in the 1981 book "Prisoner Without a Name, Cell Without a Number," died Thursday. He was 76. The writer, who had suffered a heart attack earlier this year, died in his downtown Buenos Aires apartment, said his son, Hector.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 12, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jacobo Timerman, an Argentine author who wrote about his experiences of torture and abuse as a political prisoner during his country's "dirty war" in the 1981 book "Prisoner Without a Name, Cell Without a Number," died Thursday. He was 76. The writer, who had suffered a heart attack earlier this year, died in his downtown Buenos Aires apartment, said his son, Hector.
Advertisement
BOOKS
December 20, 1987 | Richard Eder
Someone whose fingernails have been torn out can use his hands only with vehemence; only with gentleness. Jacobo Timerman, the Argentine editor who was abducted under the dictatorship, held incognito and tortured, has been, ever since, one of the most piercing voices raised against the state brutalities of our times. He is dramatic, graphic and concrete; his writing is memorable in its ability to convey passion and wit in terms of everyday incongruities. Timerman's style is extreme.
NEWS
May 8, 1988 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
Shortly before authorities whisked him from a jail here Saturday, retired Argentine Gen. Carlos Suarez Mason admitted ordering the arrest of celebrated Argentine newspaper publisher Jacobo Timerman, according to an attorney who interviewed him. In a deposition, Suarez Mason discussed his role in the 1970s Argentine military government for the first time since his arrest last year, admitting writing orders that set forth the campaign to quell internal dissent. U.S.
NEWS
January 30, 1988 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
Running for President has not been good for Michael S. Dukakis' free throw. The 5-foot, 8-inch one-time starting guard on the 1951 Brookline High School basketball team dribbled at the foul line and whirled on his black wing tips, but sank only one basket in 10 shots at the St. Ambrose College gymnasium here Friday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1985 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Carlos Gardel sang better than ever Monday, and Argentina paused, with nostalgic smiles and fresh tears, to honor his memory. "Who is Carlos Gardel?" may sound like a trivia game question, but for uncounted millions of Latin Americans, the answer is obvious in half-century-old recordings aired daily from Ushuaia, Argentina, to Queens, N.Y.
NEWS
December 3, 1986 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
An Argentine federal court convicted two army generals and three provincial policemen of massive human rights violations Tuesday in a new chapter of Argentina's drive to impose justice for the bloody deeds in its past. Based on the overwhelming testimony of survivors who told of torture and murder in clandestine detention centers under military control, a six-judge court sentenced retired army Gen. Ramon J.
NEWS
May 8, 1988 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
Shortly before authorities whisked him from a jail here Saturday, retired Argentine Gen. Carlos Suarez Mason admitted ordering the arrest of celebrated Argentine newspaper publisher Jacobo Timerman, according to an attorney who interviewed him. In a deposition, Suarez Mason discussed his role in the 1970s Argentine military government for the first time since his arrest last year, admitting writing orders that set forth the campaign to quell internal dissent. U.S.
BOOKS
December 20, 1987 | Richard Eder
Someone whose fingernails have been torn out can use his hands only with vehemence; only with gentleness. Jacobo Timerman, the Argentine editor who was abducted under the dictatorship, held incognito and tortured, has been, ever since, one of the most piercing voices raised against the state brutalities of our times. He is dramatic, graphic and concrete; his writing is memorable in its ability to convey passion and wit in terms of everyday incongruities. Timerman's style is extreme.
NEWS
November 29, 1987 | RANDALL HACKLEY, Associated Press
Item: A synagogue is bombed hours after the arrest of an alleged Nazi war criminal. Item: The bodies of two Jewish businessmen kidnaped for ransom by rogue federal police officers are found buried in a grove outside Buenos Aires. Since assuming power four years ago from a rightist military regime, the civilian government of President Raul Alfonsin has tried to overcome Argentina's reputation as a haven for Nazis and home of anti-Semites.
BOOKS
July 19, 1987 | James Kaufmann, Kaufmann is co-author of a forthcoming history of the University of Iowa
John Weisman's "Blood Cries" is a moral-political debate in novel's clothing. Sure, it is partly a novel of adventure, delves at moderate depth into journalistic ethics, and has an equitable share of romance. But in its heart, it addresses one large and complex question: What kind of nation is Israel?
Los Angeles Times Articles
|