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Jacobo Zabludovsky

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NEWS
January 20, 1998 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For three decades, he was the trusted face of a one-party system--a television anchorman who was part Walter Cronkite, part government propagandist. On Monday, Jacobo Zabludovsky, 69, Mexico's veteran TV news director, finally stepped down in what many called the end of an era for the country's media. "Mexico has changed. It's a different country," he said in an interview hours before his last broadcast.
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NEWS
January 20, 1998 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For three decades, he was the trusted face of a one-party system--a television anchorman who was part Walter Cronkite, part government propagandist. On Monday, Jacobo Zabludovsky, 69, Mexico's veteran TV news director, finally stepped down in what many called the end of an era for the country's media. "Mexico has changed. It's a different country," he said in an interview hours before his last broadcast.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1988 | VICTOR VALLE, Times Staff Writer
The Galavision cable network today becomes the first Spanish-language TV programmer to offer a 24-hour news format as it switches from a pay-TV channel to a basic, advertising-supported operation. Produced in Mexico City by the Televisa network, the weekday news service called ECO will feature 10 of Televisa's most famous and often controversial journalists--such as Jacobo Zabludovsky, his son Abraham, Ricardo Rocha and Lolita Ayala--who will daily anchor a pair of hourlong segments.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Federal Communications Commission voted 2-1 Thursday to levy the first fine--the maximum of $2,000--for violation of its new decency standards on a Missouri television station that aired a film featuring partial nudity during prime time. In May, 1987, KZKC-TV broadcast "Private Lessons" at 8 p.m., a time that the FCC has determined children are likely to be in the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1987 | VICTOR VALLE, Times Staff Writer
Univision, formerly the Spanish International Network (SIN), announced this week that it will launch the West Coast's first nationally broadcast Spanish-language weeknight news program on Jan. 19. The program will be produced here at the KMEX-TV Channel 34 studios. The 50-minute newscast, to be seen at 11 p.m., will be produced by Univision's recently formed sister company, ECO (Empresa de Comunicaciones Orbitales).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1986 | FRANK del OLMO, Frank del Olmo is a Times editorial writer.
Earlier this year, when the federal government moved to break up the nation's premier Spanish-language television network, Latinos cried foul, claiming that 18 million Latinos would be deprived of a unique and valuable community resource. I wasn't convinced. Now some recent actions by its owners and executives are supporting my doubts that the Spanish International Network will vanish from U.S. screens, or even change very much from what it is now.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1986 | VICTOR VALLE, Times Staff Writer
Reports that Jacobo Zabludovsky, Mexico's elder statesman of TV news, will join the staff of the only nationally broadcast Spanish-language news program in the United States has angered some viewers and provoked threats of resignation from the show's news staff.
BUSINESS
July 4, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Mexico's publishers and editors gathered last month to hear presentations from the nine presidential candidates, veteran news anchor Jacobo Zabludovsky was seated in a place of honor that befits the man who for two decades has been the news voice of media giant Televisa. But that catbird seat became a hot seat when third-place candidate Cuauhtemoc Cardenas rose to speak.
OPINION
December 28, 1997 | Sam Quinones, Sam Quinones, journalist, was recently selected as an Alicia Patterson fellow for 1998
A lot has been made of Mexico's political changes as it breaks from the cocoon that 68 years of one-party rule had spun. Less obvious, but just as profound, has been a monumental transformation of the Mexican media, once ossified but now rejuvenated by the country's new civic effervescence. The passings of two highly influential men in Mexico's media serve to underscore the dramatic changes underway.
OPINION
June 13, 1999 | Richard Rodriguez, Richard Rodriquez, an editor at Pacific News Service, is the author of "Days of Obligation."
In the Americas, few countries are as expert in the business of magic as Mexico. Romance, illusion, cocaine--fantasy is Mexico's growing export, more important than burritos or the eager hands of its migrant workers. Last week's midday assassination of Francisco "Paco" Stanley, Mexico's beloved comic and game-show host, forced millions of Mexicans to recognize reality: Mexico has become a violent, criminal society. Over and over, Stanley's bullet-ridden minivan was shown on TV.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1998 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin Americans devoured the World Cup soccer tournament this summer, watching hours a day of previews, matches and post-game analyses. For Mexico's two broadcast networks, the Cup became another battleground in the war for dominance over the vast Spanish-language television market. Azteca, the brash 5-year-old network, claimed a narrow but critical edge in the contest for more than $100 million in Cup-related TV advertising revenues in Mexico.
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