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Jacqueline A Connor

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Jacqueline A. Connor, who presided over the first trial of accused Rampart Division police officers, is neither fazed by nor unfamiliar with the harsh glare of the spotlight that seems to visit so many L.A. courtrooms. The 48-year-old judge was one of the first assigned to the court's so-called long-cause program--which handles the city's highest-profile cases on the 9th floor of the Criminal Courts Building.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Jacqueline A. Connor, who presided over the first trial of accused Rampart Division police officers, is neither fazed by nor unfamiliar with the harsh glare of the spotlight that seems to visit so many L.A. courtrooms. The 48-year-old judge was one of the first assigned to the court's so-called long-cause program--which handles the city's highest-profile cases on the 9th floor of the Criminal Courts Building.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In March 1997, long before the Rampart scandal unfolded, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Jacqueline A. Connor praised its central figure, corrupt-cop-turned-informant Rafael Perez, for his "clear" and "professional" testimony during a kidnapping trial in her courtroom. Perez was, Connor wrote in a letter of commendation, an example of "the best that law enforcement offers its community."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In March 1997, long before the Rampart scandal unfolded, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Jacqueline A. Connor praised its central figure, corrupt-cop-turned-informant Rafael Perez, for his "clear" and "professional" testimony during a kidnapping trial in her courtroom. Perez was, Connor wrote in a letter of commendation, an example of "the best that law enforcement offers its community."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1997
Rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg pleaded guilty Friday to being an ex-felon in possession of a handgun, accepting a plea bargain to serve three years' probation and perform community service, prosecutors said. The entertainer, whose real name is Calvin Broadus, entered the plea before Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Jacqueline A. Connor. The charges stemmed from a July 21, 1993, traffic stop in which police found a weapon in a car Broadus was traveling in.
NEWS
December 7, 1986
North Hollywood pilot Robert Alexander Quarterman has been banned from flying for six months for performing low-altitude aerobatics over the San Fernando Valley last month. Quarterman, 25, who pleaded no contest to careless and reckless flying, also was fined $1,275 by Municipal Judge Jacqueline A. Connor. Quarterman was cited by Los Angeles police on Nov. 25 after he landed his rented single-engine plane at Van Nuys Airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2000
The Times' Oct. 8 article regarding an off-the-cuff comment made by Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Jacqueline A. Connor during an awards ceremony honoring her four months ago took an unwarranted swipe at a fine judicial officer. Her remark was made in an open forum and, in my opinion, accepted by those in attendance as not inappropriate under the circumstances. No one, including the prosecutors and the defense attorneys in the pending Rampart case, has suggested that she be removed from the case.
OPINION
June 10, 2001
Re "More Judges Answering Call for Jury Duty," June 3: Los Angeles Superior Court Presiding Judge James A. Bascue and Superior Court Judge Jacqueline A. Connor believe that judges should be treated like other citizens and serve jury duty. Let me suggest that we take this learning opportunity one step further. Every day, thousands of those employed in Los Angeles County courthouses must undergo an unnecessary and degrading weapons screening as they enter their workplace. This mandate applies to the judges' own clerks and court reporters, as well as to the district attorneys and public defenders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1995
A man sentenced to death Friday for the murder of a Maywood police officer and a Van Nuys grocery store clerk said he should be executed for his crimes. "I deserve it," Edgardo Sanchez Fuentes, 24, told Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Jacqueline A. Connor. Connor sentenced Fuentes' co-defendants, Benjamin Navarro, also known as Hector Reyna, 24, and Jose Contreras, 22, to life prison terms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1986
Robert Alexander Quarterman had his wings clipped Friday by a Los Angeles Municipal Court judge who directed the North Hollywood pilot to abstain from flying for six months for performing low-altitude aerobatics over the San Fernando Valley last month. Quarterman, 25, who pleaded no contest to one count of careless and reckless flying, also was fined $1,275 by Municipal Court Judge Jacqueline A. Connor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1994
A Los Angeles Superior Court jury Monday recommended the death penalty for Edgardo Sanchez Fuentes, the convicted triggerman in the fatal shootings of a Maywood police officer and a Van Nuys grocer during a 1992 crime spree. But the same jury reached no decision on the fates of Sanchez's companions, Benjamin Alberto Navarro and Jose Contreras, who also were convicted of the murders and a number of armed robberies. Sanchez, 23, is scheduled to be sentenced Dec.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1992 | AMY PYLE
Bail was set at $1 million Thursday for an Encino attorney charged with murder for allegedly masterminding a staged wreck that killed one of the participants on the Golden State Freeway. Gary P. Miller, 44, whose law office is near Beverly Hills, was arrested at the end of October and included in a grand jury indictment involving 30 defendants. He had been held since then without bail.
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