Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJacqueline Barton
IN THE NEWS

Jacqueline Barton

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 29, 1997 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Jacqueline Barton is on intimate terms with DNA, the master molecule of life. She knows its secret crevices, weird loops, strange digressions and switchbacks. When she talks about DNA, her hands trace its imaginary contours, lovingly, like a sculpture. They slice through the air, showing how the "steps" in the DNA ladder stack up on each other like a pile of coins. She pokes at a huge plastic DNA model in her office to show how it jiggles, probes it like a doctor palpating a patient.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Jacqueline K. Barton, a Caltech chemistry professor who has pushed the boundaries of DNA research, has been awarded the National Medal of Science, becoming the first woman at the Pasadena campus to receive what is considered the U.S. government's highest honor to scientists, officials announced Tuesday. Barton was one of seven recipients of this year's medal, a prize that her husband, Peter Dervan, also a Caltech chemist, won in 2006. Administrators of the prize, which was first awarded in 1962, said they were not aware of any other husband and wife who had both received it. The White House cited Barton for the discovery of a new property of the DNA helix and experiments on long-range electron transfers.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Jacqueline K. Barton, a Caltech chemistry professor who has pushed the boundaries of DNA research, has been awarded the National Medal of Science, becoming the first woman at the Pasadena campus to receive what is considered the U.S. government's highest honor to scientists, officials announced Tuesday. Barton was one of seven recipients of this year's medal, a prize that her husband, Peter Dervan, also a Caltech chemist, won in 2006. Administrators of the prize, which was first awarded in 1962, said they were not aware of any other husband and wife who had both received it. The White House cited Barton for the discovery of a new property of the DNA helix and experiments on long-range electron transfers.
NEWS
December 29, 1997 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Jacqueline Barton is on intimate terms with DNA, the master molecule of life. She knows its secret crevices, weird loops, strange digressions and switchbacks. When she talks about DNA, her hands trace its imaginary contours, lovingly, like a sculpture. They slice through the air, showing how the "steps" in the DNA ladder stack up on each other like a pile of coins. She pokes at a huge plastic DNA model in her office to show how it jiggles, probes it like a doctor palpating a patient.
NEWS
October 17, 1991
Jacqueline K. Barton, a Caltech professor of chemistry, has been awarded the 1992 Garvan Medal, recognizing distinguished service to chemistry by women chemists. Barton is a bioinorganic chemist who studies the chemistry gene expression, DNA and metal complexes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1993
A 14-year-old girl who had been in critical condition since being hit by a car while bicycling last week died Wednesday, police said. On June 23, Jacqueline R. Barton of Cypress was riding on Orangewood Avenue when she was struck as she tried to turn left onto Newland Street. Paramedics from the Orange County Fire Department airlifted the unconscious girl to UCI Medical Center in Orange. The driver of the car was not injured, Police Sgt. Ray Peterson said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1996 | NONA YATES
The plants and animals that live in the Earth's darkest environments are the focus of an exhibit at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History. "In the Dark" explores the worlds of a forest at night, a limestone cave, the ocean depths, life found beneath a typical backyard and how humans have adapted to the dark. There are interactive displays for kids--and adults--to tinker with, such as the computer game "Robomite" in which children help navigate a termite through the dark underground.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | K. C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
One of the most divisive questions in the affirmative action debate is whether the preferences hurt the very people they were intended to help. Some researchers have found that the stigma of being hired as part of an affirmative action effort erodes self-esteem and colors people "presumed incompetent" in the eyes of their colleagues. Others have found the opposite: that people benefiting from affirmative action feel welcomed, and appreciate the opportunity to display their abilities.
NEWS
October 13, 1999 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Caltech chemist Ahmed H. Zewail won the Nobel Prize for chemistry Tuesday for finding a way to freeze-frame the private matings of molecules using ultra-fast laser probes, a technique with the potential to revolutionize everything from dentistry to microelectronics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2013 | By Larry Gordon and Monte Morin
Thomas F. Rosenbaum, an expert in condensed matter physics and second in command at the University of Chicago, will become the new president of Caltech, officials announced Thursday. Rosenbaum, 58, currently is provost at the University of Chicago, where he also holds the position of John T. Wilson Distinguished Service Professor of Physics. On July 1, he will succeed Jean-Lou Chameau, who left Caltech earlier this year to head King Abdullah University of Science and Technology in Saudi Arabia.
SCIENCE
October 24, 2013 | By Larry Gordon and Monte Morin, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Thomas Rosenbaum, an expert in condensed matter physics, will become the new president of the California Institute of Technology, officials announced Thursday. Rosenbaum, 58, currently serves as provost at the University of Chicago, where he also holds the position of John T. Wilson Distinguished Service Professor of Physics. He succeeds Jean-Lou Chameau, who left Caltech earlier this year to head King Abdullah University of Science and Technology in Saudi Arabia.  Before becoming Chicago's provost in 2007, Rosenbaum studied the behavior of closely-packed atoms in solids and liquids at the university's Rosenbaum Lab . By experimenting on materials in extreme cold -- temperatures that approached absolute zero -- Rosenbaum and his colleagues were better able to examine the quantum behavior of substances.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|