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Jacqueline Bisset

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Jacqueline Bisset's interesting acceptance speech Sunday after winning the Golden Globe for supporting television actress was but one of the memorable moments that made the show "the beautiful mess" that hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler described at the end of the evening. The British actress was the second person of the evening, after Jennifer Lawrence, to receive an award. And Lawrence's speech was a bit of a mess too, especially the part where she profusely thanked "American Hustle" and "Silver Linings Playbook" writer-director David O. Russell for making her career what it is - without ever mentioning him by name.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Jacqueline Bisset's interesting acceptance speech Sunday after winning the Golden Globe for supporting television actress was but one of the memorable moments that made the show "the beautiful mess" that hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler described at the end of the evening. The British actress was the second person of the evening, after Jennifer Lawrence, to receive an award. And Lawrence's speech was a bit of a mess too, especially the part where she profusely thanked "American Hustle" and "Silver Linings Playbook" writer-director David O. Russell for making her career what it is - without ever mentioning him by name.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Susan King
Early in her career, Jacqueline Bisset discovered that she didn't need to be in every shot of a movie. Bisset came to that realization while making Jerry Paris' underrated 1970 drama "The Grasshopper," which cast her  as a wide-eyed teenager from British Columbia who winds up a prostitute in Las Vegas. It was the first time the British actress, who had become an international sensation in such films as the seminal 1968 thriller "Bullitt" and the 1970 granddaddy of disaster flicks, "Airport," carried a movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Susan King
Early in her career, Jacqueline Bisset discovered that she didn't need to be in every shot of a movie. Bisset came to that realization while making Jerry Paris' underrated 1970 drama "The Grasshopper," which cast her  as a wide-eyed teenager from British Columbia who winds up a prostitute in Las Vegas. It was the first time the British actress, who had become an international sensation in such films as the seminal 1968 thriller "Bullitt" and the 1970 granddaddy of disaster flicks, "Airport," carried a movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the period piece "End of Summer," Jacqueline Bisset is radiant as a rich, aristocratic turn-of-the-century spinster who unexpectedly has a second chance at love. The hourglass silhouette, the long skirts, the leg o' mutton sleeves of the gowns of the era are highly becoming on Bisset in this 1995 Showtime production now receiving theatrical release.
NEWS
April 14, 1985
I thoroughly enjoyed "Anna Karenina," thanks to the stunning performance of Jacqueline Bisset. She was terrific. Wendy Levin, Laguna Niguel
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1997 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jacqueline Bisset tries to be discerning when it comes to choosing film projects. "If you want a career that doesn't date badly, you have to find things that aren't too trendy," she says. "If you want to get hot, you do things that are trendy."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1987 | RODERICK MANN
"Ever since I got the role, I've been reading up on the subject," said Jacqueline Bisset. "And I have to tell you I can't find a single reference to Napoleon saying, 'Not tonight, Josephine.' " In two weeks British-born Bisset starts filming David Wolper's six-hour ABC-TV miniseries "Napoleon and Josephine" in France. The role of the empress Josephine is one for any actress to covet, and covet it Bisset does.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1985 | MORGAN GENDEL, Times Staff Writer
Jacqueline Bisset, actress, movie star and sometime film producer seemed annoyed at the notion that she was "doing TV." It's not the medium that irks her but the vocabulary. "I hate the word TV, Bisset said, lounging in her cozy Benedict Canyon home the other day. "It's 'television.' That's from my mother: Don't call it TV. Te-le-vi-sion." It's best to clear that up early, because some form of the word undoubtedly pops up in any interview with Bisset these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Towering above other films so far previewed for the Los Angeles Film Festival, which commences Friday at various venues, is Christopher Munch's "The Sleepy Time Gal." Munch first came to attention with "The Hours and Times," in which he sensitively imagined what might have occurred between John Lennon and Brian Epstein during a brief Barcelona interlude, and "Color of a Brisk and Leaping Day," a remarkably evocative account of the struggle to bring rail travel to Yosemite.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Towering above other films so far previewed for the Los Angeles Film Festival, which commences Friday at various venues, is Christopher Munch's "The Sleepy Time Gal." Munch first came to attention with "The Hours and Times," in which he sensitively imagined what might have occurred between John Lennon and Brian Epstein during a brief Barcelona interlude, and "Color of a Brisk and Leaping Day," a remarkably evocative account of the struggle to bring rail travel to Yosemite.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the period piece "End of Summer," Jacqueline Bisset is radiant as a rich, aristocratic turn-of-the-century spinster who unexpectedly has a second chance at love. The hourglass silhouette, the long skirts, the leg o' mutton sleeves of the gowns of the era are highly becoming on Bisset in this 1995 Showtime production now receiving theatrical release.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1997 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jacqueline Bisset tries to be discerning when it comes to choosing film projects. "If you want a career that doesn't date badly, you have to find things that aren't too trendy," she says. "If you want to get hot, you do things that are trendy."
NEWS
July 26, 1987
I found CBS' interpretation of "Anna Karenina" to be a real disappointment. Levin, the main character of the better half of the book, was not even shown once! Jacqueline Bisset was incapable of portraying Tolstoy's Anna; she looked more like a suffering TV starlet. The only actor who halfway saved the show was Christopher Reeve. I only wish he could have been in a better production. Lynn Stewart, Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1987 | RODERICK MANN
"Ever since I got the role, I've been reading up on the subject," said Jacqueline Bisset. "And I have to tell you I can't find a single reference to Napoleon saying, 'Not tonight, Josephine.' " In two weeks British-born Bisset starts filming David Wolper's six-hour ABC-TV miniseries "Napoleon and Josephine" in France. The role of the empress Josephine is one for any actress to covet, and covet it Bisset does.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1985 | MORGAN GENDEL, Times Staff Writer
Jacqueline Bisset, actress, movie star and sometime film producer seemed annoyed at the notion that she was "doing TV." It's not the medium that irks her but the vocabulary. "I hate the word TV, Bisset said, lounging in her cozy Benedict Canyon home the other day. "It's 'television.' That's from my mother: Don't call it TV. Te-le-vi-sion." It's best to clear that up early, because some form of the word undoubtedly pops up in any interview with Bisset these days.
REAL ESTATE
October 8, 1989 | RUTH RYON and Jack Smith, Times Staff Writer
His client was a movie director, realtor Jack Hupp said, and was adamant about living in Beverly Hills. The film maker had found a house he liked, Hupp said, but was so concerned that it have a Beverly Hills address that he made it a contingency in his offer. Hupp discovered to his alarm that the house was not within the city limits of Beverly Hills, but found with some quick checking that it was in the Beverly Hills Post Office area, which means that it has a Beverly Hills mailing address.
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