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Jacqueline Dreager

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1992 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Peterson rides the Metro Blue Line just about every day. Lately, the 68-year-old Long Beach resident has been wondering about "those things over there"--three unusual objects perched above the ice plant on the east bank of the Wardlow station. Were they some sort of newfangled technology to relay train signals? "They're sculpture," said Jon Moynes, project manager for the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission program conveniently dubbed Art for Rail Transit (A-R-T).
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1992 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Peterson rides the Metro Blue Line just about every day. Lately, the 68-year-old Long Beach resident has been wondering about "those things over there"--three unusual objects perched above the ice plant on the east bank of the Wardlow station. Were they some sort of newfangled technology to relay train signals? "They're sculpture," said Jon Moynes, project manager for the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission program conveniently dubbed Art for Rail Transit (A-R-T).
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1989 | Suvan Geer
The fiberglass-and-metal pods Jacqueline Dreager molds from abandoned Air Force radar covers are a curious balance of threat and amusement. It's hard not to enjoy the funky, let's-pretend artifice of the pill-shaped planets with Saturn-style wooden rings and time capsules of translucent plastic with uncertain contents. Like props from old science-fiction movies they are entertaining even if they do suggest the campy terror of "Invasion of the Body Snatchers."
NEWS
March 31, 1995 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly about art for The Times.
We can't get away from our childhoods. Sometimes this is a good thing. Los Angeles artist Jacqueline Dreager was born into a family of special-effects experts. Her father and two uncles worked for, among others, movie legend Cecil B. DeMille. "I grew up in my garage with my father, not with my mother at the sewing machine," Dreager said. "My uncle gave me tips on how to use fiberglass that you could never learn in school."
HOME & GARDEN
November 10, 2005
RE "Fall's Hush Breaks Over Venice" [Oct. 27]: Your article brought back a flood of nostalgia for my time in Venice. From my vivid memory, the quintessential changing of the seasons: the wind erosion fences. Nothing symbolizes the transformation from the season of tourist infestation to the subdued somber grayness that you are now entering than those fences. I had the privilege and the good fortune to live there from my late 20s to my late 30s. Thank you so much for the poignant reminder of my well-spent youth!
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1997 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As Earthly mortals, we can be as planet-centric or galaxy-centric as we wish, but there's no getting around space, that final frontier, that outer limit. Hale-Bopp recently brought that message home, reminder of both the mysterious grandeur of the cosmos and the bizarre and sometimes ineffable workings of human psychology. Images of the cosmos and otherworldly notions have been affected by media coverage of the Heaven's Gate mass suicide.
MAGAZINE
September 8, 1996 | Naomi Glauberman
Where do old power meters go to die? The Department of Water and Power's Recycling Center in the industrial north of the San Fernando Valley is the first stop. After that, some will be bought, cleaned, refurbished and shipped to the Philippines.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | SUSAN PATERNO
The Blue Line's Wardlow Road Metro station has a fiberglass, bronze, stainless steel and cement sculpture that "looks like the sky dropped a couple of giant pods in the parking lot," the artist said. "It's very spacey." Jacqueline Dreager's work, one of the first pieces of public art to land in L.A.'s Metro stations, combines modernism with history. Atop a pod-shaped table are a bronze globe made into a sundial, two bronze books and the Wallace Stevens poem "Planet on a Table."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1994 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Good intentions notwithstanding, we've gotten weary of art-as-lecture, art waggling its fault-finding finger and telling us how to behave. And yet there's no reason art shouldn't be poking its nose into socially relevant topics. It's all a matter of tone and style.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW
Visual art accounts for $332,750 (or 11.1%) of the $3 million in cultural grants announced Monday by the city's Cultural Affairs Department. L.A. Contemporary Exhibitions tops the list of 21 organization grantees, receiving $35,000. Other recipients include Self-Help Graphics ($15,000), UCLA's Wight Art Gallery ($12,500), the L.A. County Museum of Art ($10,000), Black Choreographers of California ($6,400), St. Elmo Village ($6,000), and the Southern California Women's Caucus for Art ($5,000).
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