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Jacqueline E Schafer

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BUSINESS
January 7, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jacqueline E. Schafer, the new chairwoman of the state Air Resources Board, said Thursday that she supports keeping California's electric car mandate. It was her first public comment on the issue. Her view runs counter to the hopes of big U.S. auto makers, who want to overturn an ARB rule requiring them to make available in California zero-emissions vehicles--almost certain to be electric cars--beginning in 1998.
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NEWS
November 23, 1994 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The chairwoman of the California Air Resources Board, denied confirmation by Democrats in the Senate, stepped down Tuesday but was appointed by Gov. Pete Wilson to a newly created post where she will retain considerable influence over state air pollution policy.
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BUSINESS
January 16, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's rule forcing production of the first modern, mass-market, zero-emission vehicles--most likely electric cars--has become increasingly controversial as the 1998 deadline approaches. The state's electric utilities, alternative-fuel vehicle and parts manufacturers and environmentalists--along with many political and business leaders--support the state mandate. But big U.S.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's rule forcing production of the first modern, mass-market, zero-emission vehicles--most likely electric cars--has become increasingly controversial as the 1998 deadline approaches. The state's electric utilities, alternative-fuel vehicle and parts manufacturers and environmentalists--along with many political and business leaders--support the state mandate. But big U.S.
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The chairwoman of the California Air Resources Board, denied confirmation by Democrats in the Senate, stepped down Tuesday but was appointed by Gov. Pete Wilson to a newly created post where she will retain considerable influence over state air pollution policy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1998 | DAVID REYES
Frank Robinson sat quietly with a smile on his face while elected officials took the podium Friday to launch a massive, $5.4-million dredging project in the upper back bay. Robinson, 78, is regarded as the granddaddy of the local environmental movement. With his wife, Frances, he has spent 34 years fighting to protect the upper bay from one development proposal after another. "This is great," Robinson said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1993
Last week, Southern California could give thanks for days on end of clear skies. On one morning, from atop Mt. Hollywood, a high point of Griffith Park, tiny Santa Barbara Island was visible to the naked eye, as were the high ridges of Santa Catalina. The clear desert sparkle was due in part to winter's favorable weather, in part to the light holiday traffic and in part to our own efforts. Californians, who understood the deadliness of smog, have been pioneers in air quality regulation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1990 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An agreement to undertake the estimated $29.5-million cleanup of hazardous waste at Camp Pendleton was signed Wednesday by federal, state and military officials. A joint effort will study the amount of environmental damage and remove contaminated material from the Marine Corps base, a major toxic site and the last large undeveloped coastal property in Southern California.
NEWS
November 20, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson on Friday appointed a former official in the Reagan and Bush administrations as chairwoman of the powerful California Air Resources Board, which is facing unprecedented pressure from industry to scale down its tough clean-air regulations. Jacqueline E. Schafer, who starts Monday, replaces Jananne Sharpless, who stepped down as ARB chairwoman Thursday when Wilson asked her to serve instead on the California Energy Commission, a less influential state board.
SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | PETE THOMAS
Running five to eight miles, kayaking for about an hour and riding mountain bikes 10 to 15 miles--that's a challenge. Doing it on a course that includes obstacles such as mud pits and 12-foot- barriers--that's an adventure. That's what the 300 competing teams will be up against in the Hi-Tec Adventure Racing Series national championships Saturday at 4:30 p.m. at Castaic Lake Recreation Area. The actual course isn't divulged until the day of the race.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jacqueline E. Schafer, the new chairwoman of the state Air Resources Board, said Thursday that she supports keeping California's electric car mandate. It was her first public comment on the issue. Her view runs counter to the hopes of big U.S. auto makers, who want to overturn an ARB rule requiring them to make available in California zero-emissions vehicles--almost certain to be electric cars--beginning in 1998.
SPORTS
February 7, 1996 | PETE THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Borge Ousland was not out of his mind when he set out recently to try to pull a sled for 100 days, 1,675 miles across the continent of Antarctica, though some might argue that point with the 33-year-old Norwegian. After all, who in their right mind would journey into the coldest and most inhospitable region on earth merely for the sake of trying to become the first to get from one side to the other--alone and without mechanized equipment, animals or air drops?
NEWS
April 28, 1997 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When U.S. Secretary of Interior Bruce Babbitt flew in to launch the state's first "conservation bank"--a 180-acre nature preserve amid advancing subdivisions--he called it "a vision of the next century." Two years later, that vision of a pristine sanctuary for native plants and animals is still unrealized on this mesa with an ocean view. Neighbors complain that Carlsbad Highlands has become a playground for motorcycles and off-road vehicles and a shooting range for hunters.
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